Lost Ottawa Facebook 2018

Here are all the Lost Ottawa posts that appeared on Facebook in 2018, starting with the most recent and going backwards.

You can view the posts in various ways. You can read the descriptions on this page and see the initial comments. You can click on the three dots at the bottom of a post to see more comments. You can click on the picture to see a “full screen” version of the picture with comments. You can view the original post on Facebook and leave more comments there.

At the bottom of the page there is a “Get More Posts” link that will load additional posts to the page. We are still working on a way to make the posts searchable.

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Sunday December 30th, 2018
Lost Ottawa

Steven Keenan shares a piece of Ottawa memorabilia from 1987.

Explains Steven:Since Cobden Road was mentioned last week. Ottawa Nepean Canadian Sports Club 1987 Directory.
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Steven Keenan shares a piece of Ottawa memorabilia from 1987.

Explains Steven:

2 CommentsComment on Facebook

My Dad's name is on that list. Don Reid, Vice President. He loved that club.

A man's club obviously. Believe it still is.

Sunday December 30th, 2018
Lost Ottawa

Looking down on Ottawa's lost Lebreton Flats in this great photo shared by Fred Byers.

Writes Fred:The old neighborhood, Lebreton Flats. In 1867 Ottawa was considered one of the most dangerous cities in North America. The Flats, would be the reason for that notoriety.
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Looking down on Ottawas lost Lebreton Flats in this great photo shared by Fred Byers.

Writes Fred:

17 CommentsComment on Facebook

First I hear that we were one of the most dangerous cities then! Any idea where that bit comes from?

Ottawa was a rough lumber town on the edge of civilization back then.

It's strange to see all those buildings on that property that has been vacant for my whole life.

Might have been consider rough because of the fighting between the Irish Catholics and the French (Shiners' War) in the mid 1800s.

Don't think the 1867 date is right. Look at the cars in the photo.

My mom taught at Wellington street school in the early 60's. We're just talking about it today. It was a working poor neighbourhood. Shame they tore it down then did nothing for so long.

Now to pave over a few more parts of Ottawa

If you read your Bytown history you will find it was indeed pretty wild.

So sad that so many people were displaced from the flats....

Did they expropriate because of sub standard housing conditions ?

I see that the claim has been edited from saying "The most dangerous city" to "one of the most dangerous cities", which would be more in keeping with reality. As a result, I have deleted my questions about sources.

I went to Wellington school

How well I remember Wellington School. Spent my Kindergarten to Gade 6 there. Recall the entrance to the kindergarten room. Up the iron stairs directly into that room and my first teacher Mrs. Cunningham. That was 1936. I still have a great full page article with photos from the Ottawa Journal in my scrap book.

Still is dangerous, still catch the news, gun play, murder it's all there. The town I live in now had 1 murder in 1897 and they still havent caught the guy

I lived in the flats and attended Wellington PS, great times were had by all.

What is that large building. A school

No more parking lots please.

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Sunday December 30th, 2018
Lost Ottawa

Here's an Ottawa panorama looking northeast from Parliament Hill shared by Ben Weiss.

Writes Ben:Thursday's posted photo of the Government Printing Bureau (now site of the National Gallery) prompted me to think about this 1855 panorama of Lower Town, which shows that same spot and the surrounding area.
There's definitely no National Gallery or Government Printing Bureau. But clearly visible on "Sussex Street" is the Notre Dame Cathedral, the early Ottawa General Hospital (which wouldn't leave Sussex Drive until 1980) and the Convent.... all relatively new at the time.
This detailed picture (from the perspective of soon-to-be Parliament Hill) certainly shows the early influence on Bytown of Elisabeth Bruyere and the Grey Nuns and Bishop Guigues and the Oblate Fathers.
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Heres an Ottawa panorama looking northeast from Parliament Hill shared by Ben Weiss.

Writes Ben:

6 CommentsComment on Facebook

This is a crop from a larger 1855 Edwin Whitefield lithograph, Whitefield's Original Views of North American Cities No. 35, captioned "Ottawa City, Canada West (Lower Town)" LAC has the full image as MIKAN 2837427. It is available in high resolution from Heritage Passages www.passageshistoriques-heritagepassages.ca/ , but the site is down right now. (I hope it's only a temporary problem.)

This is so cool! Any info on who the artist is?

Omg....this is so amazing. Love these old photos. Shows us how a town grows...thanks

(Photo from Library and Archives Canada)

Remember back then no traffic !!!

Hassan Yazbeckk

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Saturday December 29th, 2018
Lost Ottawa

Snowtime is Joytime in Ottawa according to this silent film clip shared from the vaults of the Natonal Film Board.

The clip offers a joytime to historians, at least. You will get to see some great scenes of dowtown Ottawa, the ski train that used to take you to the Gatineau, and number of pictures showing you how skiiing used to be ... and not a tow in sight!

FYI, the clip is a little long -- but it's really worth it, especially the footage of ski jumping in Rockliffe at the end. Bring back the Jump!
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11 CommentsComment on Facebook

You should put in the sound of an old school film projector to accompany this !

OMG what a wonderful video. I loved skiing in these beautiful places and on my parents old skis from about the same time. Camp fortune, Eidleweis, Vorlage - so much fun.

What a great clip! (I see a number of folks in the film engaged in the less popular but more challenging "uphill" skiing.) Gatineau ski trails look much like they do nowadays.

I like the ski-ers word in the text, not skiers.

great footage thank you for sharing! !!!!

Wonderful. Takes me back to my Ottawa ski days

Love this! Reminds me of photos I have of my great uncles skiing the Laurentians.

So great, thank you.

What year is this?

This is terrific! Thanks for posting.

Rory P. McGlynn

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Saturday December 29th, 2018
Lost Ottawa

Jay Dorey shares an Ottawa mystery sign, found on a downtown rooftop. Lost *out of* plain sight?

Says Jay:Found this weird sign while working on a roof on wellington street. I bet there is something interesting behind this.
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Jay Dorey shares an Ottawa mystery sign, found on a downtown rooftop. Lost *out of* plain sight?

Says Jay:

23 CommentsComment on Facebook

Lol. I was wondering why it was bilingual.

Dam, take a picture... when she comes back looking for cash, half the house, and your pension this little sign might just be the ticket.

Who writes a note to their spouse in both official languages? Too funny.

Adieu. Not À dieu.... different meaning. They need to correct it.

Not sure there is a mystery here...Vincent is a disappointment and his wife just gave her notice #boybye

OMG Run Vincent! Run and don't look back. This is a sign of crazy.

I agree with Mr. Elgear. If it was genuine it would be in one language. So what WAS it about?

In both languages? Because she is not sure what he speaks?

I can neither confirm nor deny that this is a clue for the room called “Psycho” at Escape Manor

I would’ve remembered that....

Dear John...

Looks sad to me

Escape room for sure

Starry Starry night.....

Pretty weird...

One month? Yikes. Hope he got a pre-nup

That takes courage. Bravo.

Billy Rogers - can you confirm?

Miranda Jones

Dawn Faithfull

It’s a clue for the escape room across the alley.

Why bilingual? Lol

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Saturday December 29th, 2018
Lost Ottawa

Came across this small but amazingly-coloured lantern slide of Ottawa from the McCord Museum yesterday.

Taken from the Sappers Bridge sometime around 1896, it shows the canal when it was still a working proposition.

There were still freight forwarders and such on the right side of the Rideau Canal. On the left? Those noisy contraptions that ultimately ruined the canal's financial prospects.

The cars you see there were for J.R Booth's Canada Atlantic Railway and those were the trains sheds passengers used before there was a Union Station.

I also love the view of the earlier Laurier Avenue Bridge in the distance. Imagine driving over that!

(McCord Museum 025-860)
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Came across this small but amazingly-coloured lantern slide of Ottawa from the McCord Museum yesterday. 

Taken from the Sappers Bridge sometime around 1896, it shows the canal when it was still a working proposition.

There were still freight forwarders and such on the right side of the Rideau Canal. On the left? Those noisy contraptions that ultimately ruined the canals financial prospects.

The cars you see there were for J.R Booths Canada Atlantic Railway and those were the trains sheds passengers used before there was a Union Station. 

I also love the view of the earlier Laurier Avenue Bridge in the distance. Imagine driving over that!

(McCord Museum 025-860)

34 CommentsComment on Facebook

It is great to be able to see how it used to be. It seems so quiet and picturesque. We even see the "turning pond" just past the boat. It would be roughly where Confederation Park is now. Makes you want to go for a stroll allong it... wait a second. No easy public access! And in reality, imagine the bustling sounds of the industrial era. After all, this was a working warterway, with the steam locomotives on one side, and the busy warehouses on the other side. I like what Ottawa has done to the area: kept the majestic views, opened it up to locals and tourists from all over the world, allowing us to share it, yet preserve it. Something to be proud of, both past and present!

Sensational photo in every possible way. It feels so special because this is truly my backyard in a time I never knew. Went to Lisgar and lived just across the field. And my daughter married her Prince, a proud Highlander, and the reception was in the Drill Hall!

What an incredible picture...the colour and amazingly clear resolution makes you feel like you've transported yourself back there in time....! Notice the non-stop curvature of the Laurier Bridge. This 400 ft steel bridge was built in a parabolic curve, unique in all of Canada in that it was built without a level plane. Maybe the theory was to replicate the strength that nature gives an egg? At its opening the Citizen wrote that "should an elephant..come...to Ottawa it need have no fears about walking over the new...structure". The new bridge not only crossed the canal but spanned the railroad tracks too, linking the previously separated Theodore and Maria Streets, leading eventually to the decision to rename both in honour of Theodore Street's famous resident, Sir Wilfrid.

businesses along the canal

Lisgar or Ottawa CI. Teachers and staff celebrating 60th anniversary in 1906. This spring 175th

Magic lantern slide equipment at Pinhey's Point Historic site, Horaceville, www.tripadvisor.ca/LocationPhotoDirectLink-g155004-d1383097-i70115202-Pinhey_s_Point_Historic_Sit...

What a fantastic photo...this is a keeper!! It is so hard to imagine that the canal ever looked like this!!

Cartier Drill Hall! Wow! Thanks so much for sharing this fabulous image.

Never heard of the McCord Museum. Where or what is it?

It's amazing. That boat tied up may be the Rideau Queen that my great grand uncle captained.

This was so neat! A simple lifestyle

Magic lantern slides, Ottawa eBay.ca

I can see the drill hall behind the Ottawa Forward(?) building... What building is behind it?

Parliament Hill Ottawa, magic lantern, stereoscopic images, eBay.ca

It looks so rural and empty, it’s hard to believe what it’s become today - then again, even by 1896, it was already the downtown of a national capital!

Love the more natural look of the canal. Reminds me of waterways in European cities.

