Lost Ottawa Facebook 2017

Here are all the Lost Ottawa posts that appeared on Facebook in 2017, starting with the most recent and going backwards.

You can view the posts in various ways. You can read the descriptions on this page and see the initial comments. You can click on the three dots at the bottom of a post to see more comments. You can click on the picture to see a “full screen” version of the picture with comments. You can view the original post on Facebook and leave more comments there.

At the bottom of the page there is a “Get More Posts” link that will load additional posts to the page. We are still working on a way to make the posts searchable.

Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons
Saturday December 30th, 2017

Lost Ottawa Home Edition, featuring the halfway house on the way to Pointe Gatineau, which would put this house ... right in the middle of the Ottawa River! Brrrr!

For many years, however, there was an ice road across the river. Mostly used to bring firewood to the big city from what I can tell.

You can see the "coast" of Pointe Gatineau to the left.

(LAC CA002188)
... See MoreSee Less

Lost Ottawa Home Edition, featuring the halfway house on the way to Pointe Gatineau, which would put this house ... right in the middle of the Ottawa River! Brrrr!

For many years, however, there was an ice road across the river. Mostly used to bring firewood to the big city from what I can tell.

You can see the coast of Pointe Gatineau to the left.

(LAC CA002188)

7 CommentsComment on Facebook

Yes - the building in front of the horses is the Passport Office 😏

are there still any spots (in that area) where the river freezes right across?

Are those beautiful horses Canadians?

View more comments

Saturday December 30th, 2017

Linda Seccaspina shares a story about what was once Ottawa's most popular hotel -- the Russell.

Writes Linda:The Russell House hotel was the most high-profile hotel in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada for many decades. It was located at the corner of Sparks Street and Elgin Street, where Confederation Square is located today. The original building was built in the 1840s. Additions were made in the 1870s and the original building replaced in 1880.

In 1901 there was a smallpox outbreak in Ottawa. Complaints were made on a daily basis to the Ottawa Journal of anyone that a local citizen deemed should be quarantined. Names and addresses were published in the newspaper, no matter the age of those who were inflicted. Vaccines were available at the Ottawa City Hall and doctors were kept busy.

In 1912, the Château Laurier succeeded the Russell as Ottawa's premier hotel. Money was spent on renovations in the 1920s, but the hotel had declined due to age and its closure was announced on September 1, 1925. Some of the reasons listed were the high cost of heating the structure, and the higher number of staff to operate the hotel, compared to a newer facility.The Russell House closed permanently on October 1, 1925. Ground-level shops remained open, but the hotel was emptied.

On April 14, 1928, a fire broke out in the hotel, and the hotel was mostly destroyed. The remains of the structure were demolished by November. The Government of Canada had been in the process of buying the property when the fire occurred, and the government used the land to expand Elgin Street to create Confederation Square. Various artifacts of the hotel are on display at the Bytown Museum.
... See MoreSee Less

Linda Seccaspina shares a story about what was once Ottawas most popular hotel -- the Russell.

Writes Linda:

6 CommentsComment on Facebook

I wonder if any other Ottawa hotel, here in 2017, can claim that all their employees are vaccinated...

My husband’s grandfather was a chef at the Russell Hotel until his untimely death in 1926

Thank GAWD it burned down. Made room for the wonderful War Memorial Plaza.

View more comments

Friday December 29th, 2017

Terry Fraser shares a photo of another famous Ottawa department store -- Charles Ogilvy's on the northeast corner of Rideau and Nicholas.

Done up for Christmas in 1974. My Scottish Mom loved this place.Charles Ogilvy on Rideau St. about 1974.
... See MoreSee Less

Terry Fraser shares a photo of another famous Ottawa department store -- Charles Ogilvys on the northeast corner of Rideau and Nicholas.

Done up for Christmas in 1974. My Scottish Mom loved this place.

53 CommentsComment on Facebook

We gave my 101 year old Mother-In-Law your book for Christmas and she loved it. She had a story to add to many of the pictures/stories in the book. She was raised on a farm south of Ottawa but went to work as a housemaid/childcare-worker/cook while still a teenager for just a few dollars a week, half of which was sent home to help the family and pay the property taxes. Her Christmas basket was filled with many things but the book "Lost Ottawa" was the hit. Thank You.

