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2 hours ago
Lost Ottawa

Don Wiggans shares a boy and a bike from 1966, plus an Ottawa school you might know at the corner of Gloucester and Bay.

Writes Don:

"Centennial School opened it's doors September 1966, welcoming the children of Centretown. It was open to all children including deaf students and those with physical disabilities and. Here is a pic from my mom's slides of me coming home from Centennial on my Mustang bike in 1966."
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Don Wiggans shares a boy and a bike from 1966, plus an Ottawa school you might know at the corner of Gloucester and Bay.

Writes Don:

Centennial School opened its doors September 1966, welcoming the children of Centretown. It was open to all children including deaf students and those with physical disabilities and. Here is a pic from my moms slides of me coming home from Centennial on my Mustang bike in 1966.

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All that open sky in the background now covered by buildings

14 hours ago
Lost Ottawa

Postcard from Ottawa, looking south down King Edward Avenue, circa 1905-1910, after the Ottawa Improvement Commission had given the street a beautification. Those saplings would grow up to make a nice tree-lined park in the middle of the street.

The fire station is still there and used as a residence, sans tower.

The postcard might also show why there was a boulevard in the first place. The park was over the top of a major sewer -- a descendent of the By Wash that once ran through the market and down King Eddy and was used to help drain the Rideau Canal.
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Postcard from Ottawa, looking south down King Edward Avenue, circa 1905-1910, after the Ottawa Improvement Commission had given the street a beautification.  Those saplings would grow up to make a nice tree-lined park in the middle of the street.

The fire station is still there and used as a residence, sans tower.

The postcard might also show why there was a boulevard in the first place. The park was over the top of a major sewer -- a descendent of the By Wash that once ran through the market and down King Eddy and was used to help drain the Rideau Canal.

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Here’s the fire station as it is today: goo.gl/maps/h1Ef2LGGZMAfdwq99

Here is another view of former Fire Station No. 5 (circa 1937) with its impressive tower.

Loved it when it was lined with trees!

Nice looking picture

The source of the shit smell in the Rideau LRT station

The modern day version of King Edward is nothing but big semis making their way from point to point almost non stop 24/7.

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1 day ago
Lost Ottawa

There's often a story to go with the name of an Ottawa street, and the Gloucester Historical Society will have online presentation of some of those stories via Zoom on weekend.

The talk will take place this Sunday, April 18, and it's at 2 pm -- so no excuses about it being too late or too early!

You'll need the Zoom link, so grab it from the poster and enjoy.The Gloucester Historical Society is making an on-line presentation on "The Stories Behind Street Names" this Sunday, April 18, 2021 at 2:00 p.m. This will cover streets east of the Rideau River. Pre-registration is required by no later than April 17th. An e-mail will be provided with the connection link. The general public is welcome to join in.
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Theres often a story to go with the name of an Ottawa street, and the Gloucester Historical Society will have online presentation of some of those stories via Zoom on weekend.

The talk will take place this Sunday, April 18, and its at 2 pm -- so no excuses about it being too late or too early!

Youll need the Zoom link, so grab it from the poster and enjoy.
1 day ago
Lost Ottawa

Ottawa from the Air in this astonishing shot shared by Darrell Larose.

Notes Darell:

"NCC aerial photo circa 1965 showing many lost buildings".
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Ottawa from the Air in this astonishing shot shared by Darrell Larose.

Notes Darell:

NCC aerial photo circa 1965 showing many lost buildings.

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Great aerial shot! Love how the Train Station was right along the canal. 🙂

I see the “temporary” buildings, the buildings replaced by the Rideau Centre, and the Daly Building (which I still don’t understand why it was torn down - could it not have been converted into condos?! I always liked it). And train tracks going to the actual train station

I worked in the Daly building as security in the 70’s. So sad it was never restored. It was beautiful inside. Here is more about it. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daly_Building

The main losses in this photo are the Corry Bldg. and the Daly Bldg. across the street from each other. Beautiful buildings that enhanced this part of the core. Not sure what happened with the Corry, a flatiron building. The Daly Building was an imposing and solid looking building. To me it added a lot of class to the district. Some people didn’t like it but it stands out compared to what is there now. In fact, both of those buildings were major losses.

Too bad the dome on top of union station had been removed by this time.

I was born in '69, so I didn't know there was a building in the spot where the condos are now between the Chateau Laurier and Sussex!

removing our train station from downtown was a mistake. Mtl., Toronto and New York and I'm sure other cities still have trains going into their city cores.

Great shot o: When did they reroute the train out of downtown?

Love these photos. In 1966 I left from the downtown train station, and returned to Ottawa one week later, arriving at the new station. Happy memories.

