Lost Ottawa Facebook 2019

Here are all the Lost Ottawa posts that appeared on Facebook in 2019, starting with the most recent and going backwards.

You can view the posts in various ways. You can read the descriptions on this page and see the initial comments. You can click on the three dots at the bottom of a post to see more comments. You can click on the picture to see a “full screen” version of the picture with comments. You can view the original post on Facebook and leave more comments there.

At the bottom of the page there is a “Get More Posts” link that will load additional posts to the page. We are still working on a way to make the posts searchable.

Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons
Monday December 30th, 2019

Carolyn Fay shares the Morning Puzzler with this picture from Metcalfe, Ontario, about 40 minutes south of Ottawa and just east of Bank Street.

Looks like a carriage maker?

Writes Carolyn:This was found at a garage sale in metcalfe Ontario. Im hoping someone can tell me anything about it.
... See MoreSee Less

Carolyn Fay shares the Morning Puzzler with this picture from Metcalfe, Ontario, about 40 minutes south of Ottawa and just east of Bank Street.

Looks like a carriage maker?

Writes Carolyn:

10 CommentsComment on Facebook

From the parts on display these may be wheelwrights - specialist suppliers to carriage-makers

Here is list of wheel manufacturers and wheelwrights in eastern Ontario in 1897 from Farmer’s and Business Directory. Given the number of workmen, I would say this is photo of the workers from the Ontario Wheel Company in Gananoque.

Can you imagine what these people would say to see all the technology we have now? They would be lost for sure 🌺🌺🌺

View more comments

Monday December 30th, 2019

Debbi Burnie shares a a fabulous photo of ten ladies visiting downtown Ottawa. Love their attire, especially the hats!

Writes Debbi:Found this photo in an old album of my grandparents Hindson’s 1918. The partial parliament buildings in Ottawa in the background
... See MoreSee Less

Debbi Burnie shares a a fabulous photo of ten ladies visiting downtown Ottawa. Love their attire, especially the hats!

Writes Debbi:

11 CommentsComment on Facebook

What a terrific picture. I wonder what the small bldg in front on the left is?

Love the hemlines too. All exactly the same — there must have been an accepted “x inches from the floor” measurement.

When the nuns introduced gymnastics in my high school, we had to get bloomers and a skirt. They actually measured the hemlines, 2 inches above the knee. So I agree, also, I am remembering yard sticks with chalk to do just that that seamstresses had.

View more comments

Sunday December 29th, 2019

Sunday Drive ... from Ottawa to Edelweiss in this mud-covered Chevy for a nice day on the slopes in 1968.

Or you could take the Tommy & Lefebvre bus from downtown, which is unloading its passenger in the background.

(LAC e99906731)
... See MoreSee Less

Sunday Drive ... from Ottawa to Edelweiss in this mud-covered Chevy for a nice day on the slopes in 1968.

Or you could take the Tommy & Lefebvre bus from downtown, which is unloading its passenger in the background. 

(LAC  e99906731)

38 CommentsComment on Facebook

My sister provided me with this picture - she said it was from 1964 and was taken at Edelweiss.

Used to take that bus every Saturday morning - $5, included your ski pass!

That had to be the worst road to drive for spring skiing. Drove my mother's new Austin 1100 one time and then stopped at the Bank & Carling self car wash to remove the evidence, but my father showed me the mud in the door openings the next morning.

View more comments

Sunday December 29th, 2019

Sunday Drivers ... featuring an assemblage of some of Ottawa's earliest automobiles, thought to be on the lawn outside City Hall, when it was located at Elgin and Queen (now the NAC).

The occasion is described as a meeting of the Ottawa Old Boys celebrating Ottawa's Golden Jubilee in 1904. On the photo it says, "City's first automobile parade."

Only the car at front left looks like an actual car. The others are more like contraptions than cars! But still, there are quite a few of them for such an early date.

(Bytown Museum P471)
... See MoreSee Less

Sunday Drivers ... featuring an assemblage of some of Ottawas earliest automobiles, thought to be on the lawn outside City Hall, when it was located at Elgin and Queen (now the NAC).

The occasion is described as a meeting of the Ottawa Old Boys celebrating Ottawas Golden Jubilee in 1904. On the photo it says, Citys first automobile parade. 

Only the car at front left looks like an actual car. The others are more like contraptions than cars! But still, there are quite a few of them for such an early date.

(Bytown Museum P471)

19 CommentsComment on Facebook

Ottawa did not celebrate a "Golden Jubilee" in 1904. As indicated in Geof Wyght's clips, this 1904 event was a weekend excursion back to Ottawa by the Ottawa Old Boys association of Toronto. This much smaller event should not be confused with the Golden Jubilee (of Ottawa as the Capital) celebrations of 1907. It was billed as a "Golden Jubilee" and as a"Summer Carnival and Old Boys' Reunion and Celebration of the Capital's Semi-Centenary."

I recently purchased a 1906 map of the Ottawa area at Pathfinders in Carleton Plane. 22"x28" in color. What a difference with very few roads and lots of railways.

I see lots of pictures of Sunday drives in Lost Ottawa...does anyone go for a Sunday drive anymore? Certainly the novelty of driving and seeing the sights must have worn off. And I’m guessing meandering slowly down a country road is likely frowned on....and maybe we don’t want to use the gas....commets? Ideas?