I love the things I see on this site! Ottawa used to be such a wonderful place and I love getting to see all the photos you post.

I worked there during Christmas season 1983 and into 1984. Loved Ogilvys!!! Ann Dashper and a group of lovely folks there were the mainstay of Ogilvys till they closed down. Fond memories of that place!

View more comments

Friday December 29th, 2017

Terry Fraser shares a Christmas photo of Caplan's, one of Ottawa's famous home-grown department stores. Taken from Nicholas Street (when this block of Nicholas was still a street).

The Caplan's store on Rideau opened in 1916 and closed in 1984, shortly after the opening of the Rideau Centre.

Notes Terry:Caplan's on Rideau St. about 1974.
... See MoreSee Less

Terry Fraser shares a Christmas photo of Caplans, one of Ottawas famous home-grown department stores. Taken from Nicholas Street (when this block of Nicholas was still a street). 

The Caplans store on Rideau opened in 1916 and closed in 1984, shortly after the opening of the Rideau Centre.

Notes Terry:

33 CommentsComment on Facebook

Magical Christmas window displays at Caplan's and Freiman's....lots of little nose prints on the windows.

one of the best memories I had as a child in the 50's was going downtown and seeing all the wonderful christmas windo displays in the major department stores. Animated, action and different every year. As a kid it felt magical!!

Remember Caplans well, there were so many great stores on Sparks and Rideau Streets in the 1970s and 80s with lots of people strolling and shopping on Thursday and Fridays nights. Both streets were busy and safe until the Rideau Centre was opened and more unsavoury types started hanging around on Rideau Street, sad really.

View more comments

Thursday December 28th, 2017

Dining Out in Lost Ottawa, shared by Sheldon Leonard.

Writes Sheldon:As seen while enjoying a smoked meat on rye and pickle before going across the street to catch a matinee at the Nelson!
... See MoreSee Less

Dining Out in Lost Ottawa, shared by Sheldon Leonard.

Writes Sheldon:

43 CommentsComment on Facebook

Our family ate there a fair bit in the sixties. My parents loved their steaks, and they tolerated my little brother's antics. This was before they expanded to the back room. Does anyone remember Nancy, one of the hardest working waitresses?

This poster, or a repro of it, was at Nate's when they were on Merivale for awhile in the old Red Barn. They moved back downtown a year or two ago.

I used to Love having a jumbo with Swiss and a cold draught beer right where that sign hung!! Thanks for that great memory. I wonder who has that sign?? Freda?

View more comments

Thursday December 28th, 2017

Michael Perron shares some Ottawa artwork, along with an Ottawa sports story.

Writes Michael (who used to work for Kaufman Signs):

"After the Harry Koffman story last week, I thought about Marc Robert, one of my co-workers at Koffman Signs.

Marc entered a contest to design the new Ottawa Lynx logo -- and he won! The final logo was altered a bit at the end to make the Lynx look different. But most of the original work is his."
... See MoreSee Less

Michael Perron shares some Ottawa artwork, along with an Ottawa sports story.

Writes Michael (who used to work for Kaufman Signs): 

After the Harry Koffman story last week, I thought about Marc Robert, one of my co-workers at Koffman Signs.

Marc entered a contest to design the new Ottawa Lynx logo -- and he won! The final logo was altered a bit at the end to make the Lynx look different. But most of the original work is his.

21 CommentsComment on Facebook

Still remember when they played their first game. I was a kid. I lived about a kilometre from there and I could hear them sing the anthems. I was like "Cool, we have a baseball team now!".... and never made it to one game. oops... lol

I worked in concession stands at the stadium. Saw a few games during the years. Good baseball memories.

Went to a bunch of the games in the first couple of seasons. Saw some great players that eventually played for the Expos!

View more comments

Thursday December 28th, 2017

Ry Crawford shares a second picture of the Ottawa Civic Centre in 1967.