Well said Barry

This might have been before 1965, as the NAC construction is not evident.

The shadows and the lack of cars adds up to this being taken on a Sunday mid-morning. Great picture.

Cool! What are those buildings located where the current US embassy is?

OMG the city actually painted the lines on the street in a white paint you can see. It’s a great picture.

Why they permitted that ugly American Embassy fortress there is beyond me!

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2 days ago
Lost Ottawa

Your Morning Commute ... to downtown Ottawa circa 1959, judging by the cars.

That car in front belonged to Stu's Driving school and might be a Dodge, but last time we had one of Stu's Dodges on Lost Ottawa it was it was black -- did something happen?

Last time we had Stu, it also turned out that quite a few people had taken their driving lessons with him and lived to tell the tale.
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Your Morning Commute ... to downtown Ottawa circa 1959, judging by the cars. 

That car in front belonged to Stus Driving school and might be a Dodge, but last time we had one of Stus Dodges on Lost Ottawa it was it was black -- did something happen? 

Last time we had Stu, it also turned out that quite a few people had taken their driving lessons with him and lived to tell the tale.

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The Dodge is a '58 (probably the bottom-of-the-line Canadian Dodge Crusader since it looks to have no chrome at all on the sides), so is the Ford Custom 300 two-door sedan behind it. Parked in the other direction on the right is what looks like a '51 or '52 Chevy.

I also took driving lessons with Stu's.

Great car designs back then. Today you can't tell the difference between a honda ford or Hyundai

I had driving lessons with Stu's driving school as well. It was somehow connected to the high school that I was going to, and there were group lessons. There were 3 of us in the car besides the instructor and we took turns driving.

Brings back vivid memories of my time in that era. Walking along Rideau Street, shopping at Freiman's and Ogilvie, going swimming at the Chateau Laurier. It was a good era.

When I was 4 years old, I would regularly take the streetcar with my Mom downtown to Stu's Driving School. I would then sit in the back seat of Stu's car quietly while Mom had her lessons.

Didn’t Downtown Rideau St look so nice and inviting back then.

I'm figuring '58 as streetcars were off the roads by May '59 and the trees look pretty filled out in the background. Also that Dodge is a '58.

Had driving lessons from Stu’s... in 70s though...a red Volkswagen Beetle with a standard...they were excellent...and I’m sure went through a few transmissions!

Stu Green lived across the street from us on Muriel in the Glebe. I remember when the "dual" was introduced. He was a fine & friendly neighbour.

Wow, lots of memories in that pic!

Oh my! A.J Freiman - Such a CLEAN street - Car on right looks like a 39 or 40 Chevy - In those years, Pontiac had the same style. They look like Fords on the other side. Such a clean shot. And to think that modernization has killed all this.

aah Wolworth's and lunches. Standing behind someone waiting to sit. And breathing heavily and standing on one foot then the other hoping to be able so sit faster. Not sure if it worked. Is that Freiman's next to it?

Darn... Ottawa should have kept some of the streetcars ... at least in the downtown core. It could have been our version of San Francisco. What absence of foresight ....

Miss the Woolworth’s lunch counter.

The "forward look", according to Chrysler.

I went too/took attended Stu's driveing school in the 60's

Love it in those days . No problem parking on Rideau street in those days 😃😃. Great good memories 🥰

Had lessons from Stu's driving school in the late 60s. My mom had also taken lessons with Stu's.

I took lessons from Stu's in 1967.

That a 57 Dodge in front and behind it is a 58 Ford

Is this Rideau St?

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3 days ago
Lost Ottawa

Image like this one were often used to illustrate the reality of urban blight in Ottawa in an effort to justify the urban renewal projects of the 1960s in Lowertown -- but what if you like derelict old trucks?

I particularly like the one on the left. Some sort of cool old military truck? Some kind of Ford on the right?

This picture appeared in a planning document from 1972 entitled Beyond the Bulldozer, which attempted evaluate the successes and failures of the urban renewal in the capital.

was used in a Ottawa planning document from 1972 to help show why parts of Lower Town needed a good does urban renewal .
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Image like this one were often used to illustrate the reality of urban blight in Ottawa in an effort to justify the urban renewal projects of the 1960s in Lowertown -- but what if you like derelict old trucks? 

I particularly like the one on the left. Some sort of cool old military truck? Some kind of Ford on the right?

This picture appeared in a planning document from 1972 entitled Beyond the Bulldozer, which attempted evaluate the successes and failures of the urban renewal in the capital. 
  
was used in a Ottawa planning document from 1972 to help show why parts of Lower Town needed a good does urban renewal .

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Just removing the trucks and renovate the houses would have been a good idea ...