Lost Ottawa Book 1 and 2 available at Chapters / author David Mc Gee / fantastic info / great gift for Ottawa natives like me .... thanks Natalie and family 😜

Wow! You can see the cartier square drill hall in the back left. I had to look it up to believe it. Built in 1879

Best old photo of Ottawa ever. Thanks!

O wow very interesting to know. Thank you for showing us.

Great picture!

on a même la vue du Landsdown Park tout a droite au fond, très belle photo, merci!

Nice to see the contrast between then and now. And how the past allowed for today's transformation

Colour changes everything!!

Amazing photo!

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Saturday December 29th, 2018
Lost Ottawa

Here's a Lost Ottawa weekend outing for you ... skiing and tobogganing in Rockliffe Park.

Shared by Ben Weiss who writes:Rockcliffe Park... a great place to strap on skis in the 1920s...
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Heres a Lost Ottawa weekend outing for you ... skiing and tobogganing in Rockliffe Park.

Shared by Ben Weiss who writes:

14 CommentsComment on Facebook

Growing up in New Edinburgh and Manor Park, we spent many winter days there. The 21 Bumps. What a great hill to slide down. Lots of fun.

My dad used to tell me about a giant ski jump that ran down from Rockliffe Park to the river. It would have been about this era.

Did a lot of that in the late 40s. Easy access with streetcars - which what we should still have instead of billion dollar train which will not solve any problem.

One year our parents purchased a toboggan with a mat for the family to use on those hills, which seemed huge at the time. I don't think we had reached the total of seven siblings then but there were at least four or five. It was great fun going down the hills but not as much fun pulling the toboggan back up the hill.

My mom broke her hip skiing in rockliffe park in 1945...right before her fiance (my father) came back from three years away in WWII. When he arrived at the train station and she was not there, he thought she had decided to break off the relationship. He soon found out what really happened. They got married in 1946.

Our dad would walk there pulling us on a toboggan all the way from Overbrook. We'd play then he walked home again pulling 3 kids. Cathy Ritchie

went there a few times . The streetcar went not far from there .

Had lots of fun tobogganing there in the 50s.

We past so many winters sliding .What fun we had.I always came home frozen.

But only half f them have shadows!

I,be done that!

Early send pioneers. When jeans and no helmets ruled. Jeans James Doyle reminiscing

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Friday December 28th, 2018
Lost Ottawa

We research quite a few pics relating to Lost Ottawa Christmas traditions. Here's one from 1959 that got the better of me.

Fancy table cloth, nice candle setting, the fine china, and of course the turkey.

But I don't remember the paper chicken-hats!

(Photo: Malak, LAC 4949751)
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We research quite a few pics relating to Lost Ottawa Christmas traditions. Heres one from 1959 that got the better of me.

Fancy table cloth, nice candle setting, the fine china, and of course the turkey.

But I dont remember the paper chicken-hats!

(Photo: Malak, LAC 4949751)

41 CommentsComment on Facebook

Looks beautiful...family time enjoying each other and the holidays...no phones...the good old days!!!

Christmas crackers still have paper hats, but they're a LOT less fancy than those . . .

You always put on the " good " Christmas tablecloth or else the freshly ironed double damask tablecloth, the Christmas china, the sterling silver flatware and either the Christmas glasses or the crystal ones. You always dressed in your " Best " clothes and a Family picture was taken for posterity. So glad that these pictures were done so that we can see how we all have grown through the years.

we wore those hats at New Year's dinner, they came out of the paper noise making crackers

Our family always celebrated Christmas Eve (opened our gifts) and Christmas Day Dinner in our best clothes, best china and glassware by tradition. It was family time. I so miss my mom and dad.

better paper hats than cell phones

A little bit of humour... Mom looks tired, baby looks like he's about to cry because maybe little brother is pinching him? Grampa's watching dad to make sure he does a good job carving the turkey. At first I thought the older boy was on his phone but it looks like the person on his left is passing the cranberry sauce. Merry Christmas!πŸ˜…

You got them in those things you pulled both ends. I call them poppers. I remember wearing them.

Crepe paper party hats were popular for Xmas, New Years and Halloween. This Art Deco hat is from the 1920s. (Pinterest).

At first glance, I thought the boy to the right of father was looking at a smartphone, based on his intent downward gaze.

Crepe paper hats might be sold as novelties or in crackers.

This vintage crepe paper party hat might be more suited to Halloween than New Year's. goo.gl/images/xyL9WG

I remember Christmas Crackers with paper hats.

Now you can make your own Christmas Crackers. There are kits available.

Yes, the hats! We still wear them but these were chicken hats!!!! 😊

my mom always placed one of those paper pull t hings that snapped and they always had a paper hat in them.

Halloween crepe paper hat with owl c 1950s. eBay.ca

Fancy crepe paper party hats c 1930.

Vintage crepe paper party hat c. 1950s, collectable as ephemera. It is the kind of thing you might buy at Marks & Spencer. goo.gl/images/xyL9WG

What kind of toys came in older crackers? My family has them every year and every cracker treat is made of plastic now.

They look like they're from Christmas crackers, ours had paper crowns, but maybe back then they were different shapes.

And not a cellphone in sight!

Fabulous memories of years gone bu. Remember the hats, firecrackers.

Looks a lot like today except for the suits and ties !

... and Christmas crackers with those hats and a small toy in them. The good ole days!

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Friday December 28th, 2018
Lost Ottawa

Thomas Mellish shares the cover of his Christmas reading project. What could be better than a nice history of Ottawa!

Writes Thomas:Got this book for Christmas and I'm looking forward to reading it. But I have never heard the term 'City of the Big Ears' used before.
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Thomas Mellish shares the cover of his Christmas reading project. What could be better than a nice history of Ottawa!

Writes Thomas:

7 CommentsComment on Facebook

I think they misspelled *that fun forgot

Now the city with the walls with ears

Published in 1970 - never heard the term before then, and haven't heard it used anywhere else since.

Bob Haig was a wonderful , talented person with an equally wonderful family. He was a civil servant (NCC ?) and the owner of a small motel in the Blossom Park area of Bank Street. He was very active in the Greater Ottawa Motel Association at that time. I have an autographed copy (somewhere ?) This posting brings back memories of a different era.

I believe it had to do with the indigenous people of the area , the type of earnings that they wore.

I remember this

I'd love to hear more once available.

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Friday December 28th, 2018
Lost Ottawa

Maybe you were thinking of heading to the National Gallery in downtown Ottawa over the holidays. Take in a little art? Here's what used to stand there -- the Government Printing Bureau.

Built in the 1890s, this pic shows the Printing Bureau as it was in 1912, when two stories had been added on top.

All government printing used to take place there. The building was demolished circa 1958, when a new printing bureau was established in Hull.
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Maybe you were thinking of heading to the National Gallery in downtown Ottawa over the holidays. Take in a little art? Heres what used to stand there -- the Government Printing Bureau. 

Built in the 1890s, this pic shows the Printing Bureau as it was in 1912, when two stories had been added on top.

All government printing used to take place there. The building was demolished circa 1958, when a new printing bureau was established in Hull.

8 CommentsComment on Facebook

My late grandfather worked there until he was forced to retire at age 70 with no pension in those days. He used to put the metal letters into the wooden frames for printing, particularly the Hansard and other formal government notices. I remember visiting him at work at least once when I was very young and being impressed by the "high technology" of all those different size letters all sorted out in wooden holders ready for him to pick and place in the frames one by one by hand to compose text.

Love the fire escapes.

Looks like Major's Hill Park!!! Not the Elgin Street location of the Gallery

I remember when the Gallery was in the Museum.

Well we sure replaced it with a work of art!

My father worked there.

Voici une photo d'une presse à l'intérieur de ce bâtiment datant de Août 1914, avec mon grand père Émile Bérubé (à gauche accoudé sur la presse et Albert Roméo Nash son future beau frère accoudé sur la presse à droite)

My great Uncle Frank Smith worked there & my Great Aunt Maria Smith (siblings) was a Book binder there.

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Thursday December 27th, 2018
Lost Ottawa

Here's a special treat for the young ladies of Ottawa's St. Joseph's Orphanage on December 27, 1955.

That's when they got to see Peter Pan as well as Ali Baba and his Forty Thieves, courtesy of La Ligue de la Jeunesse Feminine.

Awesome double bill at the Theatre Francais on Dalhousie Street.

(City of Ottawa Archives CA036091)
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Heres a special treat for the young ladies of Ottawas St. Josephs Orphanage on December 27, 1955. 

Thats when they got to see Peter Pan as well as Ali Baba and his Forty Thieves, courtesy of La Ligue de la Jeunesse Feminine.

Awesome double bill at the Theatre Francais on Dalhousie Street.

(City of Ottawa Archives CA036091)

16 CommentsComment on Facebook

I remember going to the Francais theatre. They built Ottawa's first Holiday Inn there after they tore it down and now I think it is a Marriott Hotel.

I often went to Le Français as a child with my cousin Constance Roy.. The movie I remember best was Aurore l'Enfant Martyre, a melodrama during which we would boo and hiss loudly at poor Aurore's wicked step-mother who tortured her. We'd then cheer loudly when her husband finally found her out at the end of the movie. Great fun!

I also remember Willie Lamothe, who rode a horse down the aisle to the front and sang western songs, and picking his guitar.

I went there several times during my youth - we used to call it "le Frog" LOL

Foto-Nite. The predecessor to Fortnite.

Wasp like wimples of grey Sisters were sinister looking, terrifying.

I wonder how many of these orphans were eventually adopted, or never did and aged out of the system. 😐

There was also an Orphanage on Carling Avenue across from the Experimental Farm. Just on the top of the Hill going up Carling past Sherwood Drive. Eventually, it became a Daycare Center run by the City of Ottawa.

Used to go every Saturday in the late 50s early 60s for 2-3 movies, cartoons, a serial, popcorn, and a drink all for .50. It was great fun!

Cynthia Maynard -- My god, I had forgotten about the Francais Theatre! I sometimes was a truant and skipped classes to go and see a movie there during the day. I once saw the jazz trio The Ink Spots there, in mid-afternoon... they must have been on their downhill. I must have been 12 or 13 (1959-1960...). JC

I went to that "Couvent Mont St. Joseph" - it was a high school in the early 60's - there were still orphans then.

I wonder what happened to all those children πŸ™

Lost Ottawa Thank you for reposting this photo today as it would have been my father's 105th birthday today, December 27th. My father, Robert E. Maynard was the owner of the Francais theatre. That is my father in the background on the right hand side of photo. My mother was the president of La Lique de la Jeunesse Feminine and they both wanted to do something special for the orphans of St. Joseph.

Spent many a Saturday morning at the Francais! Great deal!