Says Ry:
... See MoreSee Less

5 CommentsComment on Facebook

One if the funniest incidents occurred early during an exhibition games between Toronto Maple Leads and the Montreal Canadiens. JOHN Ferguson and Eddie Shack were on the ice when the organist noticed. Within seconds Shack and Fergie started fighting. The organist waited for a bear hug between the two and started playing "Please Release Me Let Me Go. As if on wife Shack grabbed Ferguson and planted a huge wet Kiss on him. Fergie went crazy while Shack skated around the ice waving his arms. I was working security by the benches that game and happened directly in front of me.

As I understand it..there was to be a restaurant on the upper south side where that wall is. The deal obviously either fell through or was one of the many cuts to bring project into budget.

Was always a great place for a concert as the stage was on the squatty long side, rather than one of the short ends like most arenas so the seats had better sight-lines.

View more comments

Thursday December 28th, 2017

Ry Crawford shares the first of two pictures of the Ottawa Civic Centre.

Writes Ry:
... See MoreSee Less

14 CommentsComment on Facebook

First game at the new Civic Centre , with future NHLers, Bunny laroque, Bill Clement, Pierre Jarry, Pete Laframboise, Pierre Bouchard, Rejean Houle, Guy Lapointe, Marc Tardif, Murry Wilson, Gilbert Perreault, J.P. Bordeleau, Larry Pleau....wow all in a Junior game together.

So many concerts...

It looked a lot like this when I went to Ottawa 67s games back in the 1979 to about 1982 timeframe. Brad Marsh salvaged the old original scoreboard that was used at the Civic Centre during those years and had it in his "Marshy's" establishment at the Palladium (later the Corel Centre/Scotiabank Place/Canadian Tire Centre, lol). Believe a local farmer had it on his property for that number of years.

View more comments

Thursday December 28th, 2017

Ottawa ... Winter Wonderland in Major's Hill Park, shared by Paul Couvrette.

Says Paul:

"Christmas Portrait, 1894. Restored by moi. (Hey ... My daughter gifted me your book...small world)
... See MoreSee Less

Ottawa ... Winter Wonderland in Majors Hill Park, shared by Paul Couvrette.

Says Paul: 

Christmas Portrait, 1894. Restored by moi. (Hey ... My daughter gifted me your book...small world)

11 CommentsComment on Facebook

I got your cool book too. I'm thinking this is taken from major's hill, roughly where the back end of the chateau Laurier would eventually be built?

I love the period clothes. Look very elegant, glad we do not have to wear dresses in the winter anymore. Bad for the knees on day like today, I am sure!

Beautiful picture!! I bought a copy of the book for my brother in law and received one from my son! See? What goes around comes around!

View more comments

Wednesday December 27th, 2017

Billy Boone shares this awesome photo of the opening of Ottawa's Carlingwood Mall.

Writes Billy:Carlingwood opened in 1957 and offered 40 stores and was at the time the largest shopping centres in Ottawa. One of the selling points of the mall was its extensive 24 acres (97,000 m2) of free parking. Besides, Sears, one of the early stores to move into the mall was the established shoe store Armstrong & Richardson. Armstrong & Richardson is still in operation in Carlingwood.[
... See MoreSee Less

Billy Boone shares this awesome photo of the opening of Ottawas Carlingwood Mall.

Writes Billy:

47 CommentsComment on Facebook

One of my friends found a color picture of the original shopping center, complete with Simpsons-Sears and the original Loblaws. Here you go !

Wow, thats a blast from the past. I remember that mall before they close it in. They enlarged it 4 different times that I remember. Back in the 70's I worked at Tamblyns Drug Mart right near that restaurant.

I was real little in the 70s but used to go to Carlingwood often. My mom and older sister used to go to a woman's clothing store. It was down stairs somewhere and there were gold lights and mirrors everywhere. Very disco. Does anyone remember it and remember what store and where it was?

View more comments

Wednesday December 27th, 2017

Shopping in Lost Ottawa, featuring the Freiman's store in the St. Laurent Shopping Mall in 1969.

Good place for "Boxing Day" sales back then ... but I am trying to remember whether stores were actually allowed to be open on Boxing Day at the time?

I don't remember anything like the current frenzy ...

(LAC Mikan 3343393)
... See MoreSee Less

Shopping in Lost Ottawa, featuring the Freimans store in the St. Laurent Shopping Mall in 1969.

Good place for Boxing Day sales back then ... but I am trying to remember whether stores were actually allowed to be open on Boxing Day at the time? 