View more comments

Saturday December 28th, 2019

Earlier today we had a picture of Ottawa's wood market on William street in the Byward circa 1920.

Here's three pictures of how the wood got to the market -- dragged by horse and wagon across the frozen Ottawa River from Pointe Gatineau.

The third picture shows a load going up a hill, and at first I though this was beside the canal. The more I think if it the more I suspect its actually above the old Queen's Wharf on the other side of Nepean Point, below the Mint.

(LAC PA-085979, 6003, and 2007)
... See MoreSee Less

Earlier today we had a picture of Ottawas wood market on William street in the Byward circa 1920.

Heres three pictures of how the wood got to the market -- dragged by horse and wagon across the frozen Ottawa River from Pointe Gatineau.

The third picture shows a load going up a hill, and at first I though this was beside the canal. The more I think if it the more I suspect its actually above the old Queens Wharf on the other side of Nepean Point, below the Mint.

(LAC PA-085979, 6003, and 2007)Image attachmentImage attachment

9 CommentsComment on Facebook

Every time I see pictures of these times, I can't get over just how hard these gentleman (and horses) toiled.

My great grandparents lived around Chelsea in the late 1800s. He was a logger along the Gatineau. She was buried in Chelsea, but he "probably" died during the winter. We were told that those who died during the winter were "buried" where they died, on whichever side of the river was closest!

You got that right! Just Let’s not forget how hard their wives worked as well!

View more comments

Saturday December 28th, 2019

Roy Tubman shares some Ottawa swag!

It's from the RPT TV and appliance store on Sparks Street.

Writes Roy:Remember when you needed to read the temperature from a thermometer that was early "swag" for a Ottawa business.
... See MoreSee Less

Roy Tubman shares some Ottawa swag! 

Its from the RPT TV and appliance store on Sparks Street.

Writes Roy:

9 CommentsComment on Facebook

I have (in the past) serviced many console radios with the RPT stamp on them...

My godfather Roger Barette was their piano tuner for like 30 years ..he would service the clients and all by bus and he had a doctors bag ...was so cool ...he often brought me with him ... this was in 60's mostly

Our house had one of those for years!

View more comments

Saturday December 28th, 2019

Saturday Shopping in Lost Ottawa ... where you might head downtown to the "wood market" to pick up some fuel to keep you and your family warm in 1922.

As near as I can tell, the wood merchants seem to have traditionally congregated on William Street and you are looking south on William towards the corner of William and York.

The building on the far corner (to the right) is now the Fish Market restaurant, the building to the left of that has been many things over the years including Stony Monday's and Fat Tuesday's. Now it's a Starbucks.

(LAC PA-085978)
... See MoreSee Less

Saturday Shopping in Lost Ottawa ... where you might head downtown to the wood market to pick up some fuel to keep you and your family warm in 1922.

As near as I can tell, the wood merchants seem to have traditionally congregated on William Street and you are looking south on William towards the corner of William and York.

The building on the far corner (to the right) is now the Fish Market restaurant, the building to the left of that has been many things over the years including Stony Mondays and Fat Tuesdays. Now its a Starbucks.

(LAC PA-085978)

8 CommentsComment on Facebook

my husbands grandfather was one of the first coals dealer who then sold heating fuel in ottawa.

I think the building to the left is Randy River which has been there for ever and a day

Spent many many Tuesday nights at Stoney's for $1 beers. Ah, the days you could get tanked for $30

View more comments

Friday December 27th, 2019

Friday Night in Lost Ottawa, with cabbies waiting for winter business on Wellington Street in 1914.

Looks like the customers could stay warm inside the cabs, but the drivers still had to sit outside the freezing cold. Imagine one of these pulling up after you ordered your cab on Uber!

Chateau Laurier and the "Daly Building" in the background when it was still the A.E. Rea Department Store.
(LAC PA-060985)
... See MoreSee Less

Friday Night in Lost Ottawa, with cabbies waiting for winter business on Wellington Street in 1914. 

Looks like the customers could stay warm inside the cabs, but the drivers still had to sit outside the freezing cold. Imagine one of these pulling up after you ordered your cab on Uber! 

Chateau Laurier and the Daly Building in the background when it was still the A.E. Rea Department Store.
(LAC PA-060985)

23 CommentsComment on Facebook

In 1893 the Women's Humane Society arranged for three cabmen's shelters. The one at George St. at Sussex appears in several photos. A while ago, Bytown Museum shared this photo of the one on Wellington:

The hotel was pretty new at this point, about 2 years. By the end of the decade there were probably more motorized cabs than horse drawn.

Winter backup in case the LRT goes down again.

View more comments

Friday December 27th, 2019

Nice "Winter in Ottawa" pic here, taken near the end of Fifth Avenue in the Glebe, and looking north up the Rideau Canal.

To my eyes it looks the person there in the middle of the canal is pushing a bicycle. One of the first to pioneer bicycling in snow?

In the background you can make out the wooden bridge they used to build across the canal in Winter through the '50s and into the '60s
... See MoreSee Less

Nice Winter in Ottawa pic here, taken near the end of Fifth Avenue in the Glebe, and looking north up the Rideau Canal.

To my eyes it looks the person there in the middle of the canal is pushing a bicycle. One of the first to pioneer bicycling in snow?

