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16 hours ago

Lost Ottawa

Here's a solemn occasion that took place in February of 1919. It's the funeral cortège for Prime Minister Wilfrid Laurier, about to turn onto Rideau Street from Mackenzie and as it made its way to the Victoria Museum, where Laurier would lie in state.

The picture is extra interesting for two reason. One is that it shows how open the street was before the Chateau Laurier got its new wing (a decade later).

Second, there are two overhangs to the entrance of the Daly Building on the right (where some of the people are standing). I don't think I ever noticed those before ...

(Bytown Museum P1835)
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Heres a solemn occasion that took place in February of 1919. Its the funeral cortège for Prime Minister Wilfrid Laurier, about to turn onto Rideau Street from Mackenzie and as it made its way to the Victoria Museum, where Laurier would lie in state.

The picture is extra interesting for two reason. One is that it shows how open the street was before the Chateau Laurier got its new wing (a decade later).

Second, there are two overhangs to the entrance of the Daly Building on the right (where some of the people are standing). I dont think I ever noticed those before ...

(Bytown Museum P1835)

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That looks very much like MacKenzie Street corner of Rideau./Wellington and the Revenue Canada building next beyond the Daly building.

Looks like you corrected the earlier mistake but they are turning onto Mackenzie from Rideau, heading for the Basilica

The direction they are walking, shows they are turning left onto MacKenzie Street and heading heading north passing the Connaught Bldg on the right.

Which way is the photo facing? Wouldn't you be heading in a straight line from Rideau to Sussex. Looks here like the cottage is turning left. But Colonel By Drive wasn't there at the time...

It looks more as if that is the Daly Building with the Connaught Building in the foggy background. If so, the cortege is turning onto or from Mackenzie Avenue.

Here is map of the downtown area from 1918 to help visualize the various intersections being discussed.

I would say they are turning onto "little" Sussex and going to the side/east entrance of the train station, from which he headed to Montreal.

it looks as if they're on the way to the Basilica for the funeral. He was buried in Ottawa at Notre Dame Cemetery.

Maybe the overhangs fell off that day because people were sitting on them.

Rideau st and Wellington run into each other mso either its Mackenzie ave or Sussex dr?

Is it not, 'about to turn onto Rideau Street from Mackenzie Street' ?

I love our history! A country so rich with all of it’s hardships

When our Canada was thankful for these men who help us get all these great things.....pensions, healthcare, etc.

That is Mackenzie Ave. looking north.

Very sad day. My grandparents so loved Wilfred Laurier.

The death of Sir Wilfred Laurier had a significant affect on the life and career of my grandfather, J Alexandre Castonguay. My grandfather was a portrait photographer in Ottawa and only one month before Laurier died, he asked my grandfather to do a sitting. The request was so significant to J Alexandre that it caused him to have a nervous breakdown. He took a month to recover and prepare for the request. My grandfather was about to give a toast to Canada in the New York Photographer’s society annual banquet when he received word of the death of Laurier. He was overcome with emotion and could not finish the toast, so his mentor world famous photographer Pirie MacDonald finished it for him. J Alexander was preparing to return to Ottawa to complete the sitting request, but he was too late. Pirie MacDonald told him that the more famous the man, the easier the sitting. They are used to being posed by photographers. When J Alexandre Castonguay returned to Ottawa, he mentored many fellow photographers and about a decade later was one of the closest friends of Yousuf Karsh. The death of Laurier was a catalyst to a great career in photography for J Alexandre.

This National Archives of Canada film of the cortège may help: www.youtube.com/watch?v=E8hS_IrQVl4

Former PM Diefenbaker (born 1895) often used to tell a story of meeting PM Laurier during a campaign stop in 1910. The story has been called "false history" but nevertheless it was a good one. thestarphoenix.com/news/local-news/meeting-between-diefenbaker-and-laurier-never-happened-author-...

I’ll bet if Truedope died tomorrow people would definitely not line the streets.

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1 day ago

Lost Ottawa

Your Evening Commute, looking west from the corner of Bank and Wellington in the downtown Ottawa of 1901.

