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4 hours ago

Lost Ottawa

Saturday Shopping on Rideau Street in downtown Ottawa ... twenty years before the Rideau Centre.

I'm thinking around 1962 on account of that taxi over by the Honey Dew. I'm going way out on a limb to say a Ford Galaxie, but it seems to have some kind of funny bump over the front fender.

The Transportation Building on the corner of Sussex was still a tall building for the Ottawa of its time.

(LAC e011074450)
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Saturday Shopping on Rideau Street in downtown Ottawa ... twenty years before the Rideau Centre. 

Im thinking around 1962 on account of that taxi over by the Honey Dew. Im going way out on a limb to say a Ford Galaxie, but it seems to have some kind of funny bump over the front fender.

The Transportation Building on the corner of Sussex was still a tall building for the Ottawa of its time.

(LAC e011074450)

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Signage on the bank hadn't changed yet, though. The Bank of Commerce became the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce in 1962.

Good old Honey Dew! Many a good conversation was had over a Honey Dew lunch or just coffee. I'm sure I'm in this picture somewhere Lol!

You are safe on your limb !! It is indeed a Ford Galaxie taxi !!!

Loved the Honey Dew!

The taxi appears to be a ‘64 Ford Custom, a base model that most cab companies used. The Galaxie had fancier trim. I owned one of each years ago.

Paulette St-Jacques Pauline McNally love the photos shared on this page/group. Thought you might too

The taxi is a ‘64 Galaxie.

Love seeing the ladies dressed with their hats for shopping. It was an event then, not just something to fill time. This time together was longed planned in advance I think.

Amazing

here's a drawing of one of my favorite places in old ottawa...circa 1957...

Those were fantastic days....

Such a beautiful, clean and relaxing site. And the Honey Dew, where we would go to do homework LOLL after school (from LaSalle) - So many great hours spent there.

Freeman’s was the place we got malts. We would walk from my high school ( Rideau Convent) to a restaurant called “Delmar” after school sometimes.

Wish I could take a time machine back and walk the streets to see the city then...

It looked exactly like that in 1961 when I started working at a law office right next door to the Honey Dew at 18 Rideau. It was a beautiful and simple era.

When people dressed up to go shopping..

love it

Honey Dew Coffee β˜• Shop and Latelleir Leather - and the old MacKenzie street sign. Beautiful.

That Galaxie Taxi is a '64 Ford Custom! πŸ‘

Me...when I was walking there in 64 with my mom.....its the smell of the buses that I can't forget it....back them they had sulfur in the diesel. Rideau street was the street for shopping before the St-Laurent shopping mall.

The buildings on the right were still standing. The trains were still coming into the Union Station I would guess. No Colonel By Drive yet.

Sparks and Rideau Streets were always bustling with shoppers on Thursday nights, Friday nights and Saturday before the Rideau Centre was built.

I remember it very well.

I wish it was still this way. πŸ™

now that's what Rideau st should look like..not the mess we have now

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16 hours ago

Lost Ottawa

Mike Downey shares a picture of "ince of Wales" Bridge over the Ottawa River from 1974.

It's been this way so long you wonder what could have happened to the P and the R.
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Hung out there quite a lot in the late 70s, early 80s. Was a great place to collect pebbles for our homemade slingshots.

I once was crossing it on my bike as a kid, when the Wakefield train was heading straight for me... it was scary, fortunately it was moving slowly therefore I made it safely across!!

HAHA, I just caught on

With the dog in the corner it really reminds me of Alex Colville’s Dog on a Bridge. (Which incidentally just sold for a record $2.2 million dollars)

It was a PR disaster😳

Guess it wasn't good PR to leave them there.

CN,CP, silent Rev

Pre-graffiti

use to go see my father drive over this bridge as a boy

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1 day ago

Lost Ottawa

You never know what piece of Lost Ottawa you'll find at Grandma's house. That's where Billy Valley found this Pure Spring bottle.

Anyone have a guess about the era? Or should I say vintage?

Writes Billy:

"I came across this bottle in my Grandmother's possession and am interested in learning more about it. Pure Spring soft drinks, but do people know more?"
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You never know what piece of Lost Ottawa youll find at Grandmas house. Thats where Billy Valley found this Pure Spring bottle.

Anyone have a guess about the era? Or should I say vintage?

Writes Billy: 

I came across this bottle in my Grandmothers possession and am interested in learning more about it. Pure Spring soft drinks, but do people know more?

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Pure Spring... now there's a great emory from my childhood—Swiss Cream Soda, Lemon and Lime.

I have one like that ,holds 10 oz

Not the shape of bottle I remember from 1950s early 1960s. This bottle before that time??

Must be before my time. Sure doesn't look like a pure spring bottle that I grew up with. Anyone know what flavour this was?

An Ottawa soft-drink company. If my memory is right, the spring water used in production came from a natural spring at the southeast corner of Lebreton Flats beneath Nanny Goat Hill. David Jeanes would know more.