Why were there so many 'orphans'? There was no foster system in place for children who had been removed from their homes for their own safety. Women died in childbirth. Younger children who could not earn their way,went to the orphanage. Foundlings. Children who had been abandoned by desperate mothers/families. Illegitimate children. Look up "Butterbox Babies" sometime. These girls were the lucky ones. A cultural disapproval of adoption.

That's a lot of little kids. Sad that so many would be in an orphanage.

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Wednesday December 26th, 2018
Lost Ottawa

Ben Weiss shares more skiers in downtown Ottawa.

Says Ben:A 1920s photo of skiers waiting at the Chateau Laurier. (Waiting for what? A ride to somewhere else? Gatineau Hills maybe?)
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Ben Weiss shares more skiers in downtown Ottawa.

Says Ben:

13 CommentsComment on Facebook

I have book written by Herbert Marshall called History of the Ottawa Ski Club. That picture appears in the book. Written under it it says "Skiers at the entrance to the Underground Station near the Chateau Laurier. They are on their way to board the street car which will take them to Wrightville the starting point for the cross country ski hike to Dome Hill at Ironsides. Early 1920's."

Wasn't there a large man-made built toboggan hill that was built between the Chateau Laurier and the locks back in the day that had sliders going out onto the Ottawa River?

I can remember my parents saying that they used to take the streetcar to Wrightville and ski up the Gatineau from there. They also skied at Dome Hill with the Cliffside Ski Club and at the original Keogan's Lodge.

My folks talked about getting a bus to old Chelsea and ski into the hills to ski at Camp Fortune before it was open as a ski hill. They would ski into old Fortune lodge for lunch and ski back to Chelsea to get the bus home.

There waiting to compete in the 1920 Red Bull Crashed Ice course.

Look close, they are lined up to go through the door behind them. That would take them through to the track that was set up between the Chateau/rail tunnel and the locks.

A ride to Rockcliffe Park.

I wonder what those two dome roofed structures were.

The two domed structures are the stairs down to the platforms for the Hull Electric Railway under the Chateau Laurier terrace. The Hull streetcars crossed the outer decks of the Alexandra Bridge and served most of Hull as well as Aylmer. After a fire in 1946 they were replaced by Hull buses which used a terminal on George Street in the Market. The Camp Fortune buses had ski racks on the back into the 1960's or later.

Bus to Camp Fortune perhaps ?

They had a ski jump there for a while.

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Wednesday December 26th, 2018
Lost Ottawa

Here's something you can do work off some of that Christmas turkey -- a little cross country skiing along Dow's Lake or the Rideau Canal like these hardy Ottawa folk in December of 1955.

Me? I'm heading to to the "chesterfield," as my dad used to call it. He lay there quite often ... so I'm calling it a family tradition!

(City of Ottawa archives CA035900)
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Heres something you can do work off some of that Christmas turkey -- a little cross country skiing along Dows Lake or the Rideau Canal like these hardy Ottawa folk in December of 1955.

Me? Im heading to to the chesterfield, as my dad used to call it. He lay there quite often ... so Im calling it a family tradition!
 
(City of Ottawa archives CA035900)

9 CommentsComment on Facebook

One word just one word.. chesterfield.. zap. time warp... now I’m back in my old home, on the chesterfield watching my 12in? television.. haven’t heard that word in ages.. thanks for the memories

XC skiing was a fringe sport in the 1960s, when downhill (alpine) skiing was surging. In the mid-1970s, however, xc skiing started to make a big comeback, with very low-cost skis, poles and boots (packages) being sold at places like Canadian Tire. The NCC had gorgeous trails for Ottawans to enjoy, for free!

Lots of places to x-country ski in Ottawa.

I'd cross country ski behind our house between airport parkway and walkley area. There were little hills the city made when they put the parkway in and those made for great fun for a little kid.

My mom used to live near dows lake. We had some good ski outings there.

I still call it the chesterfield!

Looks like my grandma back in the day

Used to x country ski along the Ottawa River on the bicycle paths in Britannia.

Cross country skiing as a child, somewhere in the Gatineau Hills if I remember correctly. My Dad would make us go for long distances (that's what it felt like, anyway), we'd hit a small hut, drink a hot drink from a thermos and head back. I always envied those who went downhill skiing -

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Wednesday December 26th, 2018
Lost Ottawa

Winter in Rockledge Terrace in 1955, when the town houses (do you call them that?) there were brand new.

It looks greener now, at least, surrounded by trees. Same developer as Manor Park?

Rockledge Road is in behind Mark Motors, near the corner of St. Laurent and Montreal Road.

( City of Ottawa Archives CA035857-W)
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Winter in Rockledge Terrace in 1955, when the town houses (do you call them that?) there were brand new.

It looks greener now, at least, surrounded by trees. Same developer as Manor Park? 

Rockledge Road is in behind Mark Motors, near the corner of St. Laurent and Montreal Road.

( City of Ottawa Archives CA035857-W)

16 CommentsComment on Facebook

Looks like our old house in Manor Park..

This is just shortly before we moved into Manor Park.

Think we just called them “row houses” and term “townhouse” came about in the 70s.

I lived in Manor pk for a while. 909 Glasgow.

Lived in Manor park too. 65 Braemar street across from the school

Is this Brittany Drive now?

corner of Rockledge & Quarry

Wow, we lived at 533 Rockledge Road back in the early 70's. Before any of the houses were built in front of it. The trees were much smaller then too. My dad used to practice hitting golf balls off the front lawn, and send me out in the fields looking for them!

Rockledge??? Rockcliffe is next to it but never heard of Rockledge

I lived in Manor Park as a kid. The row houses looked similar to this as I recall.

Brittany Drive and Truro Street. I know the area well!

Lorianne Mac Aodh

Very cool!

Diane O'Neill check it out.

Now it’s a shithole

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Wednesday December 26th, 2018
Lost Ottawa

When skiing or skating outdoors around Ottawa in the old days, there always seemed to be some clankety old boiler you could warm your hands on.

Here's the heater at Camp Fortune where Marion Dunning, Sally Sturgeon, Jay Fripp and Joan Heggtveit are warming up after watching a day of racing in 1956.

(City of Ottawa Archives CA036334)
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When skiing or skating outdoors around Ottawa in the old days, there always seemed to be some clankety old boiler you could warm your hands on.

Heres the heater at Camp Fortune where Marion  Dunning, Sally Sturgeon, Jay Fripp and Joan Heggtveit are warming up after watching a day of racing in 1956.

(City of Ottawa Archives CA036334)

21 CommentsComment on Facebook

I remember Jay Fripp from Ridgemont High School. This brings back happy memories of skating at our local rink at the end of our street, Foxbar Ave, just south of Walkley road off Bank St.

I remember skating at the outdoor rink at Knightsbridge and Lockhart in the West End, behind Our Lady of Fatima school. Hockey rink with boards and skating rink along side it. The Shack had a wood burning stove. One night a week they played music and allowed public skating on the hockey rink. Spent many days and evenings playing “crack the whip.” Good memories

With wooden skis and leather straps to fasten them to ski boots of the day or even regular winter boots LOL

Cool! Great idea then, organic!

I think it’s interesting to remember what we wore in those days....no “technical” fabrics...I’m pretty sure we were a lot colder and wetter then....I know I was!

Reminds me of the days in Fisher Heights at the school rink. In the evenings the shack was monitored by volunteer parents. Even my Dad who couldn’t skate an inch. Nor could I barely volunteered so the local youth could have an evening of fun. Many men from the community pitched in to man the shack. Those certainly were the days when community was also family.

My mom's first skis were bought at Heggtveit's which I think were on Bank Street and was probably the first ski/sporting goods store in Ottawa.

Park Nault we had a wood stove in the middle boys on one side girls on the other side Play hockey outside at minus 20 put ball pepper in our socks to keep our toes warm )don t think it work) but we had so much fun

We had municipal skating rinks around Ottawa in the old days. We had one before the war where Fisher Park High School is now. It had a hockey rink with boards and lights in the middle, and a skating rink around the outside! No hockey allowed on the skating rink! There was always a changing shack with a barrel stove for warming up. After a snow storm the users helped with the clearing. This design was typical and very functional! A bit of Ottawa folk history.

Brings back memories of the skating shack in North Gower!

How well I remember huddling around the " heater" at Fortune as well as the one in the hut at the skating rink in Manor Park trying to thaw out.....😍

I remember that name, Heggtveit . One of the pillers of Ottawa area ski world.

I grew up on Lyon st and still have fond memories of the Gladstone rink, the shack with heat, the Strouss Waltzes over the loud speaker and the big winter carnival with costumes

Did plenty of skiing here as well.... great fun...

Learned to skate at the Fisher Park rink, was a video of me & my Aunt Donna trying & it wasn't pretty-LOL

Fond memories of growing up in Ottawa, winters were fun!

Remember the « shack » at the local rink on Bathurst?

Miss those days!

we went on the streetcar from Westboro to the rink at Fisher/Richmond, there was a shack like this, and music !!!πŸ˜„

Yes in Riverview Park

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Tuesday December 25th, 2018
Lost Ottawa

The inside of Union Station done up for an Ottawa Christmas circa 1955, featuring a giant tree on the staircase up to Rideau Street.

Below the tree, the famous tunnel to the Chateau Laurier.

(CSTM CN 49923)
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The inside of Union Station done up for an Ottawa Christmas circa 1955, featuring a giant tree on the staircase up to Rideau Street.

Below the tree, the famous tunnel to the Chateau Laurier.

(CSTM CN 49923)

42 CommentsComment on Facebook

I can see me stepping off a streetcar and down those stairs and through the tunnel every Sunday to go swimming in the chateau pool. Great memories. Norm

This view, original lights, and tunnel to the Chateau, has been renewed in the recently renovated station, now renamed the Senate of Canada Building. It now looks pretty much the same!

Dave McGee: please include this post in your Lost Ottawa Book 3!!! This picture is beautiful!

That is really neat... I’m not old enough to remember this but my mom arrived to her new life in Ottawa at this startion

When I was a kid I went through the tunnel many times as Iived in Lower Town. This has been a memory for me.

This city can be stupid with their decisions

Such a beautiful building. Could have been greatly used still! If only.....

Loved this tree each year. As we went to meet Grandad coming in on his engine (he was a CP Engineer) we would walk down the stairs past the tree, standing at the bottom and stare at it in Awe! Such a great memory.

Hindsight is 20/20 but that's sure nicer than whatever barn they have in the middle of nowhere these days.

Does anyone remember the barber shop in the tunnel? I wonder if it's still there.