I dont remember anything like the current frenzy ...

(LAC Mikan 3343393)

47 CommentsComment on Facebook

Actually the St. Laurent Mall opened in 1968 the following year I won a trip to Barbadoes . The Mall had a contest and 55 couples won that trip we all went to Barbadoes together what a trip that was all expenses paid .It was sponsored by the Barbadoes tourism / We got a real welcome Pierre Trudeau was Prime Minister at that time and he sent them a Thank you Letter for this Canadian trip and Welcome .We were received at the Barbadoes Minister home for a tour Best holiday ever .

Rideau Centre was the first mall to open on December 26th (Boxing Day) in 1992 when the property obtained an exemption under the Retail Business Holiday’s Act as a Tourist Area. Many years later, the province removed December 26th from its list of statutory holidays requiring stores to remain closed.

There were still after-Christmas sales, possibly called "Boxing Day" sales, although they started on the 27th. They definitely were not the frenzy they are today. Mostly people bought leftover Christmas stuff for next year.

View more comments

Wednesday December 27th, 2017

Now that Xmas in Ottawa is done, there's nothing left to do but get the table cloth ready for next year ... so time to visit the Hintonburg Hand Laundry at 1017 Wellington?

Shown here on a snowy winter day in December of 1955.

The picture was part of a story about Chinese Laundries in the the Ottawa Citizen, but our pals at the Kitchissippi Museum have a story, too:

kitchissippimuseum.blogspot.ca/2016/01/the-chinese-laundry-long-lost.html

(City of Ottawa CA036115)
... See MoreSee Less

Now that Xmas in Ottawa is done, theres nothing left to do but get the table cloth ready for next year ... so time to visit the Hintonburg Hand Laundry at 1017 Wellington?

Shown here on a snowy winter day in December of 1955. 

The picture was part of a story about Chinese Laundries in the the Ottawa Citizen, but our pals at the Kitchissippi Museum have a story, too:

http://kitchissippimuseum.blogspot.ca/2016/01/the-chinese-laundry-long-lost.html

(City of Ottawa CA036115)

17 CommentsComment on Facebook

This laundry always did a super job on the nurse's caps for the civic hospital nursing students. They had to be stiff as a board and then folded just so.

This is now the "Third" restaurant which recently opened. They have a photo of the Hintonburgh Laundry on their wall.

The year I was born! What struck me most about the photo are the boots on the woman. My mom had some just like that. Long coats and short boots.

View more comments

Tuesday December 26th, 2017

Night out in Lost Ottawa, featuring a history of Club Zinc in Hull shared by Stephen Mooney.

Clicking the pic will take you to a playlist of industrial music played at Club Zinc from 1992. Clicking the link will take you to a typical song (by PiL) played at Club Zinc five years earlier.

Now for Stephen:

"Back in 1987 when the world was still fun, I used to go clubbing at Club Zinc in Hull. It was not so much a club as a cult: small, dark and seriously cool, it was the place to chill after midnight.

How I remember the glorious haze of cigarette smoke twisting in the laser spotlights that pointed directly at the crystal glass ashtrays on each and every table. It turned the ashtrays into bright lanterns, which was magical in the dimly lighted seating area next to the dance floor. Everything was painted black except for the bar's zinc countertop.

The rules of the club were simple: be yourself and don't mess with other people. Girls could come alone and hang out without being hit on. Guys could come alone and dance by themselves without embarrassment. No one got stupidly drunk. The mood was mildly subversive, attracting low-key goths, loners and small groups of friends. There was never any trouble (for that, one went to the Chaud, which I also enjoyed).

New Years Eve 1987 was a special treat. The club was at its zenith (before the letterman boys started showing up) and the mood was cozy and electric. PIL had just released Happy, which got a lot of airplay that night.