In the background you can make out the wooden bridge they used to build across the canal in Winter through the 50s and into the 60s

20 CommentsComment on Facebook

I saw this on my way to work and had to go back at lunch to stop and get a photo, Russell road near Ramsayville Rd

A timeless winter scene in Ottawa....

That may be one of my cycling friends... Some are hard core and cycle 12 months of the year..

View more comments

Friday December 27th, 2019

Marie Clausén shares a Christmas Puzzler about this collection of Xmas carols from the Ottawa Citizen.

Writes Marie:

"I have this old carolling booklet published by the Ottawa Citizen and would love to know when it is from. Can anyone give theyear?"
... See MoreSee Less

Marie Clausén shares a Christmas Puzzler about this collection of Xmas carols from the Ottawa Citizen.

Writes Marie: 

I have this old carolling booklet published by the Ottawa Citizen and would love to know when it is from. Can anyone give theyear?

39 CommentsComment on Facebook

Due to a typo, I ran a search for "Songs of hristmas" in Citizen archives, and got only one hit, LOL. 🙂 (A Frisby Tire ad Nov. 14, 1962.)

We had a stack of these for extended-family Christmas gatherings. (photo: Christmas 2000)

Both the citizen and the journal, would issue those to all the schools as well. We would use them in class to sing Christmas carols.

View more comments

Thursday December 26th, 2019

Stephane Vermette shares an awesome Christmas find! I wonder if it gets better over the years like wine?

Notes Stephane:In my 80-year old mother’s basement. This has some age.
... See MoreSee Less

Stephane Vermette shares an awesome Christmas find! I wonder if it gets better over the years like wine?

Notes Stephane:

68 CommentsComment on Facebook

When we moved to Ottawa in 1968, there was a Steinberg in a small strip mall where Bayshore Shopping Centre now stands. When Bayshore was built in 1973, the Steinberg continued on in the mall for a few years (at checkout, they would load your groceries into plastic bins, put them on a conveyor belt, and give you a ticket. You brought your car to their exterior sidedoors around the back of the mall where the lower level of the Winners is now, presented your ticket, and they loaded your bags into your car. Service!!). These bottles would have to be late ‘70s, I would think.

Don’t forget Steinbergs, Miracle Mart and Pascals on Merivale Road

Steinbergs and Miracle Mart were across the street from Carlingwood Mall at one time.

View more comments

Thursday December 26th, 2019

Deannie Lunyk shares a picture of a Princess Elizabeth at an Ottawa square dancing party in 1951, when she was on a cross-country tour filling in for her ailing father. ... See MoreSee Less

Deannie Lunyk shares a picture of a Princess Elizabeth at an Ottawa square dancing party in 1951, when she was on a cross-country tour filling in for her ailing father.

17 CommentsComment on Facebook

"Older" folks remember the Queen as a young and beautiful woman. Now, she is old and beautiful.

Going to dances back in those days was considered quite sociable. Life was so much simpler then. No one had much (money, social status, etc) but they sure knew how to have fun.

Look at her expression. She rarely had this face a few years later...

View more comments

Thursday December 26th, 2019

De Gooyer Steven shares a post about the "proving grounds" out in what is now Ottawa's east end.

Explains Steven:
... See MoreSee Less

37 CommentsComment on Facebook

Our father Lt.Col. B.D. (Doug) Irvin was the original CO of this facility.

My Dad worked there from 1959 to 1966. I vaguely remember getting tours including some tanks, but my favourite (since I was not yet old enough for school) was the fire engine - fire department right on site - I got to turn on the siren a couple of times 🙂 .

I can add to how poor a decision to close LETE was. There was international testing of army vehicles and equipment done there. There was equipment tested that despite the political push to accept the contract there was push back thus ruining several careers. Could this possibly be why the later trucks were accepted? I suspect as much. Better a career problem than equipment problems. Closing the establishment was detrimental to furthering Canada’s standing internationally. Ottawa is a prime location for testing weather effects on equipment as we have the driest-coldest, driest-hottest, humid-coldest and humid-hottest weather internationally. Deeply disappointed in our governments for not returning to our own testing.

View more comments

Wednesday December 25th, 2019

For those of you who missed our greetings this morning, here's a Season's Greetings just for you, featuring a Tuck "Oilette" postcard from around 1905.

This one has several of Ottawa "most lost" items in it -- the Russell House on the left and the Old Post Office in the middle, plus the ramshackle tin-roofed stairway down to Union Station before it was Union Station.

Last but not least ... my favourite thing about Ottawa in those times, namely the huge empty triangle in front of the Old Post Office, with the Sappers and Dufferin Bridges on either side.

Hope you are stuffed with turkey right now, like I am!
... See MoreSee Less

For those of you who missed our greetings this morning, heres a Seasons Greetings just for you, featuring a Tuck Oilette postcard from around 1905.

This one has several of Ottawa most lost items in it -- the Russell House on the left and the Old Post Office in the middle, plus the ramshackle tin-roofed stairway down to Union Station before it was Union Station.

Last but not least ... my favourite thing about Ottawa in those times, namely the huge empty triangle in front of the Old Post Office, with the Sappers and Dufferin Bridges on either side.

Hope you are stuffed with turkey right now, like I am!