Truck on the left is a CMP

Pretty lame to use pics like this then turn around and demolish iconic buildings in the downtown core which never detracted from the aesthetic of the city.

Perhaps this explains why the planning (urbanisme) committee in my rural west Québec municipality is often translated as “urban renewal”, which seems inappropriate. Lots of ancient vehicles on some properties!

Truck on the right looks like a Fargo.

If they'd waited until the 1980s, the yuppies would have renovated all these places. (Any idea where this was located?)

The Ford pickup is one year only design, ‘57.

In the South (USA), lawn ornaments are made by Chevy and GMC. No sissy Fords.

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3 days ago
Lost Ottawa

Learn something every day while doing Lost Ottawa. For example, I was pretty good at Ping Pong in the 1960s, when I thought it was a new thing. I had no idea it went back as far as 1901, as seen in this Christmas time ad for Ketchum & Co. from the Citizen.

Something to keep you busy through another lockdown.

Ketchum's -- run by brothers Harry and Zebulon -- claimed to be Canada's first sporting good store, and was once located on the northwest corner of Bank and Sparks streets. Zeb ran a sports equipment manufacturing company in Westboro for many years.
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Learn something every day while doing Lost Ottawa. For example, I was pretty good at Ping Pong in the 1960s, when I thought it was a new thing. I had no idea it went back as far as 1901, as seen in this Christmas time ad for Ketchum & Co. from the Citizen.

Something to keep you busy through another lockdown.

Ketchums -- run by brothers Harry and Zebulon -- claimed to be Canadas first sporting good store, and was once located on the northwest corner of Bank and Sparks streets. Zeb ran a sports equipment manufacturing company in Westboro for many years.

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A great sport if you have the room in your basement.

Is that what they did? I thought they made dyes for tattooing the ears of farm animals. 🤭 Where did I get that from? 😬

I believe that Ping-Pong is a trademarked UK name. Table Tennis is the name that was coined to sell that same game elsewhere.

The name "Ping Pong" is still used in certain parts of the world, particularly in the USA, probably because it was promoted so extensively in the early 1900s by Parker Brothers. Ping Pong is still a federally registered (®) trademark in the USA and is now owned by Escalade Sports. In its infancy, it went by several different names, including “whiff-whaff.” In 1901, J. Jaques & Son trademarked “ping-pong,” which they later sold to the U.S. company Parker Brothers. The company soon began enforcing the trademark. That's why the generic term “table tennis” has become the accepted name for the sport.

Gnip Gnop as it was known in the US navy.

I thought they made that popular red sauce but they spelt the name wrong

From the Citizen, April 2, 1896, the beginning:

This was actual table tennis. Look at the racquets - long handles.

Mom worked for Ketchum’s for awhile

Pretty substantial looking table, and a great price.

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3 days ago
Lost Ottawa

Dave Steers shares a fine pic of a classic Ottawa "Confectionary" on Carling just west of Island Park.

Writes Dave:

"Another Pure Spring corner store -- Located at 1142 Carling. I took the picture in 1971 and just found it again looking through old negatives I'd developed in the Lisgar Camera Club, but never printed."
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Dave Steers shares a fine pic of a classic Ottawa Confectionary on Carling just west of Island Park.

Writes Dave:

Another Pure Spring corner store -- Located at 1142 Carling.  I took the picture in 1971 and just found it again looking through old negatives Id developed in the Lisgar Camera Club, but never printed.

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I remember that store as Small’s and it was the “go to” place for candy when I was a kid living on General Avenue. Mr. Small had a lot of patience with us kids!

I grew up on Anna Ave, and seem to remember the store called "Small's" for some reason. Was Allen's surname Small? The owner of the store built a new home on the south side of Crerar at Fisher in the early sixties.

Is this really the "Small's from my youth? I lived on Crown Crescent from 1946 to 1952. The older kids took the younger kids and we headed up to Small's and purchased all the candy being discussed in these posts. I can clearly see the candy counter and the nice man behind it. I moved away at age 7 but after 68 more years I remember all the details. This post made my day. Thanks.

Located on the south side of Carling on the western corner of Stevenson Place, with Harmer on the north side. The earliest mention of Allan's Circle Bar in local newspapers was 1952, when they advertised for a short order cook, and the latest was around 1972. To the east, across Stevenson is a gas station, Westgate Gulf at 1138 Carling, In the mid-1940s R.H. Gratton Service Station operated at that location, followed by Nesbitt's Service (British American) in the 1950s. Tragically, Derry Nesbitt, 17, the son of W. Lyness Nesbitt, died at the scene in January, 1951 when he decided to spend the night in his car rather than chance driving downtown on slippery roads. Carbon monoxide was the cause. Ottawa Citizen, January 22, 1951. The BA station was taken over by Art Mackey and later by Frank Salter.