A magnificent building as such should be reopened to the public not only to politicians

Ottawa's downtown train station was viable when all of Ottawa lived within a few miles of it. But by the late 50s, few people lived downtown and had moved to the suburbs, There were no direct routes downtown and no parking when you got there. The trains were noisy and dirty and train tracks ran al l along the Canal. It's ridiculous to say that the current station is in the "middle of nowhere." It's right by the Queebsway and Vaier Vader parkway/Riverside and has good access for taxuis, cars, and public transit. And there's parking. Ottawa is ot a major station loke like Toronto or Montreal. It's not on the way anywhere and people don't change trains here. A lot of amenities are not needed.

I loved going from the Chateau to the staton via the tunnel. It sloped downward so you could run and then slide. Obviously those were the days before running shoes.

Did they restore the tunnel with the renovations?

Was a lovely place... gone now πŸ™

SO-O-O-O impressive to small Valley town kid. And you could swim at Chateau pool -- in the winter. ???WHY isn't this the main station for "Confederation" LRT line???

What a beautiful historical building, I remember taking the train there

nice I use to play there πŸ™‚

I remember go to the train station to go to Montreal

I share special memories as well, my Dad's office was upstairs at the back of the station, he was a CPR Roadmaster whose territory was the M & O.

beautiful, but REEKED of cigarette smoke, night and day. There was small area, desk with phone, Traveller's Aid, staffed with navy blue uniformed ladies

Is this still accessible?

So, what's with the V's, was CNR all out of U's, early bilingual signage?

Wow, miss that beautiful station!

Ran through that tunnel many times! My grandparents would take us to the Grill at the Chateau Laurier as a treat and the greatest fun was playing in the tunnel afterwards. This would have been in the mid ‘50s.

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Tuesday December 25th, 2018
Lost Ottawa

When you get that new tricycle for Christmas, you just don't care how much ice there is in Ottawa ...

(City of Ottawa Archives CA035528)
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When you get that new tricycle for Christmas, you just dont care how much ice there is in Ottawa ...

(City of Ottawa Archives CA035528)

20 CommentsComment on Facebook

I post this picture of a Toronto Christmas in 1954 when I got a new CCM bike. No snow!

Nothing has changed in 2018. Our street looks like that today.

I had one for Christmas so i did put a lot of nails in the tires as studs so i could use it right away!

This little kid may well have grown up to be one of those adults who rides their bike all year, in all manner of weather. Bravo kiddo! Lots of people are doing this these days. Saves on gas, and get exercise too... if you can bear all the weather!!

I just love this picture!! ❀️

Looks like Ott West between Holland -Churchill.

My dad put blocks on the pedals so I could reach them

anyone know what street this is?

That was me haha. BMX in January.

I think it is Rockliffe Way heading north.

Love those gambrel roofed houses, grew up in one in Westboro

yes, a BIG tricycle....mine was blue and white, about age 5, like 1948...so big, it had wooden blocks on the pedals...ha ahhaha...so much zoom, zoom, too

I had one a lot like that, maybe a shade smaller. Covered a lot of miles on Daly Ave! Back and forth! πŸ™‚

Remembering the excitement of the Christmas morning I got a shiny red scooter. Love that sweet pic, Dave!

WHAT??? NO HELMET, NO FACE GUARD, NO GOGGLES, NO SHIN PADS, KNEE PADS, ELBOW PADS, SHOULDER PADS, METAL GLOVES, CONSTRUCTION BOOTS, OR STUDDED SNOW TIRES ON THE TRICYCLE??? Must report it to that gang at City Hall. ;p They are missing out on another cash cow. HAHAHA

Loved Westboro

Ice smoothes over potholes!

Is this Lindenlea?

Pis tu as crevé les pneus

Ream Ay

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Tuesday December 25th, 2018
Lost Ottawa

Christmas Greetings from Lost Ottawa!

Here's an Xmas postcard from the Tuck postcard company circa 1908 and with plenty of "lost."

On the far left the Russell House Hotel, then the ramshackle stairs that that took you to J.R. Booth's Canada Atlantic Railway station (before there was a Union Station).

Next you have the block of buildings and the Old Post Office where the War Memorial stands today. In front of that, what I always think of as Ottawa's "Bermuda Triangle," which was the huge gap between Sappers and Dufferin bridges, with the Rideau Canal below.

All the best to everyone!
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Christmas Greetings from Lost Ottawa!

Heres an Xmas postcard from the Tuck postcard company circa 1908 and with plenty of lost.

On the far left the Russell House Hotel, then the ramshackle stairs that that took you to J.R. Booths Canada Atlantic Railway station (before there was a Union Station). 

Next you have the block of buildings and the Old Post Office where the War Memorial stands today. In front of that, what I always think of as Ottawas Bermuda Triangle, which was the huge gap between Sappers and Dufferin bridges, with the Rideau Canal below.

All the best to everyone!

8 CommentsComment on Facebook

From a collection of Christmas postcards found at the family farmstead (in Grey County).

Thank you for posting, hanging on to it especially for today (if that’s what you did). This is truly a special find. What a gift! Hugs to you. OMG

Beautiful scene of Ottawa. It sure has changed...

Merry Christmas David!

To plan your trip, you can read the Baedeker guide's Ottawa section: archive.org/details/03077397.5410.emory.edu/page/n271 Your room in the Russell house hotel will run you $2.50-$4.00 per night.

Merry Christmas everyone

Beautiful.

Wow. Love it. Xoxo

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Monday December 24th, 2018
Lost Ottawa

Santa skips the reindeer on this visit to Ottawa, December 1, 1955.

Instead he arrived at Uplands aboard the "Santa Toy Lift," bringing gifts to kids at the St. Patrick's Home and the St. Jospeh's Orphanage.

(City of Ottawa Archives CA035667)
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Santa skips the reindeer on this visit to Ottawa, December 1, 1955.

Instead he arrived at Uplands aboard the Santa Toy Lift, bringing gifts to kids at the St. Patricks Home and the St. Jospehs Orphanage.

(City of Ottawa Archives CA035667)

6 CommentsComment on Facebook

The plane was indeed a C46, flying for Operation Toylift - a charitable initiative started by Julian Reiss, one of the founders of the very successful Sana Claus village at North Pole, NY. Reiss began with his own Stinson tail-dragger, but the popularity of the Toylift prompted Esso Oil to offer the use of one of its C-46 aircraft (hence the Esso logo on the plane.) A wonderful Christmas story! www.flyingadventures.com/images/Aviator-Profiles/Julian-Reiss-Operation-Toylift.pdf

I saw Santa arrive by plane at Uplands in 1957. Also visited Santa's Village at North Pole New York (a theme park). Here I am shaking his hand at Uplands with my mother, sister and brother.

Who remembers the TV station identified as "WPTZ Plattsburgh, Norh Pole, Burlington"? Until I looked at this post, it never occurred to me to wonder why there was a North Pole, New York. www.youtube.com/watch?v=FHwHTVrJXC4

Anyone got more info on this? I can tell its a C-46 but what company was it owned by? Not too many of those made it into the civilian world. A colour picture ( if any) would be great. Id like to make up a profile of this

Eastern Airlines used to have Santa in a sleigh greet arriving Eastern flights at Uplands. We saw Santa greet our flight into Ottawa in 1973. My 4 year old daughter was very excited to see him arrive when we did.

Does anyone remember the two cakes you used to get as a treat for Christmas?!!

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Monday December 24th, 2018
Lost Ottawa

Christmas shopping at Ottawa's St. Hubert appliance store sale in December of 1955.

This one caught my eye because TV's were still rather new then -- a great Christmas gift.

But would kids these days even recognize these as TV's? And what do they think we mean when we say "glued to the box?"

As for St. Hubert's, I want to say Rideau Street. Or Eastview?

(City of Ottawa Archives CA036001-W)
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Christmas shopping at Ottawas St. Hubert appliance store sale in December of 1955.

This one caught my eye because TVs were still rather new then -- a great Christmas gift. 

But would kids these days even recognize these as TVs? And what do they think we mean when we say glued to the box?

As for St. Huberts, I want to say Rideau Street. Or Eastview?

(City of Ottawa Archives CA036001-W)

14 CommentsComment on Facebook

the guy in the bowler hat, talking on his cell.

I remember when we got the 3rd channel, CJOH in 1961.

I still have our 1st tv, an RCA Victor, not the original rabbit ears around 1950!!!

Ours was a 21" Admiral that Dad got at the start of June 1953 just before CBOT went on the air for the first time the day before Queen Elizabeth's coronation.

Bank Street at James. From the Journal, Dec. 14, 1954:

I can remember that the top surface of the tv was a place to adorn with something decorative...we had a lamp and a small cacti on top of ours.

That front window looks too modern & full glass for Rideau — Eastview more likely. But I don’t know St Hubert Appliances ...

I remember alpha TV and stereo in the glebe was kind of like this place. I'd rather buy from this type of place than a best buy. Bleekers was the last hold out I believe. I'm guessing a McDonald's is there now 😑

There was Hughes (sp) Appliances on Rideau St...

Yes, everyone wanted one of those Babies back then. And so much variety! As I recall it was all one channel, CBC, for the longest time. And most of the time you got to look at Pontiac the Indian and listen to the dial tone. Exciting times...! πŸ™‚

Yup. We had one of those big ugly box tv’s. For about a year channel 4 alternated English/French programing until channel 9 came on the air.

We had a 19 inch crosely sp) in 1954 in Smiths Falls channels 4- ottawa 7 watertown and 11 Kingston

And if you needed a lamp to sit on top of your tv, they had plenty.

We could fine tune reception by turning the antennae just slightly

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Monday December 24th, 2018
Lost Ottawa

Last day for Ottawa your Xmas shopping at Carlingwood? You might need a cup of tea and a bite to eat ... no, not at the "food court," at the lunch counter!

The original record doesn't say so, but I believe this is the lunch counter in the Carlingwood Woolworth's in 1956, when it was brand new (and I'm guessing Woolworths by the stuff for sale on the tables).

(City of Ottawa Archives CA037442)
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Last day for Ottawa your Xmas shopping at Carlingwood? You might need a cup of tea and a bite to eat ... no, not at the food court, at the lunch counter!

The original record doesnt say so, but I believe this is the lunch counter in the Carlingwood Woolworths in 1956, when it was brand new (and Im guessing Woolworths by the stuff for sale on the tables).

(City of Ottawa Archives CA037442)

69 CommentsComment on Facebook

Still like sitting at the counter in any restaurant that has one!

Loved the fries!!

This one is a classic, organic. Look at the servers how neatly dressed they are in their uniforms, which made it appealing to go and buy your food. No sloppiness, it was perfect, as well as authentic. Miss the classics πŸ’πŸŒΌβ˜•οΈπŸ΅πŸ¨πŸ”πŸŒ­πŸ½

Wasn’t there a lunch counter at Tamblyns? I think they had a couple of booths too

Those of us who grew up with Woolworth's took it for granted. In 1974, my then wife and I visited Tijuana, Mexico. Not sure where we should trust the menu, we settled on Worthworth's. It was a welcome sight. The lunch counter was exactly the same as at Carlingwood with one major exception. In front of every third stool there was a bowl of jalepeno peppers. Other than that, and a few items on the menu, the menu was the same as back home - and the store looked exactly the same. It was a bit surreal.

