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13 hours ago

Lost Ottawa

Someplace we haven't had a picture of for a while --- Ottawa's Capitol Theatre, once located at Queen and Bank.

Someplace you might have found your self on a Friday night for a movie or a concert, or just to spend some time in an old school palace.

(City of Ottawa Archives CA022546)
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Someplace we havent had a picture of for a while --- Ottawas Capitol Theatre, once located at Queen and Bank.

Someplace you might have found your self on a Friday night for a movie or a concert, or just to spend some time in an old school palace.

(City of Ottawa Archives CA022546)

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My great grandfather, Frank Hunt, was the craftsman who created the paperwork in this theatre.

The Capital Theater was like a palace. The architectural features show up in this great photo with the huge marble staircase and the brass railings that greeted you as you entered this theater. The huge crystal chandelier hanging in the foyer added to the architectural beauty. Too bad it's all gone, but the memories will linger with the patrons of the many movies, and the many live performances shared there forever !๐Ÿ‘

Where we went for free movies as school patrols

Saw the ten Commandments there and Sound of Music. But I also remember it for the School patrol celebrations. Once a year, all the school patrols would get treated to a movie and popcorn and drink at the Capital...got the day off school in recognition of being a patrol...it was amazing with 100s of kids. The Capitol should never have been taken down.

When I was a little girl I felt I was in a beautiful castle entering a magical world of make believe sorry in a way that has ended.

Saw Gordie Lightfoot there mid sixties what a great concert

As teenagers we watched so many movies there. Probably didn't appreciate the beauty. What a shame it couldn't have been preserved.

The ladies washrooms were beautiful with ornate mirrors and velvet benches for us to sit to freshen up our hair. I felt like royalty walking into that building. STILL wonder where all the beautiful things went

Saw Jimmy Hendrix for 25 cents at his rehearsal in the afternoon. Awesome time.

Such a beautiful building i worked there as an usher when they had concert. Just great memories ๐Ÿฅฐ

Just earlier tonight my grandfather in law was telling us how he ushered at the Capitol one summer in the late ‘50s. The Ten Commandments was such a big hit and played for so long that it was the only film his whole stint there.

Gorgeous place. I saw Wilson Pickett and the Hollies on stage there in the 60’s. I went with a friend to see the debut of a Hard Days Night movie there it was so exciting seeing the Beatles movie 50cents got us in and we stayed there and watched it over and over for hours๐Ÿคฆ‍โ™€๏ธ My Grandmother worked there so long ago when the Ballets were on. I still talk about this grand place wouldn’t it be a wonderful treasure to have now?

Rehearsed for Anne of Green Gables on those stairs, felt so special even at 9 years of age.

I was always in awe walking up those stairs to take a seat in the balcony area with my Mom. What a glorious building.

Went there many times in the 50s and 60s.. I also had my ballet recital there when I was 7 years old. What a venue it would have been for broadway plays today. So sad that men without vision tore it down. How could they not protect it as heritage, same with Rideau Street Convent and many other beautiful houses and structures in Ottawa. It seems we don`t put enough importance on heritage and soon all we will be left with will be square boxes with no soul or imagination.

It was a beautiful theatre! So sad it’s no longer there! I saw Gone With the Wind there and many other movies.

I worked there as an usher in my teens and was privy to many great performances. Why did they have to destroy this beautiful building? We just can't leave things alone.

It was a beautiful theatre. Went there to watch movies many times as a kid. I really loved that staircase. Such a pity it’s gone.

When I was a little girl (late 1950s), my grandma would take me to "The Capitol". It was a very special treat ...

Always loved that theatre. So many memories

I saw Jimi Hendrix there!

So beautiful. Such a shame that no one realized this beauty should be cherished and kept for future generations to enjoy.

I was literally just getting takeout at Capitol Burgers at Queen Street Fare and going to come home and look up the theatre when I got home and just saw this. What a shame. ๐Ÿ˜ข

I was there so many times! Watched all my musicals there! I wish they wouldn’t have demolished it. Ottawa does not preserve enough good buildings with history. It’s sad.

My wife, then girlfriend, worked there as a washroom attendant and in the concession stand. Saw many concerts there. A great old theater.

