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9 hours ago

Lost Ottawa

View of Ottawa from the top of the toboggan slide at Rideau Hall in 1878. You can just see Parliament Hill way off in the distance.

The toboggan slide appeared in our 8 am post, and this might give you an idea of how high it was.

This picture was taken in summer, but I think that is the curling shed down below.

(LAC PA-013149)
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View of Ottawa from the top of the toboggan slide at Rideau Hall in 1878. You can just see Parliament Hill way off in the distance.

The toboggan slide appeared in our 8 am post, and this might give you an idea of how high it was.

This picture was taken in summer, but I think that is the curling shed down below.

(LAC PA-013149)

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nothing beats this hill, then, or even now...Lowertown east...

There was also a big slide in Old Ottawa South - a hill that’s since been removed (but there’s vestige bumps), between the houses and Today’s colonel By drive

Do people toboggan are the experimental farm still?!

Would the long building at the bottom be the livery stables? If so, my great grandfather who immigrated in 1881 from Birmingham, was a livery man for Princess Louise & The Marquess of Lorne until my grandfather died in 1898

There was a huge slide around the end of Parkdale that shot clean out onto the Ottawa River.

Dang that must be one heck of a toboggan Hill.

Angel's Square as Brian Doyle would say?

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10 hours ago

Lost Ottawa

Toboggan party at Rideau Hall, ca 1880, hosted by Princess Louise, the fourth daughter of Queen Victoria and wife of Governor General John Campbell, the Marquess of Lorne.

You would have been totally thrilled to meet a member of the Royal Family in those days.

Behind them is the toboggan run that was a feature of Rideau Hall for years.

(LAC PA-127314)
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Toboggan party at Rideau Hall, ca 1880, hosted by Princess Louise, the fourth daughter of Queen Victoria and wife of Governor General John Campbell, the Marquess of Lorne.

You would have been totally thrilled to meet a member of the Royal Family in those days.

Behind them is the toboggan run that was a feature of Rideau Hall for years.  

(LAC PA-127314)

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This would have been great to be at. Ya gotta love the "bonhomme" type parkas on those in the front row. 🙂

I wonder if any of the women in this picture even gave a fleeting thought to borrow a pair of men's long pants to wear when sledding. I can't believe I would not have thought of it. lol

My grandmother used to talk about these parties....."so much fun" said she....

I used to got to the skating parties at the GGs back in the 80s...so much fun... then hypersecurity took over the world...

Joji Furukawa check out the capotes.

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22 hours ago

Lost Ottawa

For those of you who have enjoyed a brew at Darcy McGee's on the southwest corner of Elgin and Spark Streets, here is the scene in 1875 when the corner was occupied by Scott's Confectionary.

Once you have taken your refreshment, you can go next door to buy everything you need to run your mill, including saws, belting, files, axes, steam engines and more!

With the wooden sidewalks, and the gents hanging about, it kind of looks like a scene from the Old West ... minus the six shooters.

(LAC C002233)
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For those of you who have enjoyed a brew at Darcy McGees on the southwest corner of Elgin and Spark Streets, here is the scene in 1875 when the corner was occupied by Scotts Confectionary.

Once you have taken your refreshment, you can go next door to buy everything you need to run your mill, including saws, belting, files, axes, steam engines and more!

With the wooden sidewalks, and the gents hanging about, it kind of looks like a scene from the Old West ... minus the six shooters.

(LAC C002233)

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Here's an 1865 photo showing Scott's Confectionary, across Elgin Street from the Russell House (LAC MIKAN 3326032)

No. 17 would not be next to where Darcy McGees is now - that side of the street are even numbered addresses

"A Lockwood" was Alvira Lockwood (1843-1925), Ottawa's first female professional photographer. She had a studio above Scott's Confectionery.

Yup...I've had a pint or two at Darcy's. Great ambiance. Thanks for the additional history!

Looking at the add I realize I never considered how many varieties and different uses for coal. I remember going to the coal bin for a bucket but never knew/asked about the type. Grate coal I would expect. Thanks for posting.

Is there a connection with Scott’s Chicken Villa KFC?

Even back then it was a busy corner!

Are those piles of horse manure in front of the sidewalk?

Jeff O'Reilly

Gail Reid

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1 day ago

Lost Ottawa

Your Morning Commute, featuring the Union Suspension Bridge that carried traffic from Ottawa to Hull from 1843 to 1889.

Hard to tell exactly, but I believe this is the view from Chaudiere Island on the Ontario side.

It was a good looking bridge. However, you can see why it eventually had to be replaced. It was too narrow for increasing traffic and streetcars.

(From Ottawa Illustrated which must date to the 1890s, since it does show streetcars in other photos)
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Your Morning Commute, featuring the Union Suspension Bridge that carried traffic from Ottawa to Hull from 1843 to 1889.

Hard to tell exactly, but I believe this is the view from Chaudiere Island on the Ontario side.

It was a good looking bridge. However, you can see why it eventually had to be replaced. It was too narrow for increasing traffic and streetcars.

