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5 hours ago

Lost Ottawa

How not to park in Lost Ottawa -- in the ditch!

Or maybe we could say "don't get caught in the Vortex!"

This mishap happened on what looks like the Aylmer Road. Somewhere in Aylmer anyway, back in the winter of 1956 when people still heated with fuel oil. I so remember the smell of the home deliveries.

Also, I would like to laugh at this poor sap, but I did exactly this out in the country one day, thinking I was pulling a u-ey. The road seemed more than wide enough. Really wide, actually. Unfortunately, that was because the road grader had filled the ditch and made it perfectly flat. It looked like the road but it wasn't.

I would have been totally stranded in the freezing cold (in the days before we all had cell phones and roadside assistance). Nice man in a pickup was able to pull me out.

(City of Ottawa Archives CA037113)
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How not to park in Lost Ottawa -- in the ditch! 

Or maybe we could say dont get caught in the Vortex!

This mishap happened on what looks like the Aylmer Road. Somewhere in Aylmer anyway, back in the winter of 1956 when people still heated with fuel oil. I so remember the smell of the home deliveries.

Also, I would like to laugh at this poor sap, but I did exactly this out in the country one day, thinking I was pulling a u-ey. The road seemed more than wide enough. Really wide, actually. Unfortunately, that was because  the road grader had filled the ditch and made it perfectly flat. It looked like the road but it wasnt. 

I would have been totally stranded in the freezing cold (in the days before we all had cell phones and roadside assistance). Nice man in a pickup was able to pull me out.

(City of Ottawa Archives CA037113)

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Last ad in the paper was in 1964. This is from 1949.

Some folks still heat that way

Probably texting and driving 😏

It looks like he just slid off the road. . .

6 hours ago

Lost Ottawa

Somebody's got to do it ... shovel the Ottawa snow off the War Memorial. Here's a guy doing it old school with a shovel circa 1959.

(LAC e999904844-u)
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Somebodys got to do it ... shovel the Ottawa snow off the War Memorial. Heres a guy doing it old school with a shovel circa 1959.

(LAC e999904844-u)

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Looks like they moved to a peaceful cemetary. No buildings, roads or cars.

All elm trees have disappeared...

The unknown shoveller.

Nice looking picture

curious as to how one clears the snow off of stairs "new school"..

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17 hours ago

Lost Ottawa

You know those buildings beside Rideau Falls along the Ottawa River? Ever wonder about their history?

Here's a video on the topic you'll find interesting. It's from Jill Heinerth, Explorer-in-Residence at the Royal Canadian Geographical Society (that now occupies the site).
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Video image

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a lot of missing truth, I learned the meaning of ottawa was where three rivers meet

Power plant

not a word of th n rsee

18 hours ago

Lost Ottawa

Towers wasn't the only Ottawa shopping plaza to have auctions in 1962. Westgate, too!

This is a follow-up to our previous post, but the same question applies. How did the auction work, what did you bid on? Was it for charity? Or just a promotion to get you into the stores.

Shared by Heather McDougall, who writes:

"Westgate is still standing but it’s changed a lot. Here's some auction money from 1962. I don’t know what the auction was all about. Anybody remember?"
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Towers wasnt the only Ottawa shopping plaza to have auctions in 1962. Westgate, too!

This is a follow-up to our previous post, but the same question applies. How did the auction work, what did you bid on? Was it for charity?  Or just a promotion to get you into the stores.

Shared by Heather McDougall, who writes:

Westgate is still standing but it’s changed a lot.  Heres some auction money from 1962. I don’t know what the auction was all about. Anybody remember?

Comment on Facebook

when any place was over stocked and has/d to make space for the incomming, you get a clearout, similiar to jobs

18 hours ago

Lost Ottawa

Heather McDougall shares the Evening Puzzler, writing:

"I found this in an old wallet. It’s dated 1962. Anybody remember these auctions?"

And the puzzler is, how did the auction work, and what did you bid on?
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Heather McDougall shares the Evening Puzzler, writing:

I found this in an old wallet. It’s dated 1962. Anybody remember these auctions?

And the puzzler is, how did the auction work, and what did you bid on?

Comment on Facebook

Was 12 years old and our family was there. It was held in the parking lot out front. Mom got a blanket. They were the first store to open in our end of town. We were so happy and loved it. I attended Putman when they had grand opening. We walked over at lunch hour for free hot dogs. Still remember how great the store coming was. We were in the boonies back then.