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24 hours ago

Lost Ottawa

Space-Age Technology in an Ottawa Beauty Parlour, October 24, 1956. It kind of looks like she has R2D2 on her head.

I wrote "Space Age," but then I looked it up and discovered this is actually almost a year before the Space Age began with the launching of Sputnik by the Soviet Union in October of 1957.

(City of Ottawa CA041307)
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Space-Age Technology in an Ottawa Beauty Parlour, October 24, 1956. It kind of looks like she has R2D2 on her head.

I wrote Space Age, but then I looked it up and discovered this is actually almost a year before the Space Age began with the launching of Sputnik by the Soviet Union in October of 1957.

(City of Ottawa CA041307)

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I loved sitting under the dryer. Like a cone of silence....you couldn’t hear all the chatter around you, warm air blowing down on you, close your eyes and have a quick nap, or read a book....in absolute peace. LOL

Lol "R2D2 on her head" . Good one

The loghts lights on theside the side are too much. They look like fins or thrusters.

And all the ladies would be asleep in a line under the dryers on Saturday morning...because they came from their cottages to their shopping....I was a shampoo boy at my moms salon back then . .. late 60's ....lol

My late wife was a hairdresser in Ottawa, Truro and Dartmouth, NS, and she recalled these old hairdryers. They were quite noisy and the attendant used to have to shout to the dryee.

I'm wondering now if all that heat on the the scalp was a safe thing to do?

Actually the Space Age began with the launching of various earlier rockets into Space.

Looks like my mum at the hairdressers.

this was likely the inspiration for Sputnik...

Look at the length of her ears.

Scott you did not have to tell everyone that I started to work when I was ten. Lol

We even owned table top models for the home!!

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1 day ago

Lost Ottawa

Kids and their teachers go for a walk in front of W.E. Gowling Public School on Anna Street in the Vets (just south of Carling and Merivale in November of 1955.

The school and the neighbourhood was then still new.

(City of Ottawa Archives CA035119)
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Kids and their teachers go for a walk in front of W.E. Gowling Public School on Anna Street in the Vets (just south of Carling and Merivale in November of 1955.

The school and the neighbourhood was then still new.

(City of Ottawa Archives CA035119)

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The school was named in 1946 for educator W.E. Gowling, who had served on the public shool board since 1909, and had been Chairman three times. Mr. Gowling was also known for running Ottawa Business College (Later Gowling Business College) in the early 1900s. (Lawyer Gordon Gowling, of Gowling & Henderson, was his son.) Here is a 1917 photo of the college, at Bank and Wellington (LAC MIKAN 3319129)

I was there K-8 and still have vivid memories of some of my teachers. Used to love those rare occasions when we would take our classes outside under the massive elm tree at the far end of the schoolyard. Good times!

I couldn't go for a walk that day I had a detention. Great pic thanks for the memory......Bruce

1958 view of area, courtesy of GeoOttawa.

Having lived in the military housing on bases, this neighborhood reminds me of the base PMQs. Most of the veterans occupying these homes probably experienced similar housing, so these types of neighborhoods would have been familiar.

Went there in Gr 4-8. / 1954-1958. Had Mr Presley just as Elvis was becoming famous. I was a patrol at Anna and Merivale

Sure looks different without the trees.

Oh how I remember that view. We lived across the street form the school at 249 Anna. I attended from Grade 1 when it first opened to grade 6 and then off to Connaught for 7 and 8. This picture would have been taken close to the intersection with Marshall Ave. which is where the Safety Patrols would use their arms and stop signs to allow safe crossing of the road.

Started kindergarten there in 1958 and went thru to grade 8. Loved the shop classes. Still have some of the things I made

Dad delivered the mail there when this picture was taken. I was 1 year & 10 months old...

Looks a lot like the two military bases we lived on. Beautiful neighbourhood today.

I taught there from 2004 to 2010. Wonderful staff team and lots of great students.

I live there now and can see my little house in this photo... my tree is so big and beautiful. What a difference. Thanks for sharing.

My sister and I walked there from Kingston Ave in the early 60’s along Merivale Rd. We were 5 & 6. Today๐Ÿ˜‚

I attended that school for kindergarten right through to grade 8!