At the time, Wellington west of Bank was a thriving community with all sorts of businesses on both sides of the street.

You can see the spire of St. Andrew's in the distance. The streetcars were on their way to and from Chaudiere Falls and Hull.

(Bytown Museum P615)
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Your Evening Commute, looking west from the corner of Bank and Wellington in the downtown Ottawa of 1901.

At the time, Wellington west of Bank was a thriving community with all sorts of businesses on both sides of the street.

You can see the spire of St. Andrews in the distance. The streetcars were on their way to and from Chaudiere Falls and Hull.

(Bytown Museum P615)

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This photo may be from a little earlier than 1901. The building on the corner of Bank bears the sign for the Canadian College of Music, which moved from that location (44 Bank) to 150 Cooper Street in May of 1898. The rooftop sign in the centre of the photo says "Cecil"; the old Royal Exchange Hotel at that location was remodelled and opened a the Hotel Cecil in January of 1898.

19th and early 20th c photography had to contend with the technological limitations of the time. Full light photographs often resulted in overexposure and a loss of detail. The solution was to draw the missing details onto either the negative or the print itself. The spire of St Andrews, along with the carving on the cornice of the building on this side of St. Andrews, seem to have been added after the picture was taken. Same is likely true of the roof of the Russell House Hotel, in your Feb 10 post.

Such a fascinating mix of architectural styles.

Lrt humming along in the snow. Wonder how they made sure those switches didn't stall 120 years ago

yeah, thing sure did change after the Eddy Match fire

WoW!

Catherine Claros Harrison

Carol Julia

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2 days ago

Lost Ottawa

Partially frozen Rideau Falls, with the old Ottawa City Hall in the background, in 1971.

Great shot not only show part of the falls apparently frozen, but also the huge ice-cliff that sometimes builds up a few metres away from the falls themselves.

(Part of LAC Mikan 3346734)
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Partially frozen Rideau Falls, with the old Ottawa City Hall in the background, in 1971.

Great shot not only show part of the falls apparently frozen, but also the huge ice-cliff that sometimes builds up a few metres away from the falls themselves.

(Part of LAC Mikan 3346734)

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Also National Research Council building where I worked, early 1960s.

You can see the Lester B. Pearson Building under construction in the background. Oddly enough, a crane is back today for the building's mid-life makeover.

Rideau Falls, winter 2011

Sure sign of spring when they cut the keys in the Rideau River, and you could watch them go over the falls from this vantage point ! 😉

1971 reminds me of the record snow that year when I graduated from Carleton.

Tavern on the Falls now occupies this spot

My dad, Colin LaSalle worked at NRC also.

Across the way, on the west side of the falls, is where the old paper mill which used to house the National Film Board before it moved to Montreal.

City Hall before the Safdie scaffolding.

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3 days ago

Lost Ottawa

In our earlier post this morning, we mentioned that Cartier Square at the corner of Elgin and Laurier was often used for events during Ottawa's winter carnival.

Here's the ice castle in the square, possibly as late as 1922, with the Normal School (now part of City Hall) in the background).

This is spot is now occupied by the Ottawa Courthouse. When you get a frosty reception from one of the judges there, now you know why!

(Bytown Museum P2025)
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In our earlier post this morning, we mentioned that Cartier Square at the corner of Elgin and Laurier was often used for events during Ottawas winter carnival.

Heres the ice castle in the square, possibly as late as 1922, with the Normal School (now part of City Hall) in the background). 

This is spot is now occupied by the Ottawa Courthouse. When you get a frosty reception from one of the judges there, now you know why! 