7 CommentsComment on Facebook

Ottawa looks quaint and perfect in this post card

How did you conclude the stairway was ramshackle?

The vault being cleaned and taking out or was being taking out from within the building that's why there s construction in the old post office been a while now

View more comments

Wednesday December 25th, 2019

It's a little small, but it's still a picture of Santa in Ottawa. He's on his way to Freiman's Toyland in November 10, 1955.

Santa had just arrived at Union Station on the Santa Mystery Special from Vars, where he had flown in by helicopter. Thousands of kids got to take the train with Santa over the years.

Looks like the reindeer are taking him into the now lost Mosgrove Street.

(City of Ottawa Archives CA041795)
... See MoreSee Less

Its a little small, but its still a picture of Santa in Ottawa. Hes on his way to Freimans Toyland in November 10, 1955.

Santa had just arrived at Union Station on the Santa Mystery Special from Vars, where he had flown in by helicopter. Thousands of kids got to take the train with Santa over the years.

Looks like the reindeer are taking him into the now lost Mosgrove Street.

(City of Ottawa Archives CA041795)

36 CommentsComment on Facebook

My dad was the conductor on the Santa train many times

I would have been there to watch the parade with my mom then go to Freeman’s for a malted milk 🎄🎄🎄

My aunt took my brother and I on the train from Vars to Union Station. We were probably at that parade. Santa’s helpers handed out hot chocolat and candy canes to us.

View more comments

Wednesday December 25th, 2019

Christmas Greetings from Lost Ottawa!

And what better way to celebrate the day than a nice Tuck Oilette postcard, featuring the Lost Parliament Buildings sometime around 1905.

If only it was warm enough for nice drive around Parliament Hill in an open car!
... See MoreSee Less

Christmas Greetings from Lost Ottawa!

And what better way to celebrate the day than a nice Tuck Oilette postcard, featuring the Lost Parliament Buildings sometime around 1905.

If only it was warm enough for nice drive around Parliament Hill in an open car!

20 CommentsComment on Facebook

Merry Christmas to the gang at Lost Ottawa!

Wishing all here a Merry Christmas, cheers.

Thank you so, so much. I so appreciate the work that you do and for the many photos and articles that you post almost daily. Very Merry Christmas

View more comments

Tuesday December 24th, 2019

If you're desperate for something new to watch on an Ottawa Xmas Eve, here's Santa, some sidewinders, and the Old West.

NFB animated short from Archive.org.

The Great Toy Robbery : National Film Board of Canada : Free Download, Borrow, and Streaming : Internet Archive
Producer, Wolf Koening, Bob Verrall ; Director, Jeff Hale ; Story, Derek Lamb ; Animation, Jeff Hale, Cameron Guese ; Music, Don Douglas
... See MoreSee Less

0 CommentsComment on Facebook

Tuesday December 24th, 2019

Santa delivers the gift of Canada, right here in Ottawa.

Goofy picture, I know, but it's just to say Merry Xmas and Best Wishes for the Season while we slack off over Christmas!
... See MoreSee Less

Santa delivers the gift of Canada, right here in Ottawa.

Goofy picture, I know, but its just to say Merry Xmas and Best Wishes for the Season while we slack off over Christmas!

16 CommentsComment on Facebook

Merry Christmas! Thanks for finding what we lost to the march of time. You do great work.

I love this so retro and Merry Christmas!

Merry Christmas and thanks for all that you do 😊

View more comments

Tuesday December 24th, 2019

We're borrowing a great item from our friends at the Bytown Museum -- the Santa Streetcar put on by the Ottawa Electric Railway in 1896.

Check out the size of the crowd, looking west down Sparks Street from the balcony of the of Russell House hotel.

Who knew Santa could drive a streetcar as well as a sleigh!
... See MoreSee Less

Were borrowing a great item from our friends at the Bytown Museum -- the Santa Streetcar put on by the Ottawa Electric Railway in 1896.

Check out the size of the crowd, looking west down Sparks Street from the balcony of the of Russell House hotel.

Who knew Santa could drive a streetcar as well as a sleigh!

27 CommentsComment on Facebook

I updated it Lost Ottawa....Merrrrry Christmas.

This souvenir was shared last year by Bytown Museum:

It is a little known fact that this "project" was paid for personally by Mr. Soper of the OER. It included daily press reports of Santa's progress from the time he arrived (in Maniwaki, if I remember correctly, and down the valley of the Gatineau River to Ottawa. He also footed the bill for 4,000 oranges to be shipped from Florida (I believe) for Santa to distribute. Fresh oranges were a rare delicacy in Ottawa, in winter, and usually only available to families who had money. I remember my grandmother (born 1875) telling me that , she remembered receiving an orange, only at Christmas, if she had been a good girl all year. So the oranges were a huge deal for the kids back then.

View more comments

Tuesday December 24th, 2019

Doesn't look like we'll have a White Christmas in Ottawa this year, but we can still have a Snow Puzzler!

And the question is ... apart from the issue of our poor forebearers who had this much snow in May of 1907 ... would anyone care to hazard a guess as to where this is?

I'm guessing Rockcliffe Park or the Arboretum.

Question shared by Phil Culhane.
... See MoreSee Less

Doesnt look like well have a White Christmas in Ottawa this year, but we can still have a Snow Puzzler!