Deep River! Wartime 4s n 6s. No trees n lots of kids. Uniformity, none of this pesky inclusion and diversity.

Attended from kindergarten to grade 8!! Lots of good memories!

A similar scene today would be Vimy Ridge P.S. in the Findlay Creek neighbourhood. (Vimy Ridge P.S. “replaced” Elizabeth Park P.S. which primarily served students living at CFB Uplands)

Went there from Kindergarten to grade 4 in the 80s.

When I was at Agincourt school they used to take us by bus once a week to Gowling so we could have a home economics class. Agincourt did not have sewing machines or stoves so we had to go to Gowling.

Was there 99-03 Senior kindergarten to grade 4

Named after a Wesley Ernest Gowling who was a school board member for many years.

We weren't even born in 1955... but this picture reminds me of when you lived across the street Anne Lightbourn

I lived in Carleton Heights and was bused there for grade 7 and 8

The only thing that changed from 1955 to when I lived there are the cars. ๐Ÿ˜‚

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2 days ago

Lost Ottawa

Those of us who remember the 60s and 70s also remember what computers in Ottawa were like in those days -- huge!

So when I came across this one-minute clip ...

I'm told that, even though this computer was used for the 1967 Canadian census, it might not have been owned by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics (as Stats Canada was once known), but rented from one of the many firms that grew up at the time to serve the federal government's computing needs.

What say you venerable computer nerds?!

(NFB Archives Clip 52644)
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Back then, they predicted that by year 2000, everyone would have a computer in their homes. I used to laugh at that prediction. Where wold we store them? Those things are as big as houses ! I'm not laughing anymore....๐Ÿ˜ณ

My father was a college teacher at Algonquin Lees Ave campus. He taught computer programming, and on Sundays when my mom was busy he'd bring me & my brother to the "computer room" where there was a whole wall dedicated to a computer, and we'd get to draw pictures on used punch cards. This was late 70s/early 80s. By the end of that time period there were desktop computers we'd get to try out too! I didn't realize how different that experience was until much later.

Even in the 1970's, our Fortran classes at Bell High School used computer time at Compuserve (or was it Systemhouse? Dang, can't remember). I remember each of our programs was limited to a maximum of 2 seconds of execution time - plenty if you got it right, at least most of the time. The real hassle was the fact that if you'd made a simple typing mistake, it would take at least a week before you'd find out - our card decks only went out once a week, and came back about a week later. Ah, the good ol' days . . .

The entire fourth floor of the DBS, later the Main Ststistics building and finally the Main building (health Canada complained they didn’t want to be housed in a building with another’s name) was the Computer Centre for Stats. Originally constructed for these large computers.

Yes that's how big they were. Saw one 'in the flesh' at a north Ontario RADAR base. It took up the whole big room. Wall to wall computer. The room that contained it was so hot that they had huge fans blowing your hair around but it was still hot.

Had one of those at Air Materiel Command, Rockcliffe Air Base, back in the mid-fifties, and yes, it took up a whole room. Still can't get my head around the fact that you can now do all that it could do back then and much more with a little device that fits in your shirt pocket.

Worked in computer operations for Bell Canada, brings back memories.

Obviously IBM, and most views are of tapes. Based on the link, a 360/30, or maybe the /65 if later.

look at the telephone, one ring-a--ding, 2 short ring a dings,

Curious. The tape drives are IBM 2401 tape drives which were designed for the IBM 360 series. However, the glimpse of the mainframe front panel in the video does not look like it matches IBM 360 panels found on-line.

The 15th and 16th floors of Tower C, Place de Ville, housed Transport Canada headquarters' massive computer complexes. I remember writing an article on an addition to the computers in the early 1980s and got a quick tour of the place. Upstairs, in public affairs, we were still rattling away with Underwood Typemasters, Smith-Corona machines and, if you were lucky, an IBM selectric. Here is a picture of my word processor of the day.