(From Ottawa Illustrated which must date to the 1890s, since it does show streetcars in other photos)

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You members blow my mind ..with your knowledge, sharings, participation, respect for each other..it is what makes this group exceptional! ..merci!!💗..moi

A memento from 16 Nov 1895.

The openness of the approach to the bridge definitely identifies this as the Chaudiere Island side. The other end of the suspension bridge connected directly to a narrow stone arch bridge, as shown in this photo (LAC MIKAN 3372211)

Too bad it wasn't left in place; think how lovely it would be today for pedestrians and cyclists!

An article in 1896 about Ottawa in 1846.

Yes, the view is from Chaudière Island and from before 1882. In the distance you can see the Italianate tower of EB Eddy's home and the cupola that graced what was once Wright's Tavern/store.

It is looking East.... to Hull. Check the shadows of the stay cables... To my thinking... the sun is high in the summer sky (say 1 pm).. but in Ottawa the sun never casts shadows to the South.

A side view from 1870.

24 April 1889

Wow such beautiful architecture.

Wonder if they ever kept the plaque ?

Geoff Wyght’s clipping post shows that this picture is from 1844.

Everyone dressed so much better back then.

Olivier Charbonneau

Such a nice looking bridge

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2 days ago

Lost Ottawa

A chap comes off what is described as "the slide" in Ottawa in 1914, which I believe is the Rockliffe ski jump (rather than the toboggan slide on the Governor General's grounds), built by local resident Sigurd Lockerberg and know as "Suicide Hill"

Apparently the record distance from this jump was 28.7 meters, made by Lockerberg himself, but the jump was rebuilt 1915 and the record extended to 44.2 meters by Ragnar Omtvedt.

But forget the record! Check out the natty attire, complete with tie!

(LAC PA-060968)
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A chap comes off what is described as the slide in Ottawa in 1914, which I believe is the Rockliffe ski jump (rather than the toboggan slide on the Governor Generals grounds), built by local resident Sigurd Lockerberg and know as Suicide Hill

Apparently the record distance from this jump was 28.7 meters, made by Lockerberg himself, but the jump was rebuilt 1915 and the record extended to 44.2 meters by Ragnar Omtvedt.

But forget the record! Check out the natty attire, complete with tie!

(LAC PA-060968)

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This is an article from the "Coronation Edition" of the Journal on 1 June 1953, talking about 1910.

The Ottawa Electric Streetcars going to the Rockcliffe Park Circle had racks on the side to accommodate everyone's skis.

One of the lodges at Camp Fortune was called the Lockerberg Lodge named after that gentleman.

My father Edward Mann used to tell us about going off that jump as a young man. He also used to talk about taking the train up to Chelsea and ski back to Ottawa.

This is an article from 1935 about the 1890s.

That must have been one heck of a rebuild in 1915.

Just think they had to walk back up that hill no lifts in those days😒

Hi, I am new to Ottawa, so forgive my maybe dumb question, but would « Rockcliffe Jump » have been in actual Rockcliffe Park?

When the base was operating there was a tow rope there I believe.

No need for extreme sports there. Just having fun. It's a great photo

My Dad Bert Morrissette won the jumping contest in 1930 ...if you go on thr Parkway in summer you can see the base on the hill...my Dad indicated them to me

So cool

Is that Paul Couvrette

Nice of the people at the bottom to stand around on the bottom of the hill. Better targets that way.

Oh god Debbie Crowder remember that tow rope!!!!

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2 days ago

Lost Ottawa

Classic Ottawa view from Parliament Hill, at least until 1971. Yes, the E.B. Eddy Lower Mill with log pile, proudly watched over by the spire of Notre-Dame-de-Grâce.

The church would burn down that year, and the Eddy Plant disappeared the following year to make way for what is now the Museum of History.
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Classic Ottawa view from Parliament Hill, at least until 1971. Yes, the E.B. Eddy Lower Mill with log pile, proudly watched over by the spire of Notre-Dame-de-Grâce.

The church would burn down that year, and the Eddy Plant disappeared the following year to make way for what is now the Museum of History.

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While pulp and paper may be the foundation of these twin cities, it’s much prettier now, with these plants gone.

When I was a child growing up in Alta Vista on the Ottawa side, one could smell the E. B. Eddy plant if the wind was in the right direction on a cold day in the winter. I also remember the large log booms traveling down the Ottawa River, and that doesn't seem so long ago.

Growing up on the quebec side that pile is memorable.

Here is a pic of the same area taken last summer.

The plant at Thurso is gone too. It was replaced by a pot greenhouse that turns the sky pink at night. We would call that visual pollution, and they are not making money yet, based on the stock markets.

Loved that view from my grandmother's balcony,

The Digester Tower is still on the site as a remnant of pulp and paper making

Remember all this we'll!!! Was there worked there for 38years with all my brother paper mackers

I still remember the burning wood smell.

I was working the night shift and watched it burn.

I like this one. It’s cool when you can put yourself in the same vantage point

Que de bons souvenirs...

I remember the smell.

Oh god yes remember when Maurice Villeneuve

Gab

I remember the smell and the logs also

Yes I remember the logs in the river and the sulfur smell from the plant when the wind blew the wrong way.