Club Zinc was iconic - a true landmark in the subterranean culture of Ottawa 30 years ago. It ranked with clubs in London and Berlin and is a stark reminder of what has been lost - not only in Ottawa, but the world at large."

www.youtube.com/watch?v=HzT5sBg79XQ

Club Zinc, by Phÿcus
11 track album
... See MoreSee Less

16 CommentsComment on Facebook

I was a card-carrying member at Club Zinc from Dec 1984 when they opened, straight through till they started catering to the college kids. But boy oh boy, the five or so years that we had before that happened, created a ton of memories that I still look back on very fondly. Especially fun when I was allowed to hang out in the DJ booth, with Michel L (RIP) or Nadine (RIP), and pick EPs for them to play. Saw so many bands there too. Either they played there, or they showed up there after their own concert. I.e.: The Cult. 🙂 So much fun- so many great staff there, some lasted longer than others! Ahem! Michel Parent . We'd go on Thursdays, Friday and Saturdays. Sundays we'd jump between Bistro, Le Club and Zinc, and Tuesdays we'd dance ourselves silly at Bistro. Amazing how I ever got any sleep at all.

By the early nineties, the only places to go for alternative and punk music were gigs at Oliver’s at Carleton and SAW Gallery (which had all ages shows, thankfully for me being a young teen back then). I saw Black Triangle and Heavendog. Their drummer, Ted Wilson, wine to school with me. I was friends with his brother. Ted was on You Can’t Do That on Television and now he’s a host on Inner Space on the Space Network...with another guy I know!

I was lucky enough to get to go there before it turned into The Manhattan Project (or Club Manhattan) and then Le Campus, which were also fun places to go in the early 90s. Some memories!

View more comments

Tuesday December 26th, 2017

Boxing Day at the movies, as we take the Elgin Line streetcar all the way from Ottawa East to Sparks Street in 1933.

The Elgin Line was opened to Catherine Street in 1891, and extended to Main Street and Clegg in 1925, but The entire line was abandoned in 1939 with the transformation of Elgin Street into a ceremonial approach to the War Memorial.

THanks to UofO Archives for the use of these air photos.
... See MoreSee Less

1 CommentComment on Facebook

Interesting to see a landscaped park on the east side of Elgin at Somerset (?).

Tuesday December 26th, 2017

Classic Ottawa scene here as Little League Hockey got started for another season on January 14 of 1956.

Referree Garry Hamilton watches the play, while coach Bob Labelle yells at his players. Plus ça change?

The game featured the boys from the St. Joseph's and St. Patrick's orphans homes at what is called "Tech Rink." Would that be Ottawa Tech?

(City of Ottawa Archives CA036328. Game ended in a 2-2 draw)
... See MoreSee Less

Classic Ottawa scene here as Little League Hockey got started for another season on January 14 of 1956. 

Referree Garry Hamilton watches the play, while coach Bob Labelle yells at his players. Plus ça change?

The game featured the boys from the St. Josephs and St. Patricks orphans homes at what is called Tech Rink. Would that be Ottawa Tech?

(City of Ottawa Archives CA036328. Game ended in a 2-2 draw)

21 CommentsComment on Facebook

My grandfather, Wendell (Bill) Addy was a founder of the Cradle Hockey League in Ottawa. It was started with St. Joseph’s Orphanage. He and Ev Tremblay, A’s well as my father, Bob Mitchell, were instrumental in bringing minor hockey to Ottawa. Robert Campeau was the main financial sponsor.

It is the Tech High School rink which was located across the street from the school. It was basically on the southwest corner of Slater and Bronson or very close to it. I played on it.

grew up at slater and lyon beside googan's IGA,,who remembers bowl-rite bowling alley where i was a pin boy

View more comments

Tuesday December 26th, 2017

Where Ottawa Xmas trees went to die in January of 1956.

Thousands and thousands of real trees created a big problem for the city -- what to do with them when they were thrown out?

The answer was a huge bonfire, usually at the city dump out Main street in East Ottawa. Quite a sight when they were set on fire.

(City of Ottawa Archives CA036264-W-Edit)
... See MoreSee Less

Where Ottawa Xmas trees went to die in January of 1956.

Thousands and thousands of real trees created a big problem for the city -- what to do with them when they were thrown out?

The answer was a huge bonfire, usually at the city dump out Main street in East Ottawa. Quite a sight when they were set on fire. 

(City of Ottawa Archives CA036264-W-Edit)

22 CommentsComment on Facebook

In January 1959, Mayor George Nelms was actually burned a bit in the face and eyebrows during this annual Christmas tree burning. He and the fire chief Maynard Dolman were engulfed in flames when they set the torch to the 50,000+ trees.