And the question is ... apart from the issue of our poor forebearers who had this much snow in May of 1907 ... would anyone care to hazard a guess as to where this is?

Im guessing Rockcliffe Park or the Arboretum. 

Question shared by Phil Culhane.

20 CommentsComment on Facebook

Technically we will have a White Christmas. I remember in 1979, it poured buckets (with overnight thundershowers) on Christmas Eve and on Christmas Day. But about the day after Boxing Day, it snowed big time and we more than enough snow to welcome in that grand decade of the 1980s, lol.

It reminds me of the path from the Dow's Lake pavilion to Carleton in the atrium. Kids have a toboggan run just near there.

It's a beautiful picture but nothing specifically Christmassy about it.

View more comments

Monday December 23rd, 2019

We'll get it back one day, but meanwhile André Dupuis shares a report about will be one of the longest construction jobs in recent Ottawa history -- the renovation of Parliament Hill.

Writes Andre:
... See MoreSee Less

3 CommentsComment on Facebook

Lived in Ottawa my whole life and never been in the peace tower. I should have gone before construction started because Now I won’t have an opportunity for at least another 15 years or so.

On top of the interior updates mentioned by Rod Lister, all of the Parliament Buildings will be going under seismic updates (earthquake proof), building code updates for accessibility, security improvements, and removal of dangerous materials such as asbestos, lead, to name a few. And most importantly, after renovations are completed, there will be accessibility improvements for pedestrian, as well as, safer vehicular circulation around the hill. I also noticed there will be better landscaping and lighting. I have seen the Long Term Vision Plan for Hill, and it is quite impressive. Can’t wait to see it come to fruitation in the end.

Let's all hope that the same luminaries who designed the proposed addition to the Chateau Laurier are light years removed from this project.

Monday December 23rd, 2019

Jaan Kolk is hoping for an extra-special Ottawa Christmas present!

Writes Jaan:
... See MoreSee Less

Jaan Kolk is hoping for an extra-special Ottawa Christmas present!

Writes Jaan:Image attachmentImage attachment

5 CommentsComment on Facebook

Her Worship Mayor Charlotte Whitton probably receiving the first copy from Jack Snow.

I remember Mayor Whitton. To think we had a woman mayor back then, quite progressive for the 60's!

Jaan Kolk, if I had one I'd gladly give it to you. Thank you for all the research, time and effort you do as a member of this group! Best wishes to you! 👏

View more comments

Monday December 23rd, 2019

Shovelling snow in Ottawa takes years of practice, and you have to start young!

Shared by Christine Deriger Stinson, who writes:
... See MoreSee Less

5 CommentsComment on Facebook

We lived in the Glebe and I also remember shoveling and playing in the snow. Great times!

We lived in Lindenlea and I went to Crichton in the fifties. Had lots of friends in the Burg. Now it has been completely "gentrified". Great memories!

Right after WW2 and into the early 50’s there were still many old cars still around from the 20’s and 30’s. I remember when my dad got a new 1953 Plymouth it was big times!

View more comments

Sunday December 22nd, 2019

Camp Fortune has been a favorite of Ottawa skiers for decades, but once it was a haven for ski-jumpers as well, who made great use of the Lockeburg Jump.

The jump was named after Sigurd Lockeberg, who moved to Ottawa from Norway in 1905, and built Ottawa's first ski-jump in Rockcliffe Park in 1909-10.

I found some clips of brave souls (possibly all the same guy) going off the jump in 1964.

I guess skiiing has its fashion, too, and ski-jumping is no longer popular in the capital region. Of course, that could be because all the ski jumps have disppaeared ...

(NFB Shot 23538)
... See MoreSee Less

25 CommentsComment on Facebook

Many a torn and stained jacket from that rope tow. I think we went up the hill faster than coming down.

I learned to ski at Camp Fortune in the late 50’s!

I remember the ski jump! We'd always go and watch if someone was training. I spent the majority of my youth skiing those hills every weekend without fail!

View more comments

Sunday December 22nd, 2019

Parkin' on Parliament! I don't know why this is one of my favourite Lost Ottawa subjects, but here we are in what appears to be the late 1940s, earl '50s. ... See MoreSee Less

Parkin on Parliament! I dont know why this is one of my favourite Lost Ottawa subjects, but here we are in what appears to be the late 1940s, earl 50s.

13 CommentsComment on Facebook

I remember going to look at the Christmas lights on Parliament Hill with my Dad every year. Miss those days but miss him more. ❤❤

It was a great place to park in the summer, and do your down town shopping, or just stroll the hill and take in all the sights ! 😉

Was able to park and drive up and around until 9/11

View more comments

Sunday December 22nd, 2019

Sunday Drive just outside Ottawa circa 1900, shared by Donald Legault. Dress up warm!

Writes Don:One hundred or so years ago this is how we would have travelled to visit relatives during the holidays. This photo was taken in front of Philibert Dubé's house in Lemieux, approximately 10 miles from Casselman. All that remains of Lemieux is the cemetery since the town has been abandoned due to the instability of the soil. The youngster near the front of the horse is Réal Denis. He his a grandson of Philibert and was born in 1914 dating this photo to the early 1920s.
... See MoreSee Less

Sunday Drive just outside Ottawa circa 1900, shared by Donald Legault. Dress up warm!