(Bytown Museum P2025)

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The Ice Palace photo shows the end of a low building with a cylindrical roof. That building does not appear in many photos, but it can be seen in this view of Cartier Square, from CNR's set of 1922 Winter Carnival photos at LAC (with the Ice Palace just out of view at right.) Gone by 1928, it appears to have been a holdover from WWI. From the CNR photo set at LAC, MIKAN 3517932 to 3517941, this is 3517941:

There is no doubt this was the Ice Palace built in Cartier Square for the big Winter Carnival of 1922. This was not a regularly recurring or frequent event; the Winter Carnival of 1922 was the first big one since 1895. From the Journal, Jan 31, 1922:

Here's another photo showing the location of the Ice Palace (LAC MIKAN 3517932)

My mom and her siblings wold have been there for sure as they lived downtown after my Grandfather was killed by a tree coming down the track when it wasn't suppose to in Espanola where he worked and was killed around 1915. My Grandmother ran a boarding house on O'Connor St for over 50 years. On nice man Mr Doud lived there for close to 40 years and passed away in her room there. Very sad.

That ice castle is beautiful! Together with the snow bear, and it’s obvious that we don’t have as much fun building things outside like this as they used to!

They should build this ice castle again

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3 days ago

Lost Ottawa

It's small, but it's still Ottawa kids (and maybe some adults, back there?) working on a snow sculpture in Cartier Square at the corner of Elgin and Laurier. You can see the Drill Hall in the background.

This is where the court house would be now, with city hall behind it. Back then it was a huge empty field, but used quite a lot during the winter carnival.

I'd say those kids are making the head of a pig, but then my shrink would have questions ...

(Bytown Museum P3018)
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Its small, but its still Ottawa kids (and maybe some adults, back there?) working on a snow sculpture in Cartier Square at the corner of Elgin and Laurier. You can see the Drill Hall in the background.

This is where the court house would be now, with city hall behind it. Back then it was a huge empty field, but used quite a lot during the winter carnival.

Id say those kids are making the head of a pig, but then my shrink would have questions ... 

(Bytown Museum P3018)

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We used to make snow sculptures all the time when I was a kid... although we called them snowmen. 🙂

4 days ago

Lost Ottawa

Apparently the Ottawa Citizen not only made kids deliver those heavy newspapers in the winter ... but in their summer clothes!

Just kidding, but you do have to wonder what the photographer for Newton's was thinking. On the other hand, he did get the shot.

The shot in question was just another city snow picture in December of 1954, showing the snow-sculpture created by Fred Larson (spelled Laursen in the paper) of 71 MacCLaren Street. That's ten year-old Brigit and 13 year-old Jen admiring dad's work.

(City of Ottawa ArchiveCA031150)
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Apparently the Ottawa Citizen not only made kids deliver those heavy newspapers in the winter ... but in their summer clothes!

Just kidding, but you do have to wonder what the photographer for Newtons was thinking. On the other hand, he did get the shot.

The shot in question was just another city snow picture in December of 1954, showing the snow-sculpture created by Fred Larson (spelled Laursen in the paper) of 71 MacCLaren Street. Thats ten year-old Brigit and 13 year-old Jen admiring dads work.

(City of Ottawa ArchiveCA031150)

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Today again. Must have been a well-off family with this house.

In the mid 1960s, a resident on Cavendish Road in Alta Vista created a quite-large snow sculpture of a scantily dressed woman. Some neighbours were outraged, and the picture of the sculpture appeared in the Globe and Mail newspaper. Art is in the eye of the beholder. 🙂

My sisters delivered the pennysaver. We would sit in the living room and put them together every week. Delivering the citizen would’ve been too much with school and such, for us.

I remember helping a friend deliver the Citizen in the mid 80s. Wasn’t too hard, and was a good job for kids.

I lived a few blocks away on Florence st., helped my friend deliver the Citizen, he said the hardest part was getting people to pay.

The father is long gone although the kids are in their mid to late 70’s. Tempus fugit. Any idea out there if they are alive and well here in Ottawa?

I actually did deliver the newspaper in the coldest of Ottawa's winter....not fun and not many tips coming from neighbors who were cost in their heated homes!

I used to deliver the ottawa citizen in the late 80s as a teenager...today it wouldnt make sense...

You couldn't give away those houses 40 years ago.

I woke up at 4 am by accident in time for the paper to be delivered. Guess what? It's not a kid on a bike. It's a man in a car.

I’ve never seen a snowman ⛄️ like that!!

Today

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4 days ago

Lost Ottawa

Alexandre Bellerive shares a little "Lost Hull," featuring this building on the other side of the Ottawa River.