The government had large-scale mainframe computers in-house in the late 1960's. In 1969 I worked as a systems programmer at the government's Computer Services Bureau, which had a large IBM computer in the basement of the Confederation Building, serving multiple government departments. Large computer-dependent departments, such as Revenue Canada and Statistics Canada would have had their own mainframes. There were only two independent computer service companies in Ottawa at that date. Computel was founded in 1967 but did not use IBM computers. SDL was founded in 1968, so could not been filmed in 1967. gfierheller.ca/systems-dimensions-limited-sdl/ IBM had its own small datacentre on Laurier Avenue near Elgin. I had previously used the large IBM mainframe computer at the University of Toronto and would go back in 1970 to work for four years on IBM 360 computers, including being able to operate them, participate in systems assurance, investigate security breaches (not yet called hacking), and do system generations. We were still carrying programs and data around in drawers full of punched cards, as well as using the tapes shown in this clip and the early versions of disk drives.

Terrance McGrath you were there back in the day

Lee B Wainwright you might like this post.

Eric Weiner

Mike Billows

Liz Nash Tara Gee ๐Ÿ˜€

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2 days ago

Lost Ottawa

It's a party and you're invited -- to the official launch of Paul Weber's latest album, entitled Ode To Gerry Barber. The launch will take place on Facebook Live this Saturday at 5 pm, weather permitting (since the performers will be outside, while you are inside at your computer!)

Paul is an Ottawa musician who has put together several songs about Ottawa past and present. We've featured several of them over the past few months including the Ode (which is a hoot), and also his song about the Great Fire of 1870.

Once launched, you can buy the album as a CD, or as a digital download. The digital version of the album, available on Bandcamp, contains a bonus track, and comes with an uncensored version of the โ€œOde to Gerry Barberโ€, where Gerry Barber Junior speaks a more accurate version of what his dad would have said.

Check out the Facebook invite at:

www.facebook.com/events/467665674202667/

And learn more about Paul and his songs at:

www.paulweber.ca/index.html
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Its a party and youre invited -- to the official launch of Paul Webers latest album, entitled Ode To Gerry Barber. The launch will take place on Facebook Live this Saturday at 5 pm, weather permitting (since the performers will be outside, while you are inside at your computer!)

Paul is an Ottawa musician who has put together several songs about Ottawa past and present. Weve featured several of them over the past few months including the Ode (which is a hoot), and also his song about the Great Fire of 1870.

Once launched, you can buy the album as a CD, or as a digital download. The digital version of the album, available on Bandcamp, contains a bonus track, and comes with an uncensored version of the  โ€œOde to Gerry Barberโ€, where Gerry Barber Junior speaks a more accurate version of what his dad would have said.

Check out the Facebook invite at:

https://www.facebook.com/events/467665674202667/

And learn more about Paul and his songs at:

http://www.paulweber.ca/index.html

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What’s the name of the motorcycle group?

Earl Barber any relation to Gerry Barber?

I assume that the MC are either Satan’s Choice or Outlaws.

Right on paul

Congrats Paul! All best wishes.

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3 days ago

Lost Ottawa

Your Evening Commute, from Sparks street downtown to Lindenlea in Rockcliffe via an Ottawa streetcar in what looks like the late 1940s or early '50s.

That's quite a few people trying to get on. Can't say I miss that particular rush hour experience (which I experienced on the buses, streetcars and subways of Ottawa, Toronto, London, Boston and Berlin)

Lindenlea, meanwhile, gets the credit for being Ottawa's first planned community. It was designed by famous British architect Thomas Adams on the "garden home" plan, with large backyards. The upper part was built shortly after World War 1 . The lower part was built later.

(LAC e999916787)
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Your Evening Commute, from Sparks street downtown to  Lindenlea in Rockcliffe via an Ottawa streetcar in what looks like the late 1940s or early 50s. 

Thats quite a few people trying to get on. Cant say I miss that particular rush hour experience (which I experienced on the buses, streetcars and subways of Ottawa, Toronto, London, Boston and Berlin)

Lindenlea, meanwhile, gets the credit for being Ottawas first planned community. It was designed by famous British architect Thomas Adams on the garden home plan, with large backyards. The upper part was built shortly after World War 1 . The lower part was built later.

(LAC e999916787)

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Photo most likely from 1945. The United Welfare Campaign started on September 17 that year.