Writes Don:

13 CommentsComment on Facebook

Thanks for sharing. Love those pics that are explained as much as possible

Also bricks warmed in the oven and wrapped in newspapers were a good way to keep warm under the blankets or buffalo robe

Making sure the blanket is well placed so the women will stay warm.

View more comments

Saturday December 21st, 2019

Here's a short video for the holiday season from Lost Ottawa. It's a steam train full of skiers arriving in Wakefield from Ottawa in 1949.

Now that would have been a nice way to spend a Winter day!
... See MoreSee Less

36 CommentsComment on Facebook

Took our Dad, on it Two years before, it retired. Best days of my life, he enjoyed, it, brought back a lot of memories for him. The lunch in Wakefield, was amazing. Superb Day, for us Girls🎄😘❤️

Merry Christmas to the Lost Ottawa! The more pictures I see, the more I get to feel love for our little city. The pics shows why we still have that small town feel.

We went on the train and it was a beautiful trip. So sad it's gone.

View more comments

Saturday December 21st, 2019

Your music for Christmas Week in 1968 as recorded in CFRA's Ottawa's Top 40. "Love Child" by Diana Ross and the Supremes at Number 1, which seems to have been trading places with "Abraham, Martin and John" that month.

Several other classics in there, but after all these years I'm thinking Joe Cocker "With a Little Help From My Friends" might be the one I'd put on the record player right now, or else "Magic Carpet Ride!"

I notice they put the correct date on the cover of the Swing Set, but left the previous week's date on the the list itself. Still, Season's Greetings!

(Shared by Ken Clavette)
... See MoreSee Less

Your music for Christmas Week in 1968 as recorded in CFRAs Ottawas Top 40. Love Child by Diana Ross and the Supremes at Number 1, which seems to have been trading places with Abraham, Martin and John that month. 

Several other classics in there, but after all these years Im thinking Joe Cocker With a Little Help From My Friends might be the one Id put on the record player right now, or else Magic Carpet Ride!

I notice they put the correct date on the cover of the Swing Set, but left the previous weeks date on the the list itself. Still, Seasons Greetings!

(Shared by Ken Clavette)Image attachment

15 CommentsComment on Facebook

Makes me laugh that Joe Cocker and Engelbert Humperdink are on the same list at the same time!

Son of a Preacher Man, one of m6 favourites!

Knew, and still remember nearly every song on that chart...unlike any similar chart compiled today. 🙂

View more comments

Saturday December 21st, 2019

Stopping in at the Imperial Esso Station, identified as being at Baseline and Woodrooffe in 1964. Looking at GeoOttawa, it seems it was across from Shoppers City rather than right on the corner.

I'm thinking that is a 1961 Oldsmobile on the left, with it's weird "under fins." But the convertible on the right has me beat! A '59 Hillman Minx, perhaps?

I'll take one of those under the Christmas Tree, please!

(Glenbow IP-12-27c-34)
... See MoreSee Less

Stopping in at the Imperial Esso Station, identified as being at Baseline and Woodrooffe in 1964. Looking at GeoOttawa, it seems it was across from Shoppers City rather than right on the corner. 

Im thinking that is a 1961 Oldsmobile on the left, with its weird under fins. But the convertible on the right has me beat! A 59 Hillman Minx, perhaps?

Ill take one of those under the Christmas Tree, please!

(Glenbow IP-12-27c-34)

34 CommentsComment on Facebook

It was Bill Shaws Esso on the corner which is now an eye place, then beside that was the City Restaurant,then A Sunoco beside that which was owned by Tony Graham,then Kentucky Fried. Tony Graham Expanded and went KFC to Shaws (talking west to east) Summerhays is now in that spot. Rumour had it that the city restaurant back in history use to be small hotel offering “services”

I used to get $0.50 worth of gas here for my Mini!

The colour photo is the Esso at Baseline and Clyde. Here is B&W photo from Glenbow Archives of the Esso at Baseline and Clyde. Note similarities: bay configuration, chimney and hydro pole in background.

View more comments

Saturday December 21st, 2019

Postcards from not quite Ottawa, shared by Steven Keenan. Maniwaki and La Verendrye Park.

Notes Steven:Not quite Ottawa postcards, a couple of places a little over an hour north.
... See MoreSee Less

Postcards from not quite Ottawa, shared by Steven Keenan. Maniwaki and La Verendrye Park.

Notes Steven:
Friday December 20th, 2019

Trevor Button shares just the thing for a Friday Night in Lost Ottawa -- a picture of winter drag racing.

It looks like they even had their own "Christmas Tree," meaning those lights on the right that that flashed from yellow to green and even to red, if one driver jumped off too quick.

Writes Trevor:

"Here's a picture I just found among my thousands of old kodachromes, entitled "Carleton Hill Drag 1968." Not sure of any details beyond that. Assume Carleton University?"
... See MoreSee Less

Trevor Button shares just the thing for a Friday Night in Lost Ottawa -- a picture of winter drag racing. 

It looks like they even had their own Christmas Tree, meaning those lights on the right that that flashed from yellow to green and even to red, if one driver jumped off too quick.

Writes Trevor: 

Heres a picture I just found among my thousands of old kodachromes, entitled Carleton Hill Drag 1968. Not sure of any details beyond that. Assume Carleton University?