What is Freimart?

I would like to bid on the Salisbury steakette, peas and mashed potatoes at the Shopper's City Restaurant.

1 day ago

Lost Ottawa

Now that winter has returned, I guess the use of these shelters will resume in and around Ottawa (if kids are still going to school).

We never had a shelter when we were taking the bus to Sir Robert Borden (which was strange because Sir John A was literally a five-minute walk way. However, that was Ottawa and we lived in Nepean).

Despite the cold beginning, every day on the bus seemed to be a new adventure as hilarity ensued.

This sentry box was put up by a farmer on the Chesterville Road in 1957. I've never heard of the road, but Chesterville is in farming country about 45 minutes southeast of Ottawa.

(City of Ottawa Archives CA042822)
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Now that winter has returned, I guess the use of these shelters will resume in and around Ottawa (if kids are still going to school).

We never had a shelter when we were taking the bus to Sir Robert Borden (which was strange because Sir John A was literally a five-minute walk way. However, that was Ottawa and we lived in Nepean). 

Despite the cold beginning, every day on the bus seemed to be a new adventure as hilarity ensued.

This sentry box was put up by a farmer on the Chesterville Road in 1957. Ive never heard of the road, but Chesterville is in farming country about 45 minutes southeast of Ottawa.

(City of Ottawa Archives CA042822)

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I remember the cold when passing by Sir John A to go to Greenbank. For some reason, they closed the public school in Graham Park, and all of us on the Nepean side had to travel far afield.

I grew up in Chesterville and asked my Dad to build on for us at the end of the road, but he cleared a thicket in between two big trees instead. Ah well, still worked.

We stood behind a tree to block the wind no matter which direction it came from we had protection. Now most kids with a longer lane get drives.

I have seen these along the roads for many years and now I finally know what they are for. I learned something new today.

Yup, I remember the cold walk down Greenbank to Sir John A, watching all the kids going to SRB.

I grew up outside of Ottawa and wanted my dad to build one of these so bad! He never did. We had a big white pine I sometimes sheltered under.

We stood in front of the tallest kid....lol....we walked out a long laneway and down the main, rural road to a crossroads. No trees or shelter....brrrr

They are up all year round now. I saw a great one that was a Tardis

There are still quite a few of these “ waiting for the school bus protecters” around the Inkerman, Winchester, Chesterville, Morewood vicinity today.

Saw a lot of these when we were kids... nowadays they just sit there with the kids in the running Cadillac Escalade waiting for the school bus 😁

Yeah, I grew up in Chestetville area and quite a few people have them, especially ones with long driveways :p

I still walk my kid to school even if its a snow day even if its -40 with the wind we go, its not that far but its a good 20minute walk

In grade school i walked half a mile to catch my bus and crossed over a high way too.

They are still very common in rural areas. I also went to SRB but was able to walk or bike from Meadowbank Rd.

That is a very large barn for the times It would be interesting where it was I started school in 1958 and walked to school until I was in grade 8. Very few places would have bus sh

We have these out our way, some of them are painted and decorated like tiny homes.

I’ve seen these all my life and always wondered what they were for. My guess was a shelter for the butler to valet cars. This makes infinitely more sense lol

This would make amazing wall art

I see some on my way to West in Dunrobin where my daughter goes.

All over the valley

What's a shelter? We just walked 2 km and stood in the gale force wind. This would be about 1990.

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2 days ago

Lost Ottawa

A bus looks like it's trying to scoop an Ottawa streetcar for passengers at the corner of Carling and Bank Street ... when Carling still met Bank Street in 1934.

I'm guessing that when they expanded Carling to be four lanes in the late 1950s or so, that is also when Carling east of Bronson was renamed Glebe Street.

The building on the far corner is still there, but houses La Strada restuarant, not Carleton Motor Sales.

BTW, this bus is described as an "AEC Banger Diesel." Banger? Really? Truth in auto names?

(City of Ottawa Archives CA018249)
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A bus looks like its trying to scoop an Ottawa streetcar for passengers at the corner of Carling and Bank Street ... when Carling still met Bank Street in 1934.

Im guessing that when they expanded Carling to be four lanes in the late 1950s or so, that is also when Carling east of Bronson was renamed Glebe Street. 

The building on the far corner is still there, but houses La Strada restuarant, not Carleton Motor Sales.