I don't remember that one, but I do remember a similar lunch counter at the Woolworths at Billings Bridge Plaza. It was located at the end of the mall closest to Bank Street.

I am thinking the old Tamblyn's soda counter! Am I wrong?

I remember being 9 and we would take the 95 bus for french fries and a drink sitting at the counter. My friends were 11 so they took care of me. Nothing but great memories!

Reminds me of the Lunch Counter at Westgate Drug Store,food was great.

There was a lunch counter on the left in Zellars were the rexall is now.There was also one in sears and tamblins.

Sears also had a lunch counter on the main floor right beside the mall entrance.

That was a great place. I remember it well.

Going into Pembroke from Camp Petawawa was a real treat if we got to go to Woolworths - classic pic.

Love the uniforms and the professional look of the lunch counter. Ah, the old days....

Malted milks. There and at Westgate too.

Oh yes, I do remember this very well!

Did anybody go to Broadview for grades 7 and 8 around 1967 - 69?

I remember a lunch counter midway between Sears and Loblaws but the counter was on the left side when you walked in. I too worked at Carlingwood. Sears 76 to 78. And Boots pharmacy in 75.

I recall the lunch counter at Tamblyns. What happened to that chain? I worked at the lunch counter in both Zellers and Woolworth years later. 80 cents an hour. Big times!!

I remember the smell of the deep fryers from that store. Carlingwood was my second home as a kid. My Mum worked in Sears forever.

I think you are right! Carlingwood, at the very back was an office area in that squared off box, also the "back door" to the rear parking lot to the left of it, where the other ladies are.

best egg salad sandwiches ever.

It was still there in the 70s. Look at all the servers!

Where was the restaurant located vis a vis today’s mall? Near the Loblaws or near the Tim Hortons?

Ate there so often with mom. It was the reward to a hard day of shopping. Great memories.

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Monday December 24th, 2018
Lost Ottawa

Your Christmas Commute through downtown Ottawa ... I hope not!

Actually, this is the morning puzzler. The year is 1956, and I was thinking this was road down from St. Patrick and Sussex to the Alexandra Bridge.

Then I was thinking it could be coming down Albert from Bronson and swinging around on Commissoner Street to Wellington ...

Wherever it is, all those people out of their cars can't have been too happy.

(City of Ottawa CA037599)
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Your Christmas Commute through downtown Ottawa ... I hope not! 

Actually, this is the morning puzzler. The year is 1956, and I was thinking this was road down from St. Patrick and Sussex to the Alexandra Bridge.

Then I was thinking it could be coming down Albert from Bronson and swinging around on Commissoner Street to Wellington ...

Wherever it is, all those people out of their cars cant have been too happy.

(City of Ottawa CA037599)

18 CommentsComment on Facebook

Because of the railings on the left my first impression was "Why are there cars driving on the canal?". I need new glasses.

I would guess that the picture was taken from the bridge that used to go between Nepean Point and Major’s Hill Park

The fellow walking to work on the sidewalk has it made.

I think that Kai Pau's suggestion is correct. Elgin St. and the Queen Elizabeth Driveway were realigned some time between 1958 and 1965. Before that point they joined in a Y junction just north of the railway overpass. If you go to Google Street View and put yourself on the Queensway overpass, you can still see the townhouses in the background (51-61 Argyle). If you zoom in on the GeoOttawa screen capture, you can even see the shadows cast by the poplar trees and the retaining wall on the west side of the intersection.

Flashback memory of the “Flink Flink Flink “ of tire chains.

I am stumped... It appears they are taking it looking down from either a building or bridge...

End of Rideau Street heading onto the bridge to Eastview (Vanier)? What is the large building in the background?

The car in the 50s for Ottawans must have been more of a burden than a blessing for transportation during our real winter months. Rear wheel drive ,terrible heaters if any in the car .the city snow ploughing system not mastered yet ,no rear window defogger invented yet don't we remember those plastic stick on for the rear window etc. O T C slogan said something about "Smart people take the bus" In hind sight I think they were accurate.πŸšŒπŸšŽπŸ€“

Definitely the railway underpass at the foot of Elgin Street and the Driveway where the Queensway is now. Not the Alexandra Bridge and not Lebreton Flats.

Scott Street hill. Thats a view down to Lebreton Flats.

The building in the distance looks like the row of townhouses on Argyle Avenue at the corner of Elgin Street. If so, the photographer would have to have been standing on the railway viaduct just south of Catherine Street looking north up Elgin.

Could be your second choice of Bronson to Wellington. For some reason, the first thing I thought of was Scot Street to Bayswater Avenue but I am not sure if there is another street rearing to the right. Looking head-on.

The telegraph lines suggest Elgin at the CNR line that is now the Queensway... I am unsure there were ever lines like that at Bronson & Wellington, or at the bottom of Rideau Street...

It almost looks like Slater ( it may still be Scott at this point) looking down the hill to the west. That building on the left looks like the old Merkley building supply building. Probably wrong but it just looks that way to me.

Even in 1956, people didn't clear the snow from their windshields. Lol

I agree with John Forrest. It looks like the deep cut.

Greenfield/King Edward/Lees perhaps

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Sunday December 23rd, 2018
Lost Ottawa

Music for an Ottawa Christmas week as found in the CFRA Top 30 for December 20 1969.

I see one Ottawa band on there -- The Marshmallow Soup Group!

Neil Diamond at Number One. Good songwriter, I know, but I never did take a liking to him.

(Shared by Ken Clavette)
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Music for an Ottawa Christmas week as found in the CFRA Top 30 for December 20 1969.

I see one Ottawa band on there -- The Marshmallow Soup Group!

Neil Diamond at Number One. Good songwriter, I know, but I never did take a liking to him.

(Shared by Ken Clavette)

28 CommentsComment on Facebook

Neil Diamond next to Led Z, that’s unnatural...

Neil Diamond was a favorite back in the day. youtu.be/RQwqQwD6OOw

Nice to see Mainline on the charts. One of the best bands ever from Toronto.

When I was a kid, I thought Neil Diamond was a very old man because of his voice. I never liked him either. Not many songs on this list I like.

My husband agrees with you. He never liked Neil Diamond...

Alsothe Poppy Family is a Canadian group.

Top albums: Beatles, Zeppelin & the Stones - not bad.

I was probably dancing in my diapers to these hits.

Couple more Canadian bands there, can anyone name them

Led Zeppelin in second... and a French song on there to boot! When’s the last time THAT happened on a non-French station?

Je T'Aime, ha ha. God that was awful.

CFRA was THE music station back in the day. I was 13 years old in 1969

I assume the number in brackets beside the song name is the position it was in the previous week but does anyone know what “pp” stood for? I’m guessing it had something to do with its first time being on the charts..

Thanks for posting this. It's from the year I was born. Interesting to see the CFRA best seller list from back then. I grew up listening to CFRA and remember meeting Mark Elliot (their most popular radio personality at the time) at the opening of the Rideau Centre. I think I was about 14 years old so around 1983. I just remember being super excited about meeting him because I had listened to him on CFRA for several years and I thought he was fantastic. I have a 19 year old daughter and the kids from that generation don't realize that AM radio ruled back then. I also listed to CFGO which was also popular but CFRA ruled the airwaves back then. You only listened to FM if you were into alternative music (at least in the 80's).

I could never get into Neil Diamond either! But you have to love tne diversity of radio in the late 60's Led Zepplin to the Archies, with a little Motown and jazz, Blood Sweat and Tears, all wrapped in one week of hits. Never happen now everything fits in somebody's idea of a formula!

Susan, nice to see the Poppy Family climbing up the Ottawa charts in Dec 1969! πŸ˜€

Major Hoople's album re-released... axerecords.ca/shop/major-hooples-boarding-house/

Some killer tunes on that list!

I would hire them for dances at Algonquin College. Great band.

I just gotta check more out from "The Marshmallow Soup Group" just cause of that name

Major Hooples Boarding House. Saw them at a bar in Kingston in the 70’s.

Did not 580 eventually become the Bear or something like that in the 80's?

hah. I "dated" The Marshmallow Soup Group! *false blush. For a time, they had a really nice "family" (home)? on First Avenue just below Bronson.. just to say *wink

Around this time our teacher asked us to name our favourite groups and she'd write them on the blackboard. Someone said the Marshmallow Soup Group. The teacher wrote "Marshmallow Submarine Group".

Loved McKenna Mendelson Mainline

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Sunday December 23rd, 2018
Lost Ottawa

Is there still time? You could grab your Lost Ottawa Christmas Tree at Carlingwood?

Actually, I think I saw a sign for Christmas trees there the other day ...

(City of Ottawa Archives CA042421-W)
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Is there still time? You could grab your Lost Ottawa Christmas Tree at Carlingwood?

Actually, I think I saw a sign for Christmas trees there the other day ...

(City of Ottawa Archives CA042421-W)

4 CommentsComment on Facebook

You can still get a tree at the back near the library.

Yes, they actually had an old school tree lot set up by the library

Big sale coming up next week πŸ˜€

Sunday December 23rd, 2018
Lost Ottawa

Sunday Drive through Ottawa's original park in 1898, showing what a winter outing was like back in the day!

This is another silent clip from the NFB archives. Alas, nothing can be done about the ugly watermarks. You learn to look past them!
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Neat. Can anyone hazard a guess as to orientation...where are the carriages coming from and where are they likely going to(from the perspective of the current orientation of the park)?

Wow. So amazing that the film has not washed away. Thanks for finding and sharing....these old films are precious...

The shadows indicate that the sun is on the left so unless they were driving early in the day, the picture is looking north.

Thanks a look a the past

Quite a busy place.

NFB - great stuff!

Beautiful

Which park?

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Saturday December 22nd, 2018
Lost Ottawa

Here's a little Ottawa Christmas shopping for you, in what I believe is Freiman's in Westgate, no date.

The first part features ladies at the perfume counter, but the real fun starts about 24 seconds in.

Those ladies with their hats are hilarious!

(NFB Archives 7952)
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Loved the hats wouldn’t mind one or two of the for myself

Just look how much things have changed!!!! Everyone always dressed up even just to go shopping, now some even go shopping in their PJ’s... kinda sad really

That style was still in fashion in 1959 the year I got married. ....C

I liked the blond - she had a sense of style :). It was likely around 1955 as that was when Westgate opened and they would be looking for publicity. Also, these styles remind me of photos of my mom from that year. And yes, even as a very young girl, I had to be dressed up to go shopping. People were much more formal in those days.