11 CommentsComment on Facebook

Definitely a "Christmas Tree," with the lights facing towards the driver. These replaced the flagman, so I don't know why one is present. The flagman's position and the tire marks suggest that only one lane was used, rather than the traditional two-lane dragstrip (like the legal Luskville or the illegal Carling Avenue). Also definitely Carleton red-black-&-white leather jackets.I attended Carleton 1974-75, so this is before my time. Wish I had seen this!

Could “Carleton hill” be The flat land between colonel by and the campus entrance? I don’t recall paved roads there though. That looks more Bronson. But that space was used for hot air balloons in the dimmer

Yes, this was at Carleton University and if I recall this was a race against time from point A (the starting line) to B (finish). The quickest car in each class was clammed the winner. They held these races about three times .

View more comments

Friday December 20th, 2019

The Conservatory in Major's Hill Park, circa 1905, which supplied Ottawa's first park (est. 1875) with its own flowers.

I'm not one hundred percent certain, but it looks like the front "gazebo" part of this building was modified into what is now Header House (also Tavern on the Hill), when the greenhouse complex was dismantled in 1937-38.

To the left is the old Government Printing Bureau, located more or less where the National Gallery is now. Appropriate, because this picture by Emile Lacas is in the collection of the National Gallery (31386.40).
... See MoreSee Less

The Conservatory in Majors Hill Park, circa 1905, which supplied Ottawas first park (est. 1875) with its own flowers.

Im not one hundred percent certain, but it looks like the front gazebo part of this building was modified into what is now Header House (also Tavern on the Hill), when the greenhouse complex was dismantled in 1937-38.

To the left is the old Government Printing Bureau, located more or less where the National Gallery is now. Appropriate, because this picture by Emile Lacas is in the collection of the National Gallery (31386.40).

4 CommentsComment on Facebook

I do believe that the conservatory greenhouse on Maple Avenue on the Central Experimental Farm, was part of the Major's Hill complex.

That's a great photo.

Never knew if this building, very neat but wonder when it was taken down,,,,regretfully.

Friday December 20th, 2019

Your Original Morning Commute from Hull to Ottawa, shared by Dom Gvr.

Shared by Dom Gvr, who explains:

"Found an image of this plate yesterday. Of particular interest to me is what I believe to be the first bridge spanning the main channel of the Ottawa River at Chaudiere Falls, predating the wood truss bridge completed in 1828.

Described as "a hempen bridge consisting of four three-inch hawsers, was swung across the river, forming an inverted segment, the lowest point of which stood about seven feet above the dark and swift stream, whilst its extremities were elevated upwards of 32 feet, abutting upon the perpendicular limestone walls of the channel. It admitted the passage of pedestrians, although the attempt, with the unpracticed especially, was not made without some consciousness of danger"
... See MoreSee Less

Your Original Morning Commute from Hull to Ottawa, shared by Dom Gvr.

Shared by Dom Gvr, who explains: 

Found an image of this plate yesterday. Of particular interest to me is what I believe to be the first bridge spanning the main channel of the Ottawa River at Chaudiere Falls, predating the wood truss bridge completed in 1828.

Described as a hempen bridge consisting of four three-inch hawsers, was swung across the river, forming an inverted segment, the lowest point of which stood about seven feet above the dark and swift stream, whilst its extremities were elevated upwards of 32 feet, abutting upon the perpendicular limestone walls of the channel. It admitted the passage of pedestrians, although the attempt, with the unpracticed especially, was not made without some consciousness of danger

12 CommentsComment on Facebook

Here is hand-drawn map from 1827 to go with the wonderful engraving of the Chaudiere Falls. Alexander Sherriff, "Rough draft of the Ground between Dows Swamp on the Rideau Canal & the Chaudiere Lake", 1827, Library and Archives Canada, F/440/Ottawa/1827, NMC 79951.

If they had just moved the camera to the right a bit they would have had a better photo of the falls...

Here is an enlargement of the section showing the bridge.

View more comments

Thursday December 19th, 2019

Here's something a little unusual for you history buffs -- it's a podcast called Finished Girls, which is a sort of comedy/history show about Ottawa and its red light district in the 1880s.

Here's part of the promo from Comedy Network writer Rick Kaulbars:

"It’s the 1880s in Canada’s capital, and one of the busiest brothels in Ottawa’s red light district is hastily preparing for the return of their core clientele… lumbermen. But change is in the air and as the newly installed federal government begins to influence daily life in the city, the women of “Cluster’s Finishing School” have told their manipulative pimp that they’re done with the game. This is the story of their final season and a city in transition."

It's really more of radio play, with eight episodes you can listen to online at:

www.finishedgirls.ca/episodes/

Want a teaser? Check out this link:

www.facebook.com/watch/?v=358852928386410
... See MoreSee Less

Heres something a little unusual for you history buffs -- its a podcast called Finished Girls, which is a sort of comedy/history show about Ottawa and its red light district in the 1880s. 

Heres part of the promo from Comedy Network writer Rick Kaulbars:

It’s the 1880s in Canada’s capital, and one of the busiest brothels in Ottawa’s red light district is hastily preparing for the return of their core clientele… lumbermen. But change is in the air and as the newly installed federal government begins to influence daily life in the city, the women of “Cluster’s Finishing School” have told their manipulative pimp that they’re done with the game. This is the story of their final season and a city in transition.