I appreciate that you commemorated the history of the name “Confectionary”, as easily half of the so-called corner stores had that misspelling on their signs. (Also “Couts” Cards, in this case!)

A huge bag of Black babies and wax lips all for a dime

Notice the sign for Uptown soda drink.

Reminds me of the jingle: Escape, come on over, to Royal Crown Cola!

It appears that it was only open for 2 hours per day. 🙂

Al Small and his wife operated the A and B Victory Store confectionery on Merivale Road during the war. Afterwards, they moved to the location shown and added a small restaurant to the store which featured Shopsy 12 inch hot dogs. Andy Anka took over the old location for his law practice. In addition to the hot dogs, I bought many a Silverwoods malted milk ice cream bar at the Circle Bar. I don't remember that sign so it must have replaced the first one that hung over the entrance.

And Risk Crown Cola too...

Remember that place when it had a few tables and dining counter .

That was my neck of the woods, growing up. Fond memories!

Nice picture

Derrick McCune

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4 days ago
Lost Ottawa

Don Myles shares our second puzler of the evening, on Ottawa's west side this time.

Writes Dond:

"Here is a strange one. I was walking on trail 12 from parking lot 3 on Corkstown Rd. More than a kilometre in, I came across this. It's huge, about 2 meters by 5 meters. Any ideas as to what it was?"
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Don Myles shares our second puzler of the evening, on Ottawas west side this time.

Writes Dond:

Here is a strange one. I was walking on trail 12 from parking lot 3 on Corkstown Rd. More than a kilometre in, I came across this. Its huge, about 2 meters by 5 meters. Any ideas as to  what it was?

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I grew up close to corkstown. There was railway and an abattoir in the area. It was all farming when I was a young girl. If there was a map that could at least show the area it would be helpful

I often use that trail and have wondered about this myself.

I 1st discovered this in the late 80’s. At the time the trail was a bit south and you had to look for this. Now the trail goes directly to it. Wondered what it was. Yes it’s near the old rail line. But it’s up a hill and if it was a scale I would think would be closer to the train tracks. I thought maybe it was used to fix machinery like tractors/trucks. You could get under them. I’ve seen framers make smaller scale ramps to work under their tractors

An early attempt at rapid transit?

Really wild guess wants to say a scale for weighing trucks, but I don't know the immediate terrain or the details in the trench

From this picture anyway, whatever it was in its former life, it looks like it was now repurposed as some sort of little bridge across something like a stream.

Thanks for the info. Saw this last fall and also took a picture because it seemed so out of place.

Looks like a basic weigh scale.

And now ya know! thx!

Frame for a train car?

Thanks everyone.

It`s a foundation for a quarry weigh-scale that likely weighed the railcars loaded with sandstone for points east into Ottawa on the railbed that followed the line behind the current day equestrian centre, and I have surmised it must have had a gravity-driven branch line that descended from the scale to connect with the mainline encircling the back of Corkstown hill.

Awesome story

If you need any more incentive to take a peek, there's a geocache hidden there too! coord.info/GCGJYJ

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4 days ago
Lost Ottawa

Hopeful we won't be needing these guys from "Ottawa Hydro Electric" anytime soon.

They're out front of the Ottawa Hydro building you can still see on King Edward between York and George ... although there is one thing lost.

Somewhere along the line they knocked out that nice arched glass window on the right and replaced it with very tall and very ugly garage door.

On the plus side, it does fit a much bigger truck!
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Hopeful we wont be needing these guys from Ottawa Hydro Electric anytime soon. 

Theyre out front of the Ottawa Hydro building you can still see on King Edward between York and George ... although there is one thing lost.

Somewhere along the line they knocked out that nice arched glass window on the right and replaced it with very tall and very ugly garage door. 

On the plus side, it does fit a much bigger truck!

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This reminds me of the Hydro building at Carling and Merivale

I suspect that Ottawa Hydro may have had a preferred architecture firm that did many of these buildings. Unfortunately this article doesn't seem to have that information. capitalcurrent.ca/city-recognizes-the-hidden-history-in-ottawas-heritage-hydro-substations/

Always thought this building would make an awesome private home.

They have an old soviet look to them. Anyone know who designed these?

These old utility buildings have so much character.

Champagne Bath next door where I spent my childhood swimming!

Yes right behind what was the Bourque building next to synagogue (Bourque non existant at that time though - built in '63)

The OP photo was taken to commemorate a photo taken from an even earlier “lost” era of Hydro Ottawa history.

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