Had to look good for they’re manπŸ‘¨

Jackie Kennedy style hats

Love it! But also love the one hat that looks like today’s styrofoam takeout bowl! Ha! But honestly, the sophistication is gone these days. These ladies had class in their wardrobe and not all about how much cleavage they can show.

dressed immaculately to go shopping...furs and pearls and makeup done just right...love it...

I remember that hat tree very well!

Salad bowl hat?

N. Adele Semenick

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Saturday December 22nd, 2018
Lost Ottawa

Following up on the Ottawa Wendy's that burned down at Lincoln Fields ...

Here's shot from Friday, shared by Mike Maxsom.
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Following up on the Ottawa Wendys that burned down at Lincoln Fields ... 

Heres shot from Friday, shared by Mike Maxsom.

15 CommentsComment on Facebook

Fyi: In this photo , the Wendy's is to the left of the photo. The Wendy's is not even visable in this photo.

Did anyone else notice the skeleton on the chiropractors building next Fort is wearing a firemen’s uniform.

My husband was chatting with someone who had attended a meeting regarding future plans for Lincoln Fields. Sounds as if where the Wendy's was is going to be a new Metro building and the larger building itself is going to be turned into condos with stores on the lower level. I can remember when they used to have a disco on the top story of the building way back in the day.

Been following the LF rejuvenation project for a while. Hopefully, with Wendy’s down, this might speed up the process? Unfortunately for some. Also, with LRT Phase 2 in motion, this will attract prospective investors.

must have just been cleaned up - it was still standing on Thursday

Yes, the dining area portion of the building was the last remnants standing, aside from the rear dumpster housing, Thursday night. Shouldn't say 'another quality project.' More like another sad loss.

That was quick. I hope they build a new Wendy's.

I hope they rebuild. I really enjoyed the part with the glass roof. Probably the nicest fast food restaurant in Ottawa.

really sad good memories of going there with family πŸ™

That was fast.

Not likely the mall is being torn down

Thursday night.

Jordan Mahusky

I know the guy who did it. It's a shame he went off the deep end πŸ™

sad

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Saturday December 22nd, 2018
Lost Ottawa

The Freiman's Santa Claus parade was a huge deal back in the '50s and '60s. Here's two shots of the parade coming out of Little Sussex Street (and the back door of Union Station).

First two Elves, the majorettes and a marching band, then Santa and his reindeer on a float. Santa would have just come to the station by train after arriving in Vars by helicopter.

Date would be appear to be 1956. The City Archives has a picture of an identical-looking float for that year -- which was the first year of Santa's Mystery Special.

(Vanier Museopark MVM.2016.P.0008.0001.D)
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The Freimans Santa Claus parade was a huge deal back in the 50s and 60s. Heres two shots of the parade coming out of Little Sussex Street (and the back door of Union Station). 

First two Elves, the majorettes and a marching band, then Santa and his reindeer on a float. Santa would have just come to the station by train after arriving in Vars by helicopter.

Date would be appear to be 1956. The City Archives has a picture of an identical-looking float for that year -- which was the first year of Santas Mystery Special.

(Vanier Museopark MVM.2016.P.0008.0001.D)Image attachment

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"...marching band" is the Band of the Governor General's Foot Guards. The parade has just turned off Little Sussex St. onto Rideau after welcoming Santa at the Union Station.

What's missing from today's streetscapes: Neon signs. They supplied something coldly glamorous that we've never replaced

Young fellow wearing the zipped fur lined hooded coat. Hated them. Always got my hair caught in the zipper

I was probably watching the parade somewhere

Really cool! My dad worked at Freeman’s back in the 50’s

It looks like the parade is coming down into Rideau past Little Sussex from in front of the train station. The crowd of spectators blocks Little Sussex by the Transportation Building on the left.

Thanks for sharing and Merry Christmas

Ottawa was a much warmer place in those days.

I remember taking the train to go get Santa in Vars. My mother worked at Freimans at the time and employees would get tickets!

I was probably in the band (Governor General Foot Guards) playing snare drum

It would be hard to run a parade there nowadays, with those overpasses crushing everything below. Plus Rideau Centre, which sucked life off the street.

Those are great photos.

It's interesting that Rideau Street was then considered the preferred parade route. After all the "improvement" projects it is now secondary to Bank (and that's not even a going concern commercially).

From the Ottawa Journal, November 9, 1956, pg. 37 col. 7

Lee Jolliffe

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Saturday December 22nd, 2018
Lost Ottawa

Dennis Lloyd shares this memory of an Ottawa corner store:Last time I saw a small paper bag this size was at Ernie's Sundries, Cobden Rd. at Iris St., 1960s:
"Umm...yeah...I'd like 2 mint leaves, 2 licorice pipes, 1 jawbreaker, 3 jujubes, 1 wax lips, 4 black balls - the good ones with the rainbow centres...oh, and a candy necklace for my little sister --- here's my quarter."
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Dennis Lloyd shares this memory of an Ottawa corner store:

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Used to go to Archie's on Richmond Road near Woodroffe Ave. Drove Archie crazy because we took so long to make up our mind what candies we wanted. This was in the mid 50's on our way home from swimming in the Ottawa River at the end of Woodroffe.

We got a nickel allowance and would get 5 cent mixed candy. I remember it was 3 for a penny, so that was 15 candies. It was so exciting!

How about Yaghi’s in the Glebe. 25 cents went a long way back then.

If you're really that nostalgic, Preston Hardware still will sell you small fittings (bolts, washers, etc. ) in a similar small paper bag πŸ™‚

My go-to store for a bag of candy when I was young was Paul's Sundries on Bank St near Heron. Blackballs, pixie sticks and wax lips. Yum...

And who remembers those corner stores that had those display cabinets for testing burnt out tv tubes?

I remember 10¢ would fill that bag. Mojo's were my favourite.

My tiny bag was full of mojo’s, black liquorice babies, bottle caps and Fun Dip πŸ˜„β€οΈπŸ‘ŒπŸ»

All the little stores had those and the penny candies! I loved those times. Also the red lips!

at Gordy Wong's we filled and calculated our own candy bags πŸ™‚

My cousin us to buy the black balls. 1 cent for 5. He had a quarter. Drove us, especially my mother as he sat crunching them all night.

Small's was our go to in the 60's and 70's for penny candy! They were located on Carling and Stevenson.

They used to be called Grab-bags and cost anywhere from a dime to a quarter. Always a good assortment of candy.

Miss those days.Remember the round, red and white cardboard container with potato sticks inside for 5 cents?

Yes! We used to pool our pennies and come out of Ernie's with a whole bag of candy to share.

Andy at Dempsey’s in Russell Road...penny candy in a little brown paper bag. Moe Joes, pixie sticks, lickamade...so many wonderful memories associated with penny candy ❀️

Wistaff's on Cyrville Road in Ottawa East

Oh, I remember those little bags well....filled with candy from the corner store.

Sgt Rock Comic Book, drink and a candy for 25 cents

10 cent bag of mixed up candy. My favourite!

Damn. That brings back memories from the Crow Lake general store. Also there’s a gas station/ general store that still does that near Cobden, ON area.

Silver Dragon Chinese Food is still there at the Cobden Plaza.....

French fries used to be sold in a bag this size...

Ernie's sundries.. there's a place I haven't heard about in a long time. I too lived on Cobden Rd in the 60s. The Colonial Mall was really very nice

What’s this world coming to? They don’t even make candy the way they used to!

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Friday December 21st, 2018
Lost Ottawa

Here's a short film clip shot in Ottawa, taken from the NFB's online archive of silent footage.

It depicts the Duke of Devonshire arriving on Parliament Hill for the Opening of Parliament in 1920 -- which the Duke did by sleigh.

Everybody, including the horses, look cold.

Check out the massive fur coats of the sleigh drivers. Standard winter driving apparel in those days!

(Clipped from NFB Archives No. 6097)
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Was this January? ...in which case Robert Borden would have still been in his last few months as PM. This would mean it was the first sitting in the brand new Centre Block, rebuilt after the 1916 fire... Prior to that Parliament sat in temporary quarters in the Victoria Memorial Museum building (now the Museum of Nature -- same place but fewer butterflies back then)...

Does anyone remember the buffalo coats that Mounties used to wear? My dad had one, but he traded it for a ten speed bike in 1969.

Centre Block (circa 1922) open for business but Peace Tower still a work in progress...

Being close to the Ottawa river doesn't help. It's really cold near the river. Thanks for this footage...❄️❄️❄️

Nice coats, silly hat.

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Friday December 21st, 2018
Lost Ottawa

Here's a nifty Lost Ottawa vehicle!

Shared by Rick Paquet, who writes:This is how Dr. Harold Geggie did house calls in 1930 up in Wakefield !
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Heres a nifty Lost Ottawa vehicle!

Shared by Rick Paquet, who writes:

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The vehicle is an Super Snow Bird conversion of a 1929 Ford Model A. They sold hundreds of them. Bombardier's "invention" happened six years later. Snow Birds, which were only two axles in back had been developed in 1921 and used Model T for the conversion. There were also Super Snow Bird Model Bs which came along in 1932 when the Model A was discontinued.

While Bombardier's first effort involved 4 skis on a frame with a rear mounted engine and an aircraft propeller in 1924... like many things "he invented", he just copied others who'd done it already. His first "snowmobile", the B7 was basically half-track like the Snow Bird and Super SnowBird but came 15 years after their original development and marketing. www.youtube.com/watch?v=NExMmSz7n1o

Very important vehicle in its time. My Dad drove one of these to transport food and vital supplies between Ruyon Noranda and the gold mine in Belle-Terre PQ. (1930's) He was the lifeline thruout the long and difficult winter in challenging terrain.. He drove alone !!

Quite likely one of Bombardier’s first snowmobiles......

My father who grew up in Wakefield often talked about Dr. Geggie and this machine. Dr. Geggie apparently also used for a short time a propeller driven snow machine. Would love to see a picture of that too. Thanks for sharing this picture.

Forerunner to the skidoo?

That is so cool!

Bet he was a hero to many!

an early snowmobile?

Great idea!

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Friday December 21st, 2018
Lost Ottawa

Ben Weiss shares one of those dreams we have during an Ottawa Winter ... of summer on the beach at Britannia.

Writes Ben:Generations of us have enjoyed our summers playing and picnicking on the beaches and grounds of the west end's BRITANNIA PARK (seen here circa 1910). Did you know that we have Ottawa's own turn-of-the-century dynamic duo, AHEARN & SOPER to thank?

THOMAS AHEARN & WARREN SOPER thrust Ottawa into the modern era of ELECTRIC STREET CARS when they introduced the city to their state-of-the-art OTTAWA ELECTRIC RAILWAY in 1891.
However, they urgently needed to maximize ridership on this new mode of transportation (both during the week as well as on weekends) so they came up with the idea of providing families with exciting new destinations -- developing grand parks, including BRITANNIA & ROCKCLIFFE, that have brought joy to Ottawans for over a century now.