Its really more of radio play, with eight episodes you can listen to online at:

http://www.finishedgirls.ca/episodes/

Want a teaser? Check out this link:

https://www.facebook.com/watch/?v=358852928386410

6 CommentsComment on Facebook

Ottawa's brothels are always extra busy when Parliament is in session.

So cool! Thanks for sharing.

Hey Richard, you’re Lost Ottawa famous!

View more comments

Thursday December 19th, 2019

Alan Kay shares a photo of what looks like it could be a Christmas Party.

Check out the trousers of the guy on the left. Please tell me those are not hip again!

Says Alan:
... See MoreSee Less

Alan Kay shares a photo of what looks like it could be a Christmas Party.

Check out the trousers of the guy on the left. Please tell me those are not hip again!

Says Alan:

15 CommentsComment on Facebook

Yes that was room 253-D in Centre Block. Also known as the railway committee room 🙂

It's also been pointed out that the guy on the left is a dead ringer for Bubbles

The painting "The ghost of Vimy Ridge" in the background was recently moved from Centre Block to the lobby of the Wellington Building.

View more comments

Thursday December 19th, 2019

Some of you will be baking up a storm this week in preparation for Christmas -- and you might be using age-old recipes from this cookbook, popular in Ottawa and elsewhere.

Shared by Lee Anne Graston, who writes:

"I bought this cookbook recently at a work book sale. It's the 1956 version. For the short time I had it on my desk before bringing it home, I got several comments from co-workers who remembered their mothers having this cookbook.

I am hoping to try some of the recipes, although some will no longer appeal to our tastes. I particularly like the dedication to Canadian housewives!"
... See MoreSee Less

Some of you will be baking up a storm this week in preparation for Christmas -- and you might be using age-old recipes from this cookbook, popular in  Ottawa and elsewhere.

Shared by Lee Anne Graston, who writes:

I bought this cookbook recently at a work book sale. Its the 1956 version. For the short time I had it on my desk before bringing it home, I got several comments from co-workers who remembered their mothers having this cookbook. 

I am hoping to try some of the recipes, although some will no longer appeal to our tastes. I particularly like the dedication to Canadian housewives!Image attachmentImage attachment

56 CommentsComment on Facebook

I have the Five Roses cookbook, in French! New edition dated 1982. I love it and still use it quite often (as you can see by the condition it’s in. 😊) I actually used it today to make peanut butter cookies.

I have the 24th Edition .. I got it when I got married in 1967. The Chocolate Chip cookie recipe on page 64 has been my go to recipe for as long as I can remember!

I also have the Five Roses Cookbook, the Purity Cookbook, the Company’s Coming series, etc....all tried and true recipes

View more comments

Thursday December 19th, 2019

Gilles Paquette shares a fine assemblage fruit adverts.

Reminds me of my youth working for Ottawa fruit vendors Top Banana on Merivale and then Shulman's in the Bayshore Mall, but also of Xmas and those crates of mandarins oranges my Mom would buy -- but only for the holiday season.

Writes Gilles:

"A friend and I renovated an old cottage Chelsea in the early '90s, where we found these old crate advertisement used as part of the under flooring. Maybe someone may recognize them as they were well before my time ... cheers!"
... See MoreSee Less

Gilles Paquette shares a fine assemblage fruit adverts. 

Reminds me of my youth working for Ottawa fruit vendors Top Banana on Merivale and then Shulmans in the Bayshore Mall, but also of Xmas and those crates of mandarins oranges my Mom would buy -- but only for the holiday season.

Writes Gilles:

A friend and I renovated an old cottage Chelsea in the early 90s, where we found these old crate advertisement used as part of the under flooring. Maybe someone may recognize them as they were well before my time ... cheers!

4 CommentsComment on Facebook

"Orange Crate Art" was very colorful, and was used on a wide variety of product usually sold, and transported in bulk containers. The paper labels were glued to the crates, and were easily damaged. They were a form of advertising for bulk fruits and vegetables. 🤨

I remember the Mandarins in the wooden box. They were a special Christmas treat. Hard to find now. All I see are clementines which I don’t care for.

what a great find!

Wednesday December 18th, 2019

Night Out in Lost Ottawa, Christmas Edition ... where you could be greeted by this Santa in the once famous Canadian Grill at the Chateau Laurier.

Opened along with the last major expansion of the Chateau in 1929, the Grill was often referred to as the "Third House of Parliament," because so many deals were brokered there.

The Grill closed in 1991, which makes me wonder ... where do the politicos go now?

(CSTM CN H-400, originally taken for the Canadian Food Journal)
... See MoreSee Less

Night Out in Lost Ottawa, Christmas Edition ... where you could be greeted by this Santa in the once famous Canadian Grill at the Chateau Laurier. 

Opened along with the last major expansion of the Chateau in 1929, the Grill was often referred to as the Third House of Parliament, because so many deals were brokered there. 

The Grill closed in 1991, which makes me wonder ... where do the politicos go now? 

(CSTM CN H-400, originally taken for the Canadian Food Journal)

12 CommentsComment on Facebook

That's where my wedding dinner was. Really nice.

Loved lunch at the Canadian Grill.

Didn’t they go to Hy’s steakhouse? Before they closed the doors permanently, recently....

View more comments

Get More Posts