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2 days ago

Lost Ottawa

The makers of tourist brochures loved composite pictures of prominent Ottawa buildings. Here's an example from 1900.

You have City Hall on the left, at Elgin and Queen.

Top right is the "Collegiate, meaning Lisgar Collegiate, on Lisgar (where else?).

Bottom right is the Protestant Orphan home, on the west side of Elgin between Lisgar and Cooper, where the old Elgin Theatre used to be.

(Ottawa Illustrated, dated to 1900)
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The makers of tourist brochures loved composite pictures of prominent Ottawa buildings. Heres an example from 1900.

You have City Hall on the left, at Elgin and Queen. 

Top right is the Collegiate, meaning Lisgar Collegiate, on Lisgar (where else?). 

Bottom right is the Protestant Orphan home, on the west side of Elgin between Lisgar and Cooper, where the old Elgin Theatre used to be. 

(Ottawa Illustrated, dated to 1900)

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Interesting that a high school and orphan’s home were tourist sites. Pretty buildings, but no Parliament, or other options. PS not all of the schools are on the streets that bear their names. Nepean is in the former Nepean Township, but far from the street of that name, for example.

Lisgar was Doris’ High School. But No! She was not there when the picture was taken!But possibly her Father.

Lisgar. My Alma mater from '60 to '65. Was actually head cheerleader! Went to the fabulous 175th reunion in 2018. Terrific event!

Love these buildings. Boy, they sure don't make 'em like they used to.

That always mystifies me there are many more examples of that over much of Ottawa

There was no need to differentiate; The Collegiate Institute only had one campus.

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3 days ago

Lost Ottawa

Ottawa From (slightly in) the Air, featuring a look up Elgin from Old City Hall circa 1900.

Thats the Grand Union Hotel on the far left and the Russell House hotel complex on the right.

Check out the Elgin streetcar there at Sparks Street. You wonder how it made its way through the mud!

(From Ottawa Illustrated, published by Chas. Thurburn, 80 Sparks Street)
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Ottawa From (slightly in) the Air, featuring a look up Elgin from Old City Hall circa 1900.

Thats the Grand Union Hotel on the far left and the Russell House hotel complex on the right.

Check out the Elgin streetcar there at Sparks Street. You wonder how it made its way through the mud!

(From Ottawa Illustrated, published by Chas. Thurburn, 80 Sparks Street)

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While this was in the book Thorburn published in 1900, the photo may be years earlier - perhaps late 1893 when Thorburn produced an earlier collection. Here's another page from the same book, and this view of Sparks Street can be dated to late 1893 by the business names. Businesses on the right (south) side are: 90 Abbott & Wooton Drugs; 88 Felix Latour Barber; 86 R. Uglow Real Estate, Butterworth Coal, 84 Kenny Bros. Tailors. (Thorburn's own shop at #80 would be under one the awnings.)

Here is the 1901 fire insurance map for that stretch of Elgin.

That should be Thorburn, not "Thurburn." Sparks Street bookseller Chas. H. Thorburn advertised "views of Ottawa" for sale in 1893, and "new views of Ottawa" in 1900; Queens University dates this book 1900. It's available at Internet Archive archive.org/details/ottawaillustrate00thor/page/n1

Great angle! And, ya, you can hardly see the streetcar tracks.

THANKS That was the year my grandmother went to Normal School here in Ottawa.

Great photo!!!

The country started going downhill when they eliminated Normal Schools.

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4 days ago

Lost Ottawa

Denise Trottier shares a classic Ottawa street-scene created by her father, Canadian artist Gerald Trottier.

Denise notes that this is one of Trottier's earlier works and features a cold winter's day on Newton Avenue in the Glebe circa 1945, when the artist lived there.

(Image courtesy of Shoebox Studios)
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Denise Trottier shares a classic Ottawa street-scene created by her father, Canadian artist Gerald Trottier.  

Denise notes that this is one of Trottiers earlier works and features a cold winters day on Newton Avenue in the Glebe circa 1945, when the artist lived there.

(Image courtesy of Shoebox Studios)

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You can see more Gerald Trottier work on Facebook, Instagram and www.geraldtrottier.ca

The mosaic around “The Egg” lecture theatre, Tory Science Building, Carleton University. . .

It looks like the house I grew up in on Willard St. ❤️

It's Newton Street in the Glebe

Beautiful - really captures the Glebe - my favourite part of Ottawa❣️

Love this .. added bonus is a painting by your father.. what a beautiful gift

I lived on Craig St. In the 60’s and knew this area well

Great painting. It really captures the Ottawa winter so well.

Hey lived on the street growing up.

This reminds me of Armstrong Street, in Hintonburg (near Bayview). I lived in this neighbourhood (1986-1990).

Beautiful.. it really captures the feel of this street in winter

What a lovely piece of art!

I have a painting from his "boxers" series. I know him for his liturgical work and his work on a couple of Canadian stamps. Thanks for sharing!

BeautifulI love it - captures Ottawa in the winter

Love this picture!

I love that painting.

I expect kids to start a snowball fight.

Great work.

I love it !!!

I remember Newton. A long time ago but I remember.

Beautiful!

Love this!

Just wonderful!

Love this

I really like it.

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