Is there a date on the bottom of the bottle. Probably one of their first bottles they produced. Pure Spring was started in1925.

Not sure, but I have still a wooden box of EB eddy matches still .

Steve, you must know about this bottle.

The bottle is 1920`s or 30. After 1940 all bottles had to be dated and marked with how many ounces. A few of my bottles from 1930`s to 70`s.

If anyone out there happens to be a bottle collector, feel free to drop me a message btw. My Grandmother's planning a move out to BC this summer and is looking to offload the bottle before then.

I was lucky enough to find a 1933 intact with cap Quebec maple syrup bottle in the woods.

Bottle from 1920's.

Wow. I'd fight someone in a ring for that bottle !

It would be pre 1950.

Vince Licandro any idea of the year?

Some old bottles I have some are local beverages.

That bottle has to 80 years old now?

Charles Mirsky

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2 days ago

Lost Ottawa

Night in ... in Lost Ottawa where you could alway watch a video on your VCR fromOttawa Stereo.

Shared by Lemmy Monner, who says: "I bought this VCR at Ottawa Stereo on Bank in 1989, when they actually wrote their store name and address on the box."

Lemmy's pic made me go to my closet to see that I still have some VHS tapes ... but my VCR has gone. I don't even remember when. Still have a DVD player packed away on a high shelf. Might need it some day!
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Night in  ... in Lost Ottawa where you could alway watch a video on your VCR fromOttawa Stereo.

Shared by Lemmy Monner, who says: I bought this VCR at Ottawa Stereo on Bank in 1989, when they actually wrote their store name and address on the box.

Lemmys pic made me go to my closet to see that I still have some VHS tapes ... but my VCR has gone. I dont even remember when.  Still have a DVD player packed away on a high shelf. Might need it some day!

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My first stereo music system, a Norelco Quadraphonic unit came from Ottawa Stereo on Bank Street many, many moons ago ! πŸ˜‰

2 days ago

Lost Ottawa

Barb Collishaw shares an interesting photo of Ottawa from the Air in April of 1969.

You can compare the height of various towers on West Block and Centre Block. And there, hidden away on the right, it what would end up being the longest lasting of the famous "temporary buildings" built during the war.

The one behind the Justice Building lasted until 2012. CBC had a news story about it:

ow.ly/6L1350DdX08
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Barb Collishaw shares an interesting photo of Ottawa from the Air in April of 1969.

You can compare the height of various towers on West Block and Centre Block. And there, hidden away on the right, it what would end up being the longest lasting of the famous temporary buildings built during the war. 

The one behind the Justice Building lasted until 2012. CBC had a news story about it:

http://ow.ly/6L1350DdX08

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I worked in the temp building behind the Justice building the summer of '62 as an engineering trainee with DOT. Low ceilings, linoleum floors, and a time clock to check in and out every day.

I remember that little white building

Back in the 70's, I remember reading a newspaper article about a guy who'd lived in Ottawa during the Second World War and had moved away in 1945, returning for the first time some thirty years later. He claimed that "everything looks different - except the temporary buildings."

Here's the modern view, compliments of Google Earth. I tried to get the same view, but there are a lot of new buildings. You can see St Andrew's tower on the bottom centre with its green roof. It was built in 1988 according to Wikipedia.

Had some good times thereπŸ’•

Not an aerial view, but taken from the Skyline Hotel, which can be confirmed by lining up pairs of buildings in an aerial photo. I was working in the Justice Annex, the temporary building behind the Justice Building in the summer on 1969, the year this picture was taken.

Diane Lockhart. Yes. Think about those times a lot strangely enough. Must be the age. Keep well

Great view of the Bank of Canada before the adjoining towers were built.

I think that the RCMP Band used that building at one time. Then they had a proper band room built at Rockcliffe.

Pretty low for an airplane. Not much higher than the Peace Tower.

Our first job out of school in that building on the left! A lifetime ago but the best of times old friends.πŸ’žπŸ’žπŸ’ž

In those days, new buildings could not be taller than the Peace Tower. The Bell building on Elgin broke that taboo.

Is there a link to that cbc story?

I see my old office window down there, first floor left. Would watch people kicking a soccer ball around on the field in the spring. It was John Reynolds MP office.

Diane Lockhart and Brenda McLeod. See anything familiar

Does Barb Collishaw have the location where the photo was taken? One month earlier, March 22nd, I stayed one night at the top floor of the Skyline Hotel (Queen & Lyon). This is pretty close to the view I remember.

That little white building behind the Justice Building was where the Federal Court of Canada was housed. I got my start in the government in that shack. The nice about it was that you could open actual windows and breathe in real air while working!

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2 days ago

Lost Ottawa

Paul Couvrette shares a picture of old Ottawa -- in fact one of the oldest photos of the capital in the collection of the Bytown Museum.

Writes Paul:
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Eight of my ancestors lived in Ottawa then, and it looks so small!