Oh my goodness! It is just like trying to get on the #7 bus last fall, once the LRT came into effect! ๐Ÿ˜‚๐Ÿ˜‚๐Ÿ˜‚

I love looking at these old photos in hopes I catch a glimpse of a family member or my parents friends.

I remember seeing those paving stones on Bank Street long after OTC's streetcars, rails and overhead wires were taken down. In spring, when the pavement had been plowed away here and there, they showed up like croci.

With streetcars, there was cobblestone. Ottawa's cobblestone disappeared as soon as the tracks were lifted. I had one memory of cobblestone and it must have been from the spring of 1959.

I grew up in Lindenlea -- a magical place. Took that street car all the time. Great memories!

I grew up in Lindenlea and loved it and loved streetcars. Our home was at the end of the Lindenlea line where there was a loop and the streetcar was on its way back to Ottawa.

I’m sure my mother took that streetcar, from Lindenlea to Sandy Hill to see her beau, my pop!

My first look at this was all the womens skirts the same length. What was it? One inch below the knee...lol....Does anyone remember the machine that cleaned the streetcar rails from snow and slush during the winter . brutal ....some cities still have the streetcars...Good for them....

And just as packed during rush hour as the buses are these days. Seems nothing changes some times.

Looks like 99% women waiting to get on and already on the streetcar.

Is it just me or are all the passengers women?

Having worked for Library & Archives as an archive technician they keep accurate records of dates of all archival material including photos and therefore the exact year of this photo should be available.

Must have been a rather exclusive community.

Looks like a lot of women off and on the streetcar...

Been there too ,I don't miss the standing loads

Was the United Welfare Campaign the one-curser to the Red Feather/United Way/GCWCC? Or was it a war effort?

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4 days ago

Lost Ottawa

The Historical Society of Ottawa kicks off its annual speaker series this Wednesday, September 17, at 7 pm.

This year the speaker series will be virtual and take place via Zoom so you can watch and listen to the talk on your computer at home.

Get the detail about how to register below.What is it they say...
"One man's trash is another man's treasure..."?

That certainly holds true when it comes to the intriguing treasures unlocked when archivists delve into the often centuries-old contents of the "geniza" in Jewish synagogues and cemeteries around the world, including here in Ottawa.

Time's running out to sign up for the very first of our Fall 2020 HSO Virtual Speaker Series presentations.

Visit our website for full details and the link to pre-register:
www.historicalsocietyottawa.ca/activities/meetings
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The Historical Society of Ottawa kicks off its annual speaker series this Wednesday, September 17, at 7 pm.

This year the speaker series will be virtual and take place via Zoom so you can watch and listen to the talk on your computer at home. 

Get the detail about how to register below.

4 days ago

Lost Ottawa

Good Morning Kanata! I'm not sure what street, but I am pretty sure this is Kanata in the late 1960s, not too long after construction of Kanata started on the west side of Ottawa's greenbelt in 1964.

Looks like they have some cool Teron homes and some cool cars.

Once the Queensway got this far, they could join the traffic jam on the way to work downtown!

(LAC e999917640)
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Good Morning Kanata! Im not sure what street, but I am pretty sure this is Kanata in the late 1960s, not too long after construction of Kanata started on the west  side of Ottawas greenbelt in 1964.

Looks like they have some cool Teron homes and some cool cars. 

Once the Queensway got this far, they could join the traffic jam on the way to work downtown!

(LAC e999917640)

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Image of Beaverbrook Lane & Teron as suggested by others. Some side structures seem gone and light fixtures changed but residences are the same with windows and doors lining up. Cars also not as nice as OP image. ๐Ÿ™‚

First street in Kanata being built 1964-5) Tiffany Crescent and Tiffany Place) with Alice Wilson woods on the right.

Definitely looks like Beaverbrook Lane. So cool.

It's Beaverbrook Lane, close to the corner of Beaverbrook and Teron. It looks much the same , with fewer trees now.

I hope these homes have maintained their cool 60s modern aesthetic.

Kanata is a great place to live. So many wonderful memories. Miss the place.