BTW, this bus is described as an AEC Banger Diesel. Banger? Really? Truth in auto names?

(City of Ottawa Archives CA018249)

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Here is photo of the Imperial Gas station across the street in 1945. The station was built in 1925. It was demolished and re-built in 1956.

Glebe street was named after 1976 for sure. That's when I left the neighbourhood.

The Carling telephone exchange office opened in the Glebe in 1914 was named for the former Carling Avenue there. (It was actually a block away, on the SW corner of Bank and First.) From the Citizen, June 22, 1914:

In the mid-1950s JAD's Hobby Shop occupied 695 bank, and by 1964 Professional Guitar Studios had opened, however in 1965 it was Metro Music, with Bob Sabourin. The store is still there...

I remember taking the bus in the 60’s and it came all the way up Carling turning north on Bank

There was an elevator that could lift cars from floor to floor. After the war the top floor was used by military cadets. So I have been told.

Ahem, Glebe Avenue, not St. I grew up about 100m from where this photo was taken. No idea it had ever been a car dealership. Willys?

That's too bad. La Strada is a horrible restaurant that I got food poisoning and that nobody took responsibility for it

I lived right there on the 3rd floor corner window in 1982.

Looks like an Imperial gas station across the street- now a Popeyes Chicken

If this was in the late '50's, I'm surprised that that bus was still running! It certainly doesn't look shipshape.

I'd like to know who came up with the awnings idea? I remember shreds fluttering in the 60's. πŸ˜†

πŸ˜‚

AEC Ranger, not Banger, tho I’m sure it did. πŸ˜‚

The name change, from Carling to Glebe, seems to have been in late 1973 or early 1974.

I should have said bus 🚌 sorry.

πŸ˜„

Remember when we took the to Lasalle high school together. One day we waited to see at the Chateau Laurier one of the Astronaut that gad gone to the moon. Was it Glenn .

Are you sure that's the right corner... I don't see a red light camera there.

Glebe Avenue.

No. Carling Ave became Glebe Ave as part of the traffic calming program in the 70s and 80s. The idea was that psychologically, driving straight up Carling across Bronson until you got to Bank Street felt normal, but changing the name (at a point where Carling changed from a commercially zoned street to a residential one) would make drivers think. At the same time new Glebe Ave, got bumpouts that narrowed the street at the Bronson corner. Where the ladies are waiting for the bus would be a service station, later Kentucky Fried Chicken. www.glebereport.ca/wp-content/uploads/2011/12/Glebe_Report_1973_09_14_v01_n03.pdf

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2 days ago

Lost Ottawa

Nick Hauser shares a story about the restoration of several items that will be familiar to many former (not old!) Ottawa bus-riders.

Part of OCTranspo's historical collection. Who can forget the 1A?

Writes Nick:

"Fresh off the bench! After 8 years, these old Ottawa Transportation Commission sign boxes are ready for service again!

They hung in the side windows of the CC&F Brills, GM Old Looks and Twin Coach buses, usually in the first door-side window.

Two varieties have been identified, sharing similar looks and parts.

Boxes 1A, 1B, and 59 are one style (note the 59 has another paint variation -- a green face). Boxes 02 and 03 are a different version.

All the components were cleaned, and made operational again to be enjoyed for years to come!"
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Nick Hauser shares a story about the restoration of several items that will be familiar to many former (not old!) Ottawa bus-riders. 

Part of OCTranspos historical collection. Who can forget the 1A? 

Writes Nick:

Fresh off the bench! After 8 years, these old Ottawa Transportation Commission sign boxes are ready for service again!

They hung in the side windows of the CC&F Brills, GM Old Looks and Twin Coach buses, usually in the first door-side window.

Two varieties have been identified, sharing similar looks and parts.

Boxes 1A, 1B, and 59 are one style (note the 59 has another paint variation -- a green face). Boxes 02 and 03 are a different version.

All the components were cleaned, and made operational again to be enjoyed for years to come!

Comment on Facebook

huge thumbs up to people putting in the time to preserve history

Didn’t originally all the N/S routes use odd numbers and E/W routes even?

I remember the 1 and 1A very well. Also the # 4

I used to take the 1A along Bank Street to Summerside and to Carleton University. Always packed at 7:30 a.m. and 4 - 6 p.m.