In addition, these clever innovators formed the OTTAWA LAND ASSOCIATION (partnering with other speculators) to subdivide land and create the first SUBURBS along their street car routes, especially in the west end.
(Their Bank Street street car line inspired the local landowner to subdivide his family farm, launching the GLEBE neighbourhood.)

The enterprising duo didn't stop there. The same year AHEARN & SOPER began the Ottawa Electric Railway they also created a subsidiary, the OTTAWA CAR COMPANY, with its plant at Kent & Slater, converting William Wylie's carriage building operations to build street cars for themselves and for cities right across Canada.
This subsidiary produced over 1600 vehicles (including military vehicles and weapons, ambulances and Howitzer guns during the Boer War and WWI) and was eventually renamed OTTAWA CAR & AIRCRAFT LIMITED in 1937, having outgrown its downtown location and expanded to Bowesville Rd where it's WWII activities directly led to the establishment of the first major airfields at Uplands and Rockcliffe, producing wartime aircraft for Armstrong and Avro and parts such as bomb doors, flaps and elevators for Lancaster bombers.

DID YOU ALSO KNOW?
- It required 10 cents and 30 minutes to ride the street car from downtown to BRITANNIA at the turn of the century.
- Ahearn & Soper's street cars were launched BEFORE TORONTO & MONTREAL had theirs, customized for Ottawa winters with the innovation of special snow-clearing rotating brushes.
- Ahearn & Soper's street cars were the FIRST IN THE WORLD TO BE ELECTRICALLY HEATED, featuring Ahearn's patented invention of an electrically-heated water system.
- In 1878 Thomas Ahearn unknowingly infringed on Alexander Graham Bell's patent by making Ottawa's FIRST LONG DISTANCE PHONE CALL using handmade sets from cigar boxes he constructed after reading an article in Scientific American. Subsequently the recently formed Bell Telephone Company hired Ahearn, at the age of 25, to run their Ottawa operation in 1880.
- Ahearn & Soper installed the PARLIAMENT BUILDINGS' FIRST TELEPHONE SYSTEM in 1882.
- In 1892 Thomas Ahearn invented, patented and demonstrated purportedly the world's FIRST ELECTRIC OVEN, preparing the world's first meal cooked completely by electricity at Ottawa's Windsor Hotel, at the northeast corner of Queen & Metcalfe, and introduced it to the world at Chicago's 1893 World's Fair.
- Ahearn & Soper started up the first of their light & power businesses in 1887, eventually evolving them into the OTTAWA LIGHT, HEAT & POWER COMPANY by 1908, providing decades of private sector competition for Ottawa Hydro.
- In 1899 Ahearn was the FIRST IN OTTAWA TO DRIVE AN AUTOMOBILE (it was electric).
- In 1901 Ahearn & Soper received accolades when they magnificently electrically lit up PARLIAMENT HILL, MAJORS HILL PARK and the ALEXANDRA BRIDGE for the visit of the future KING GEORGE V and QUEEN MARY.
- Ahearn & Soper introduced electric lighting to industries such as lumber mills, dramatically increasing productive time for Ottawa area enterprises.
- Ahearn had close relationships with prime ministers WILFRID LAURIER and MACKENZIE KING, helping with the purchase of LAURIER HOUSE and installing the electrical wiring for King's cottage at KINGSMERE.
- King appointed Ahearn CHAIRMAN of the OTTAWA IMPROVEMENT COMMISSION (predecessor of the NCC) in the 1920s where Ahearn spearheaded improvements to the DRIVEWAY, ISLAND PARK DRIVE, and the building of the CHAMPLAIN BRIDGE.
- King also appointed Ahearn to the PRIVY COUNCIL and the National Advisory Committee on the ST LAWRENCE WATERWAY.
- An avid inventor, Ahearn eventually held over TWO DOZEN CANADIAN AND U.S. PATENTS.
- Ahearn's son, Frank, eventually ran his father's businesses and was FIRST OWNER of the NHL-era Stanley Cup winning OTTAWA SENATORS and, in the 1930s was elected to Parliament.
- Ahearn's daughter, Ethel, married Harry Southam, long-time publisher of the OTTAWA CITIZEN and founding Chancellor of CARLETON COLLEGE (UNIVERSITY) 1952-1954.
- The city purchased the Ottawa Electric Railway in 1948 and it became the OTC, and later OC TRANSPO.
- The LAST OF THE STREET CARS came to a stop in 1959.
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Ben Weiss shares one of those dreams we have during an Ottawa Winter ... of summer on the beach at Britannia.

Writes Ben:

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Would leave with a friend or two, bring a lunch, hop onto the streetcar and spend the day, coming home for supper time. Wonderful memories.. ......C

Thomas Ahearn did not invent the electric oven, and never claimed to have. It is often stated the Ahearn obtained an 1892 patent for "an electric oven." But in that Canadian Patent, 39916, Ahearn claims only to have "invented certain new and useful improvements in electric ovens" - implicitly acknowledging that electric ovens were known devices. Among the improvements patented were electric lighting inside the oven, and a glass window into it. From page 1 of Ahearn's patent 39916 (red underline is mine)

Cigar box phones? The claim that Thomas Ahearn made Ottawa's first long distance telephone call, using equipment of his own construction in 1878, is surely apocryphal. Most biographies of Ahearn do not mention it. Newspapers of the day avidly followed the developments in telephony, but I can find no contemporaneous mention of an Ottawa demonstration by Ahearn. In early February of 1878, the Montreal Telegraph Company demonstrated long distance telephony from its Ottawa office using both Bell equipment and equipment patented by Cyrille Duquet of Quebec City. These demonstrations were reported in the Ottawa Citizen. Ahearn had been employed in Ottawa as a telegraph operator for Montreal Telegraph, and the Bell telephone office Ahearn later managed originally belonged to the Montreal company, but I'm not sure he was with that company in 1878. From the Ottawa Citizen Feb. 1, 1878

Canada Post's 2011 stamp commemorating Ahearn's oven.

My dad worked for Ahearn and Soper from 1933 till they closed down.

So interesting and so many milestones by this Ottawa pair. My grandparents had some of their first dates by riding the streetcar out to Britannia. They married in 1912.

Interesting history of Ottawa!

Went there many times as a kid

This is so interesting,should read it.... πŸ‘πŸ‘πŸ‘

GOOD OLD OTTAWA RIVER......

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Friday December 21st, 2018
Lost Ottawa

Advertisement for Santa's Workshop at Ottawa's Westgate Shopping Centre in December of 1955.

The picture is not too clear, but you get the idea.

The workshop was in a log cabin, placed in the corner of the parking lot near Handy Andy's and ... Kresge's?

(From the Ottawa Citizen)
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Advertisement for Santas Workshop at Ottawas Westgate Shopping Centre in December of 1955. 

The picture is not too clear, but you get the idea. 

The workshop was in a log cabin, placed in the corner of the parking lot near Handy Andys and ... Kresges? 

(From the Ottawa Citizen)

12 CommentsComment on Facebook

When I was a little kid, early 80s, my mom brought me to Westgate and when you went down the escalator there was a little Santa workshop. Kids could go in and get help from elves to pick out Christmas gifts for their parents. They would wrap them for you too. I thought it was the coolest thing.

Going to miss Westgate when it's gone.

Julie VW, Wow, we were just here the other day, exactly behind this spot at Rock n' Johnny's, about 63 years after this was taken!

3,000 kids on Saturday. Whew - Santa must have been pooped at the end of the day.

I remember Handy Andy!

When I came to Ottawa in 1963 I worked at handy Andy .

I live in Toronto and not following the westgate story. What is the latest news on when it is closing?

Befor my time

Katherine Cundell

Ream Ay

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Friday December 21st, 2018
Lost Ottawa

Our friends at the Bytown Museum share an Ottawa outing.

Asks the Bytown:What does your office Christmas party look like? 🀣

The Duke of Connaught and friends - including his wife Princess Louise, and daughter Princess Patricia - at Rockcliffe Cabin in the winter of 1913.

[Bytown Museum, P3143]
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Our friends at the Bytown Museum share an Ottawa outing.

Asks the Bytown:

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Never heard of any of them.

Another great photo of times past.

They look cold

Thursday December 20th, 2018
Lost Ottawa

Christine Stinson shares a photo of herself at Ottawa favourite department store -- Freiman's!

Says Christine:This photo was taken of me by my Mom at Freiman’s Department Store December 1957 on Rideau Street Ottawa. They always had a Magical Christmas display in their windows. Santa spoke to you through the Microphone He moved his arms.
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Christine Stinson shares a photo of herself at Ottawa favourite department store -- Freimans!

Says Christine:

13 CommentsComment on Facebook

Murphy Gamble's on Sparks put on a very nice one too.

I remember the train you could ride in that went around the toy department.

Loved the malt shop in the basement and the windows

The windows were just beautiful - great memories -

Freimans sounds like Woodward's of the east.

My mother worked there in basement dresses for several years then the Bay bought..it ..I remember the malt shop 15 cents for a malt served in a glass..fantastic!!

LOVED TO SEE FRIEMANS WINDOW WHEN I WAS YOUNG....

I worked the toy dept one Christmas there and played my favorite song over and over again Rockin Around The Christmas Tree (Brenda Lee) Had so much fun with all the kids checking out the toys etc. Worked in the office too and remember the cannisters with $ and paperwork went in the air shoot to the main office . Loved it as when I was around 18 or so found this to be one of my favorite places to work.

Ah... the dress jammed down into the snow pants days... πŸ™‚

awwww any more pics of these displays?

They were always magical!

Loved, Loved those windows

Eaton’s also had wonderful displays.

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Thursday December 20th, 2018
Lost Ottawa

Folks walks through the winter desolation of Confederation Square circa 1959-60, when it functioned as a traffic circle.

Way over on the right there's someone in denial about about Ottawa winters, still driving their British sports car.

The Chateau really needed a cleaning in those days after so many years of locomotives going by ...

(LAC e999906018-u.jpg)
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Folks walks through the winter desolation of Confederation Square circa 1959-60, when it functioned as a traffic circle.

Way over on the right theres someone in denial about about Ottawa winters, still driving their British sports car.

The Chateau really needed a cleaning in those days after so many years of locomotives going by ...

(LAC e999906018-u.jpg)

19 CommentsComment on Facebook

Wood and coal burning caused a lot of the black deposits on the buildings. I watched the replacement of several stones in the parliament hill fence wall in the 70's - the last steps included a black stain to make the very light stone match

If you look at the bus and follow its intended path you’ll see it’s going to go clockwise around the square, against the flow of a traffic circle ... Confusion!