Suggestion, there is a wildlife farm in Dunrobin that accepts real trees that they feed to the animals: deer, goats and such.

Good point. That would be a major problem trying to get rid of all of the dead trees. I wonder in fact what the usage now would be of real trees in comparison to artificial tree usage in the Ottawa, and surrounding areas. Do you know?

View more comments

Tuesday December 26th, 2017

Went looking for some Christmas music yesterday ... and found this old book from Domenic's Academy of Music.

They used to have several stores around Ottawa - and there's still one left in Orleans.

Those of you who take a close look will see that this is for organ -- and, yes, my pops used to play them on the organ and drive us crazy!
... See MoreSee Less

Went looking for some Christmas music yesterday ... and found this old book from Domenics Academy of Music. 

They used to have several stores around Ottawa - and theres still one left in Orleans.

Those of you who take a close look will see that this is for organ -- and, yes, my pops used to play them on the organ and drive us crazy!

6 CommentsComment on Facebook

Domenic Cinanni, I used to teach accordion at the Bank St. store (near First Ave) also went to Carling Ave (near Broadview) beside a donut shop in strip mall, haven't picked up an accordion in like 25 years now, if anyone knows of the Cinanni''s Anselmo and Margaret were siblings I think, let me know.

I got my first guitar and took lessons at the Domenic's that used to be on Bank Street just north of Alta Vista. That store was owned by John Ricci, the guitarist from the heavy metal band Exciter.

I used to teach guitar at Domenics.

View more comments

Monday December 25th, 2017

Merry Christmas from the Green Valley Restaurant, featuring its famous Xmas tree -- an Ottawa landmark!

Originally shared in 2015 by John Myers, whose family owned the Green Valley into the mid-90s, when it was sold.

Alas, the restaurant burned down on New Years's Eve of 2003.
... See MoreSee Less

Merry Christmas from the Green Valley Restaurant, featuring its famous Xmas tree -- an Ottawa landmark!

Originally shared in 2015 by John Myers, whose family owned the Green Valley into the mid-90s, when it was sold.

Alas, the restaurant burned down on New Yearss Eve of 2003.

105 CommentsComment on Facebook

My mother was a waitress there late 50’s to mid 60’s. When we went to pick her up we would go in the back door and had a mickey mouse ice cream.

I used to go to this restaurant with my parents for special occasions. When my husband and I got married, we came here with our guests after the ceremony. I have wonderful memories of the Green Valley.

A part of our family tradition was dining there on special days after attending church. I remember the Micky Mouse ice cream fondly.

View more comments

Monday December 25th, 2017

Some pictures are universal ... like this one of my older siblings on first seeing the tree (and the presents thereunder) in 1956.

I was not holding the camera. I was one year old.
... See MoreSee Less

Some pictures are universal ... like this one of my older siblings on first seeing the tree (and the presents thereunder) in 1956. 

I was not holding the camera. I was one year old.

2 CommentsComment on Facebook

And what were those three looking at? Well ... this tree, those presents, and Santa's means of ingress.

Precious. Christmas is so exciting for children and those memories we carry with us last a lifetime.

Monday December 25th, 2017

Your Christmas Commute ... in an Ottawa Electric Railway streetcar with Santa for a driver, and an Elf, Rudolf and a chimney on top!

This decorated streetcar, from a souvenir photo in the collection of the Bytown Museum, was apparently in the Ottawa Christmas Parade for 1896.

Hope Santa brings you something special today!

(Bytown Museum, P1737, but I cropped and cleaned it up.)
... See MoreSee Less

Your Christmas Commute ... in an Ottawa Electric Railway streetcar with Santa for a driver, and an Elf, Rudolf and a chimney on top! 

This decorated streetcar, from a souvenir photo in the collection of the Bytown Museum, was apparently in the Ottawa Christmas Parade for 1896.

Hope Santa brings you something special today!

(Bytown Museum,  P1737, but I cropped and cleaned it up.)

12 CommentsComment on Facebook

Doh! Fixed now!