We should have a display at the Science and Technology museum if not an OC Transpo museum by itself for all this kind of memorabilia, including the vehicles themselves, with an example of each one, including street cars, buses, and whatever else came before them. Just saying. πŸ€“

I remember the 1A which turned off Bank at Sunnyside and went to Carleton....I can only remember the other going straight down to Heron as being the number 1...never heard of a 1B must have been before my time

I sure remeber those. Nice to see them preserved.

I remember many, many days and nights freezing my ass off waiting for the OC bus.

.

..

.

The bus operator always had to keep an eye on these sign boxes as there would be the occasional miscreant who managed to "flip" the route number on the sly. This was a perennial problem with signs located at the rear of the bus.

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2 days ago

Lost Ottawa

Not long ago we had a picture of several gents waiting for the Colonial bus on the northeast corner of Albert and Elgin. That's where the inter-city bus station was in the 1920s.

The sign said passengers could go to places like Kemptville, Prescott, and Iroquois.

This seems to be the Colonial bus that would take you there in 1927. Classy!

It's parked outside of the station (the windows at left). The entrance to the Russell Theatre is to the right, and this whole block was demolished a year or so after the picture was taken.

(Bytown Museum 2014.004.01.97.01)

#ottawa, #bytown Museum, #lost Ottawa
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Not long ago we had a picture of several gents waiting for the Colonial bus on the northeast corner of Albert and Elgin. Thats where the inter-city bus station was in the 1920s.

The sign said passengers could go to places like Kemptville, Prescott, and Iroquois.

This seems to be the Colonial bus that would take you there in 1927. Classy! 

Its parked outside of the station (the windows at left). The entrance to the Russell Theatre is to the right, and this whole block was demolished a year or so after the picture was taken.

(Bytown Museum 2014.004.01.97.01)

#Ottawa, #Bytown Museum, #Lost Ottawa

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We used to travel by Colonial Bus Lines often during the '50's. The bus went right by our farm - about 10 ft from the front door of the house. You just went to the end of the driveway and flagged it down. Door-to-door service between Ottawa and Montreal.

We used to travel Colonial Coach from the old Albert Terminal to see our grandparents every Xmas, on the Orange 'n Black GM coaches in the early fifties before my parents bought their first car! πŸ˜‰

Good photo I like the bus 😎

Established in 1927, Colonial Coach initially ran to Kingston, Prescott and Brockville. By 1930, following acquisition of several smaller bus operations, it had become the "largest motor coach line in the Dominion". It started operating to Montreal in that year. Service to Almonte, Arnprior, Carleton Place, Smiths Falls and Renfrew also started in 1930. We see it here possibly parked at its "terminal" at 21 Elgin Street, just before its move to Little Sussex Street in 1930. By 1932 Colonial Coach was operating 3 services daily to and from Kemptville, Prescott, Brockville, and Kingston, with 2 daily services to Montreal, Williamsburg, and Morrisburg. There were also daily services to Toronto, New York, and Detroit. Service to North Bay was started in 1936. A four-hour "express" run to Montreal was started in 1936.

Very interesting

Hussein Mahmoud, here's one for you!

Now we know where the Hummer Limos get their looks from πŸ™‚

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3 days ago

Lost Ottawa

Our last "Sunday Parking" of the day, this time behind the Ottawa Civic Hospital.

This person is going to end up with a huge parking fee. The car has sunk in the mud!

I do like the verandas on the hospital!

(City of Ottawa Archives CA037762)
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Our last Sunday Parking of the day, this time behind the Ottawa Civic Hospital.

This person is going to end up with a huge parking fee. The car has sunk in the mud!

I do like the verandas on the hospital!

(City of Ottawa Archives CA037762)

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I was also born there too, before health care, they sent my Mom home to get some money before they would deliver me.

I was born there.

Back then I bet patients could park there. Don’t think there were stupid parking fees then.

Looks like a 1952 Mercury, the same year I was born there!

I'm trying to figure what side of the civic that is.

I was born there too. Cool shot of the balconies. I stayed there for a bit as a child and was on them often.

As great as the old cars were, once they left the paved road - forget about it πŸ˜›

I was born there too, and my Grandparents lived behind the Hospital on Reid Ave.

I trained there as a lab technologist. Good hospital.

Born there, trained there maybe die there!

I was born there too.

My brother was born there in 1946!😳

Ruskin Ave

Maybe a little Spring thaw ? 😯

I remember sitting out on one of those with my aunt.

My grandson was born there πŸ˜‰

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