Thankfully it's not with today's drivers...that would be a car wreck roundabout!

Driving a sports car like that in winter is automotive abuse. (Whimper).

Good picture of confusion square. It was the coldest place to wait for a bus.

Hey Julie Rankin this is when the train station was at the Lebreton flats and the Queen came to Ottawa. She's in the horse buggy.

AKA Confusion square

Ah, well, if peope can ride bicycles through the whole winter, driving a topless British import isn't a far flung idea.

So desolate and pedestrian-unfriendly!

Interesting to see a bus at the former streetcar stop, heading the wrong way around the square. :O

Looks like a bug eyed Austin Healy Sprite ( the sports car). Stewart

From left to right I see a 56 Buick, a 58 Ford and a 59 Oldsmobile.

I remember there was a lot of talk of sandblasting building back in the 60s. I am sure that was the result of all the black soot staining from burning coal and the steam trains. I remember going through old files just around the corner on Queen Street and my hands were black within a minute. Everything was covered with black soot.

There are no traffic lights!

On reflection, think what I thought was a headlight, is probably a wing mirror. TR3, or MGA more likely than Sprite. Stewart

Sorry the picture is posting, I hope it goes thru

Julie VW

Ben Di Labio

Natasha Dupuis guess where

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Thursday December 20th, 2018
Lost Ottawa

We had some Ottawa hockey players drinking their milk the other day. Here's what looks like the cap to a jug from Ottawa's Plante Dairy ... well RR #4 Ottawa anyway.

Love the phone number! TA for Talbot? Taylor?

Shared by Glen Conway.
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We had some Ottawa hockey players drinking their milk the other day. Heres what looks like the cap to a jug from Ottawas Plante Dairy ... well RR #4 Ottawa anyway.

Love the phone number! TA for Talbot? Taylor?

Shared by Glen Conway.

30 CommentsComment on Facebook

In 1941, Plante's Dairy ads gave the location as Billings Bridge. Talbot 2, introduced ca. 1960, was listed as being associated with the Metcalfe Highway (31) which would go along with the Billings Bridge description. From the Journal, Mar. 10, 1941

Today, the 613-822-0337 number points to the Anderson Links golf course in Carlsbad Springs. Might the Plante Dairy have been on that property?

Grew up in Alta Vista - our phone number started with RE-3 - no idea what the RE stood for, but it eventually became 733.

I just remember when we started to have to dial 7 digits.... Thanks goodness for redial and auto dialing; who even knows others' numbers nowadays?

Very interesting. I seem to recall that the exchange 23 (CE) stood for "Central" and 22 (CA) stood for "Capital" and 72 (PA) stood for "Parkway" but I don't ever remember hearing what 82 was short for. Anyone know how the use of "Talbot" might have come about...?

My phone number was Ta 2-2137. Ta was Talbot we were rr # 4 also

The Campeau homes developed in the mid-1970’s along Plante Dr, Avocado, Bourbon st, Condor Ave and others in the area all sit on what was once the Plante Farm.

I do not recall Plante dairy, but i recall TAlbot as a phone area covering Carlsbad Springs and other outlying areas. We lived in a SHerwood phone area.

The phone # was 822 0237, located on Bank St in Ottawa

Pretty cool reading all of this. This was my family's farm.

Here is the aerial shot of Plante Dairy

The Plante Dairy was located at 2341 Bank Street, Rural Route 4, in the city’s south end. The dairy made home deliveries and, in the early years following World War II,processed milk for other producers. Their farm was located on the east side of Bank Street in an area now occupied by the South Keys Plaza, just north of Hunt Club Road. www.bankofcanadamuseum.ca/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/ottawa-dairy-tokens.pdf

Talbot 5-1669 was my number (Pineglen area)

We had a Talbot8 phone number - in the west end, off Richmond just west of crossing Carling Ave.,

I do remember RR#4 which was our area in Carleton Heights...but it might have been RR#3 ??? Phone started I think with PA.I USE TO BE HOW OLD?

TA was the exchange we had as well

I was in the Talbot 2 exchange just before 1960 out on Hawthorne Road RR4.

I think the TA referred to the numbers 82... We lived in the PA (i.e. 72...) area of Ottawa.

The entrance to the Plante Dairy was right where the main entrance to South Keys Shopping Centre is today. There was a fairly large sign at the entrance. The farm buildings were well west of Bank Street, more or less where Plante Drive is today. Plante Drive honours the family.

SH for Sherwood, CE for central

RE stood for Regent

CE for central was ours

TA2-0162, Blossom Park.

TA was the exchange 82.

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Wednesday December 19th, 2018
Lost Ottawa

Ottawa kids peer into the store windows at what I'm thinking is a Freiman's Department Store, December 13, 1955.

Santa looks like he's too busy playing with the train set to pay attention to no kids!

(City of Ottawa Archives CA035873)
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Ottawa kids peer into the store windows at what Im thinking is a Freimans Department Store, December 13, 1955.

Santa looks like hes too busy playing with the train set to pay attention to no kids!

(City of Ottawa Archives CA035873)

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Felt sad when they stopped doing this. Loved our Christmas visit to AJ Freiman Window, Santa, Elevator Operator with white gloves, to the basement for a Malted Milk in a great glass ❀ wonderful memories. Thank you for sharing this pic! πŸŽ„πŸŽ„πŸŽ„

Frieman’s always had the best Christmas windows ! Going downtown to see the Christmas windows was a big event when I was a kid !

If I am not mistaken that looks like a Lionel Train set. I still have my dads from the 1940's. I still have a lot of track, too.

Those three rail train sets were very popular when I was a kid. Loved playing with mine.

My Mom worked there before she got married. I don't think she took us there. Darn.

What a treat it was to see the Christmas window display and go for a malted milk. Later got a job there in the toy department and moved on to the credit dept. till 1966.

Gosh I don't think its at Freiman's - They were usually set up on the 4th floor - besides, if you look out the window , there seems to be a walk up ramp which did not exist at Freiman's - Could be wrong

Nice! My Dad worked at Freeman’s he was a shoe salesman for a bit and the year was 1955, so cool πŸ˜ŠπŸ‘πŸ˜

Brings back wonderful memories.

I loved A.J. Frieman's window displays....

The best malted milk I have ever tasted . I miss Frieman"s department store .

Late fifties I drove the train on the fourth floor

Remember those displays at Freimans as well as the huge revolving door at the front of the store. Rideau street at Christmas almost looked like scenes of main street of movie "I'ts a Wonderful Life" sure miss it.

My Mom also worked there.

We would drive from our short stay in Smiths Falls and Renfrew to view Freimans store window and it was an exciting day! The window was amazing and they also had a train ride upstairs in the toy department that was magical.

Was it friemans that had the malted milk drinks on the lower floor??

Not to mention the malted milk downstairs. What great memories!

All the stores on Rideau St (Larocques, Ogilvies, Caplans and Friemans) had beautiful Christmas windows. It was a great competition and a real adventure as a child to stand and dream at each window!

Love the face on the little girl !

Wow, Donna MacMillan! I wasn’t even born when this picture was taken!

Not only the best widows but also a floor of winter wonderland!

Gerry Merkel

Zoe Thrumston

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Wednesday December 19th, 2018
Lost Ottawa

You never know what you'll find ... and in some cases you might be able fill out your own certificate for the Great Ottawa Snow of 1970-71!

Shared by Mark Rehder:Came across this in a stack of unused paper I’d found in a desk in my new place. Looks like the previous tenant just filed it away and it has sat ever since.
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You never know what youll find ... and in some cases you might be able fill out your own certificate for the Great Ottawa Snow of 1970-71!

Shared by Mark Rehder:

76 CommentsComment on Facebook

Our driveway that winter. I was the only kid still at home so guess who did most of the shovelling.

Climbed from the snow bank onto the roof at one point.

Me and two of my brothers went out and dug a deep hole in a very tall snowbank we then laid a few sheets across the top of the hole and sprinkled a little snow on top to hide the hole and the reason we did this was because a few of the children from St Laurent School ( which was later getting out of school than we were ) always walked on top of the snowbanks on their way home and so...it didn’t take long for one of them ( a young boy with a back pack ) came walking towards our booby trap and next thing you know he disappears into the abyss, poor kid couldn’t get out on his own and we ended up having to help him out.

I remember trying to park a VW bus near the Civic Hospital -- in a snowbank!

That was the year my Mom broke her knee skating on the Rideau Canal. She went to work every day in her full leg cast and crutches!

Should have got one, too. Shovelled snow from our backyard at end of April and 9 months pregnant!

I remember getting 5 different days off of school for 16 inches or more of snow EACH!!

Being a small kid, I loved the snow forts we made with that snow back then. I also remember some people scared another ice age was coming.

I was here that winter at Carleton--mighty amazing how it kept coming and coming

Never got the certificate, but am proud of myself for surviving that winter. Especially since I had to be dug out every morning and make it to work very early at Gloucester High School because Colonel By Secondary used the school in the afternoons. Have photos of my kids standing in the front yard, leaving their elbows on the roof of our new house in Orleans.

I remember my mother getting all of us these certificates, I have no idea where mind is, but I remember the snow was so high that you could look in the kitchen windows standing on the snow.

I will never forget that year. My little btother was hit by a car at the end of our driveway on Vanson ave. Jan 22,71 The snowbanks were so high that the person turning in to the neighbour across the street was hugging our side of the road .

I have one, somewhere in my memorabilia...

I remember it well and did get my certificate.

I have one of these put away somewhere. My mom got it for us.

Still the record... www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa/ottawa-snowiest-winters-1.3985204 "The snowiest winter on record at the Ottawa airport weather station is 1970-71, when 444.6 cm fell. The last time the city almost broke the record was 2007-08, when 432.7 cm fell."

I remembr that year so well. Our daughter was born on March 13! Never did get the certificate - too busy!

Well do I remember that year.

After clearing the snow off the roof several times our dog could get on the house and be found sitting there surveying the street.

I remember going to work , sidewalks not cleared, very hard to reach the stop. they even called a halt to traffic in center town due to the amount of snow.

We lived on Aylmer Ave. My dad made stairs in the snowbank to the garage roof in the back yard. We would slide off the roof into the snow. There was nowhere to throw the snow in the front yard. It was like a tunnel walking down the front walkway. What a crazy winter that was!

Yes, we got one too. We were living on Seguin Street in Gatineau. The snow banks were so high, we could not see the bedroom windows....wow

I shoveled all of that! We didn't have a snowblower, so guess who had to keep the driveway clear? I think it was the following year we hired someone to plow the driveway.

I have one of these. The snow was so high that I could walk off the bank on to the roof. Inches not centimetres!

I remember watching my brother out front with a broom handle trying to find the car.

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