Oops! Lost Ottawa...looks like the streetcar got lost.😉

Must be that Elf on the Shelf... He hid the picture 🎄

View more comments

Monday December 25th, 2017

Here's a little Ottawa Xmas memory for you.

Not only do we have carollers in the snow. Stamps for Christmas Cards cost only 3 cents!
... See MoreSee Less

Heres a little Ottawa Xmas memory for you. 

Not only do we have carollers in the snow. Stamps for Christmas Cards cost only 3 cents!

9 CommentsComment on Facebook

I remember that when we mailed Christmas Cards, they needed 2 cents worth of stamps if the envelopes were unsealed, but 3 cents worth if the envelopes were sealed. And we had mail delivery to our home twice a day during the Christmas season. Back then people sent and received many cards.

My Christmas card to BC cost me $1.80 this year 🙂

Back in 'my day', first class mail (sealed envelope) cost 2 cents. Second class (not sealed) needed 1 cent postage.

View more comments

Monday December 25th, 2017

Here's Lost Ottawa wishing you Happy Holidays in our little town on the top of a hill ...

What better way to do it that a Christmas card from from the Canadian Artist Series, designed by A.Y. Jackson, ca.1925?

Jackson was a founding member of the Group of Seven, who moved to the Ottawa area in 1955 and settled in Manotick.
... See MoreSee Less

Heres Lost Ottawa wishing you Happy Holidays in our little town on the top of a hill ... 

What better way to do it that a Christmas card from from the Canadian Artist Series, designed by A.Y. Jackson, ca.1925?

Jackson was a founding member of the Group of Seven, who moved to the Ottawa area in 1955 and settled in Manotick.

8 CommentsComment on Facebook

got your book as a Christmas gift today. It has entertained me for the last 3 hours as it was the first thing I read! thank you.

I have warm memories of AY Jackson himself! When I was in grade 6 in 1972, he was a special guest at the Art Gallery of Ontario and our class had a field trip there. He was guiding our tour there of the works of his Group of 7 paintings. I remember walking behind him, realizing he was famous, and gently touching the back of his chunky Shetland sweater! I told my classmates that I would never wash that hand again lol. I think he was in his late 80s or early 90s.

Thank you Emily. Enjoy your Christmas time without snow! We were dumped on last night and still coming. Have Merry Christmas

View more comments

Sunday December 24th, 2017

I'm not sure if you would really want this Santa visiting your Ottawa home tonight ... he's looking a tad disreputable!

However, Santa here is actually a Dr. Hill, dressed up for a costume ball hosted by Lord and Lady Dufferin in 1876.

Here's the original description from the Ottawa Free Press:

"Loose dark brown blouse, a la Santa Claus, with capuchin trimmed with holly leaves and scarlet berries, flowing white beard; whiskers and moustache, heavy boots turned down showing pink lining, the whole snowed over, and bearing in his hand the time honoured Christmas tree."

(LAC PA-189666)
... See MoreSee Less

Im not sure if you would really want this Santa visiting your Ottawa home tonight ... hes looking a tad disreputable!

However, Santa here is actually a Dr. Hill, dressed up for a costume ball hosted by Lord and Lady Dufferin in 1876.

Heres the original description from the Ottawa Free Press:

Loose dark brown blouse, a la Santa Claus, with capuchin trimmed with holly leaves and scarlet berries, flowing white beard; whiskers and moustache, heavy boots turned down showing pink lining, the whole snowed over, and bearing in his hand the time honoured Christmas tree. 

(LAC PA-189666)

19 CommentsComment on Facebook

This is clearly before Coca-Cola set the standard image for Santa. By about 40 years!

The Dufferin Estate (Clandeboye) is in my hometown of Bangor, County Down

Very evocative of a bygone time before television consumed our creativity

View more comments

Sunday December 24th, 2017

What could be more Ottawa than trudging through the snow on Parliament Hill, arms filled with Christmas presents as more snow flakes fall ...

Looks like this family was going to have a Merry Xmas in 1958.

(LAC Mikan 4949755)
... See MoreSee Less

What could be more Ottawa than trudging through the snow on Parliament Hill, arms filled with Christmas presents as more snow flakes fall ...

Looks like this family was going to have a Merry Xmas in 1958. 