My dad and grandparents briefly owned a home in White’s Farm. My grandmother loved it there having grown up in Kemptville. My grandfather found it too far to commute to the Loeb’s warehouse for work and made them move. My grandmother was always upset they didn’t stay there for longer because their house and land was on what eventually became the Kanata Town Centre. I won’t get into the time my grandmother also had an opportunity to buy the land the Westgate Shopping Centre is on and my grandfather said no to that, too. ๐Ÿคฆ๐Ÿป‍โ™€๏ธ

we lived in Jackson Court in the late '70's and '80's....LOVED it....Express Bus downtown was superb...20, 25 minutes to NDHQ

Love this! I can see a school friends house where I used to hang out!

We lived on Beaverbrook Lane when newlyweds in the 80's ๐Ÿ™‚

Beaver Brooke Lane. The garages have since been torn down and only parking lots exist

Loved growing up in Kanata...great memories. โค๏ธ. I lived on Kingsford Court...went to Leacock PS and Earl of March SS ๐Ÿ˜Š

Beaver brook lane for sure, the house I lived in is just out of sight on the right of the picture, beside the garage

It's either Beaverbrook Lane, or Leacock.

Beaver brook lane. I lived their twice in my life. I’m the early 90’s and in the early 2010’s

Pretty sure this is Beaverbrook Lane. I lived on it in the mid 60's.

Hey Rebecca, flash back about 36 years to our old street. Gabriel this is where we lived when you were a toddler, before we went to California for a few months.

Best community in Ottawa to this day. I grew up on Riopelle CRT in Beaverbrook!

Walk across the street to what was Kanata Tavern and Macs Milk

Looks like a 67-68 mustang way in the back.

Yup, the street is Beaverbrook Lane, behind the Mall.

Beaverbrook Lane . It's a private road

Beaverbrook Lane, I grew up on the street. The garages aren’t there now though.

Notice how all the cars are parked sideways in the driveways? Likely because the driveways were too short for the looooong cars of the day. D’oh!

Not familiar with Kanata neighbourhoods but being a fan of large cars, like that '63 Mercury ahead of the '68 Firebird....

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5 days ago

Lost Ottawa

Workmen on the job in downtown Ottawa, finishing changes the Laurier Avenue Bridge so that the Driveway could pass under the it and continue up to Confederation Square. The date is August 27, 1929.

Previously, there was no road under the bridge. The Driveway turned left at this point and ended at Elgin Street.

Just one of many made to the city by the Federal District Commission, predecessor to the NCC.

(LAC e999908748)
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Workmen on the job in downtown Ottawa, finishing changes the Laurier Avenue Bridge so that the Driveway could pass under the it and continue up to Confederation Square. The date is August 27, 1929. 

Previously, there was no road under the bridge. The Driveway turned left at this point and ended at Elgin Street. 

Just one of many  made to the city by the Federal District Commission, predecessor to the NCC.

(LAC e999908748)

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Here is a 1933 view, courtesy of ssimpkin.carto.com, photo number A4571_61 (cropped). The Driveway makes it's way under the bridge and then up to Wellington while passing through where the NAC was later constructed circa 1965-1966.

1928 view of area, courtesy of GeoOttawa. Indeed, The Driveway takes a left turn at the Laurier Avenue Bridge and then heads over to end at Elgin.

This is not long after the Russell House Hotel burn down and was demolished, the canal turning basin was filled in, and Dey's Arena (next to this bridge and former home of the Ottawa Senators) was demolished. Big changes!

As it does again today because of one way from Elgin down to main entrance of NAC and stage door

5 days ago

Lost Ottawa

I was was shopping on eBay ... and found the Morning Puzzler! It takes the form of "Sergeant Servo", who seems to have been a resident of DND headquarters in downtown Ottawa.

Former military folks can explain ... ?
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I was was shopping on eBay ... and found the Morning Puzzler! It takes the form of Sergeant Servo, who seems to have been a resident of DND headquarters in downtown Ottawa.

Former military folks can explain ... ?

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Found this in the Red Deer Advocate from Wednesday Jun 29, 1983.

On weekends he moonlights as a jukebox.

A reference to Mystery Science Theater?

Wasn't there a 'Sgt Electro' somewhere too?

I think he dabbled in techno in the 90s ๐Ÿ˜‰ youtu.be/CpEXlmrlY0c

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