Writes Alexandre:

"This is he presbytery of the Notre-Dame-de-Grâce church in Hull. Built in 1889. The church and its presbytery survived the 1900 Hull-Ottawa fire, but the church burnt down in another fire 70 years later. The presbytery is now part of the Four Points hotel on Laurier Street and is mainly used for conferences.
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Alexandre Bellerive shares a little Lost Hull, featuring this building on the other side of the Ottawa River.

Writes Alexandre:

This is he presbytery of the Notre-Dame-de-Grâce church in Hull. Built in 1889. The church and its presbytery survived the 1900 Hull-Ottawa fire, but the church burnt down in another fire 70 years later. The presbytery is now part of the Four Points hotel on Laurier Street and is mainly used for conferences.

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the tree is a big bigger these days

My parents were married in that church in 1941. When it was demolished in 1972, my dad giggled when he asked my mom if they would still be married. She didn't think that was funny.😡

I had wondered what that building was - having attended workshops there.

I used to ride my bicycle in that parking lot.

Why did they need such a big place? Was it a seminary or something?

1952

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5 days ago

Lost Ottawa

Sunday Drive ... along Preston Street in your Ford Model T snow truck, circa 1925. And while you are at it, you might as well pick up some snow for the Ottawa Electric Railway.

The picture shows the adaptability of the Model T. You could stick practically anything on the back!

As for Preston Street, my thought is that you are looking north from somewhere Somerset towards Wellington where a huge building sat at the end of the T-Junction. You can see it in the distance.

At the time, the building was used for "government stores." Previously it had been shops for Carbide Willson's International Marine Signal Company. Later it was the O'Keefe beer warehouse.

(City of Ottawa Archives CA015068)
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Sunday Drive ... along Preston Street in your Ford Model T snow truck, circa 1925. And while you are at it, you might as well pick up some snow for the Ottawa Electric Railway.

The picture shows the adaptability of the Model T. You could stick practically anything on the back!

As for Preston Street, my thought is that you are looking north from somewhere Somerset towards Wellington where a huge building sat at the end of the T-Junction. You can see it in the distance.

At the time, the building was used for government stores. Previously it had been shops for Carbide Willsons International Marine Signal Company. Later it was the OKeefe beer warehouse.

(City of Ottawa Archives CA015068)

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Great picture of days gone by. When I got my first car (1967), we had to drive over the railway tracks even though the railway cars had been removed for years. It was difficult to drive onto these tracks, you had to drive in between them... kept thinking my car would suffer because they would jerk the front wheels. It was harder when there were two sets of tracks and you had to turn left through four sets. Very happy to finally see them go.

My Grandfather delivered beer for O'keefe. I have a company patch of his in my basement. They lived at 36 Preston til I was 5 (which was 50 years ago) and I believe the house was rented to him because he was an Okeefe employee.

During those years, Al Capon's grandparents lived on this street at the south-east corner of Preston/Gladstone. When the heat was on, he would come up and stay with them until things cooled down.

The building is still there at Preston at Spruce...

Not much has changed in 95 years

It would be nice to see my house I grew up about a couple blocks...eccles st

This picture is a amazing look into Ottawa history. The house I lived in 30 years ago is the first house after the building on the left hand side.

These photos are precious...so glad we have them and so glad they are being posted for everyone to see...👍

My family lived at 192 Preston and in the area for over 100 years

Wonderful bit of automobilia.

I love your pictures of Ottawa lost.

Looks like they are all driving south toward Dow's Lake to dump the snow.

Street cars that actually run in winter....what a novel idea!

What a terrific photo!!

My uncle worked for O’Keefe breweries back in the 50’s. That warehouse was also used by E.B. Eddy.

I am pretty sure the trucks were loaded by hand too.

I was writing about when I lived on Preston St., and my story disappeared. Oh well, I lose a lot these days, lol.

Wasn't the large building eventually a brewery? 🤨

We should have never got rid of the street cars 😞

Great photo!

i wonder how those rail cars performed

Snow removal day

See. People used to buy snow!!

Bring back the trams

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