With technology, maybe in a decade we will have possible family matches for those people... Match known people's names with descendants and their current pics.... Sorry, perhaps a bit too forward looking but look how far we have come since 1857.... Not just buildings but technology. Some good, some bad.

Here's an Oct. 15, 1853 Citizen ad for M.K. Dickinson and the steamer Leeds pictured:

Thanks for sharingβœŒοΈπŸ‡¨πŸ‡¦

Fascinating.

Here’s a newspaper clipping from 1852 I found... a little bit of an accompanied description of that time πŸ‘

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3 days ago

Lost Ottawa

Why the people of Ottawa didn't visit the Rideau Falls all that often. The falls were surround by industrial wasteland for the longest time.

French embassy on the left. Old factories on the right in a picture dating to 1952.

The only good way to see the Falls until the 60s was by boat ... or rowing shell.

(BAnQ 07H_P174S6D3843P01)
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Why the people of Ottawa didnt visit the Rideau Falls all that often. The falls were surround by industrial wasteland for the longest time.

French embassy on the left. Old factories on the right in a picture dating to 1952.

The only good way to see the Falls until the 60s was by boat ... or rowing shell.

(BAnQ 07H_P174S6D3843P01)

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I thought the island contained the department of statistics building.

Watched icebergs go over the falls as a kid when the city would blast the ice in the river to break it up.

I lived near the falls and would walk over to the lookout area every now and then, in wonderment at the falls alleged to have been named by Champlain. A not too complimentary write up: www.world-of-waterfalls.com/waterfalls/canada-rideau-falls/

Gerry

the ancestors built a log cabin just 100 yards from the falls, in 1831, they worked for St Louis in his mill; the kids played inside the falls, showering on the shelf there...they remained on the site till 1900...their property is now the site of the Union Basketball court...

What an odd juxtoposition. Didn't realize it was industrial there, thought the industrial area was more Lebreton Flats way.

Tavern on the Falls is now there

Daniel Armstrong

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4 days ago

Lost Ottawa

Not the greatest picture but it does show what are described as United States "machines" visiting Ottawa on January 24, 1927.

Apparently, 20,000 people waited outside for nearly two hours to see the US airmen depart after a goodwill visit. Seems the planes were frozen and the city had to get its "steam-thawing machine" to help out, hence the wait. Much hilarity ensued as teams of men tried to get the propellers while slipping on the ice.

The crowd was rewarded for its patience, however, as earliest planes to take off performed rolls and loops and thrilled the crowd by flying under the Alexandra as the remaining planes prepared for take off.

Looks darn cold, but way over on the right ... yep, a guy on a bicycle .

(LAC PA-06320)
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Not the greatest picture but it does show what are described as United States machines visiting Ottawa on January 24, 1927.

Apparently, 20,000 people waited outside for nearly two hours to see the US airmen depart after a goodwill visit. Seems the planes were frozen and the city had to get its steam-thawing machine to help out, hence the wait. Much hilarity ensued as teams of men tried to get the propellers while slipping on the ice. 

The crowd was rewarded for its patience, however, as earliest planes to take off performed rolls and loops and thrilled the crowd by flying under the Alexandra as the remaining planes prepared for take off. 

Looks darn cold, but way over on the right ... yep, a guy on a bicycle .

(LAC PA-06320)

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That is a little over 15% of the population. Canada Day does not even gets that many of Ottawans out any more! I did a quick calculation for 2019; it was 5%.

In January, 1927, at the invitation of the Canadian government, a flight of 12 Curtiss P-1 planes and a single Douglas transport from the 1st Pursuit Group at Selfridge Field, Michigan, flew to Ottawa led by Major Thomas G. Lanphier. The flight took three hours at a speed of 135 mph. The following day a crowd of 15,000 was on hand to watch the flight leave for Montreal. www.127wg.ang.af.mil/Media/Features/Display/Article/865973/selfridge-field-history-1917-1929/

Last time someone flew under that bridge a few years ago they were reported to transport canada

Amazingly, this event occurred just 18 years after the Silver Dart was Canada’s first powered flight in 1909.

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4 days ago

Lost Ottawa

Dan Faubert came across an ad for an old Ottawa store.

Says Dan:

"Trottier's 1938 New Years Specials ... bet everyone wishes prices were the same today!"
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Dan Faubert came across an ad for an old Ottawa store.

Says Dan:

Trottiers 1938 New Years Specials ... bet everyone wishes prices were the same today!

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Was this you Dan Faubert, good find if so!

The prices are relatively high if you factor inflation... that 38c pound of butter would be more than $7 today. Source: Bank of Canada www.bankofcanada.ca/rates/related/inflation-calculator/

Wow! Look at that phone number! And free delivery even before the demand of today.

Nancy Kerr look where the store was located

I wasn't aware that we ever had half-pennies

Was this the store?

I'd never heard of Chum soft drinks!

Now days just change the cents into dollars

I lived on Stirling Ave in 60's & this store was there then. It was a triangle shape building was demolished several years ago

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