(LAC Mikan 4949755)

9 CommentsComment on Facebook

That would have been my first Christmas in Ottawa, aged 12, and attending Connaught public school on Gladstone Ave. I saw the Parliament Buildings that year, too, for the first time.

To me, this depicts Christmas as I remember it, wonderful peaceful times.

...or going for a skate on the canal on Christmas Eve, then to midnight Mass at St. Patrick's Basilica, then walking home to the very west end..

View more comments

Sunday December 24th, 2017

Looking South down Bronson on December 30, 1942, after the Great Ottawa Ice Storm of of December 28-30.

Freezing rain left ice as thick as a person wrist on wires, tracks, and everything else, literally stopping all streetcars in their tracks.

It took five days to clean things up.

(Photo: Bruce McCallan, shared by Don McCallan.)
... See MoreSee Less

Looking South down Bronson on December 30, 1942, after the Great Ottawa Ice Storm of of December 28-30.

Freezing rain left ice as thick as a person wrist on wires, tracks, and everything else, literally stopping all streetcars in their tracks.

It took five days to clean things up.

(Photo: Bruce McCallan, shared by Don McCallan.)

11 CommentsComment on Facebook

My dad was a city cop and used to speak of a street car that was frozen down during this storm on Confederation Square. The conductor was obliged to stay in it for days. Luckily, it had a little coal stove in it. More luckily, people took his place periodically so that he could go use a bathroom.

Love the shadow front and centre - reminds me of an Orson Welles movie but I can't remember the name.

Wonder if this picture is from early in the storm. I ask this because if the ice was 1-2" thick, I'm sure the wires would be down. Less ice than that in the big storm of '98 brought down hydro towers.

View more comments

Sunday December 24th, 2017

Heading out for a Sunday Drive around Ottawa (or maybe to a hockey game) -- when you are Governor General Earl Grey and it is February of 1909.

The GG is shown here leaving the gates of Rideau Hall in his "four-in-hand" sleigh, along with two guards and several horsemen. Quite the production ... but classier than black Suburbans!

Of course, the Earl could have just taken that streetcar to the left ...
... See MoreSee Less

Heading out for a Sunday Drive around Ottawa (or maybe to a hockey game) -- when you are Governor General Earl Grey and it is February of 1909.

The GG is shown here leaving the gates of Rideau Hall in his four-in-hand sleigh, along with two guards and several horsemen. Quite the production ... but classier than black Suburbans!

Of course, the Earl could have just taken that streetcar to the left ...

12 CommentsComment on Facebook

The robes (blankets) were probably buffalo (bison) skins. When I was young (1950s) that's what you brought along for a sleigh ride.

My mother in law was born at government house her dad was the head coach man . She told us so many wonderful stories about her life there. She did t move too far away when she left there to queen victoria street with her mom and dad. It would be the home she lived in till she passed away.

When living in Ashton Mr. Lewis would take our family for a sleigh rides wrapped in big blankets at Christmas.

View more comments

Sunday December 24th, 2017

When this Ottawa kid comes down -- that's gonna hurt!

No location given ... but I'm pretty sure from other photos in the collection that this that awesome tobogganing hill in the Arboretum. Date is 1952.

Saw some kids there the other day on those thin silicon sheets.

(CSTM CN X-36363)
... See MoreSee Less

When this Ottawa kid comes down -- thats gonna hurt!

No location given ... but Im pretty sure from other photos in the collection that this that awesome tobogganing hill in the Arboretum. Date is 1952.

Saw some kids there the other day on those thin silicon sheets.

(CSTM CN X-36363)

54 CommentsComment on Facebook

I believe we just called it the hill at the'farm'. Yes, we went in the very early 50's. Dad took us on Sunday after Sunday School. The fear of running into a tree seems to stick in my head and a great 'run' ended up on the frozen canal. The hill was really fast and Dad sat at the back steering the toboggan with the kids screaming most of the way down.

Broke my tibia and fibula with a spiral fracture in hole 1 at the larrimac golf course in Chelsea. Was on a gt sno racer at 31 years old. Worst most painful night of my life. Orthopedic surgeon worked for four hours on my leg no anaesthesia because if the booze. He wouldn't come near me on his rounds the next day, must have threatened him. To top it if my buddies son, owner of the sno racer, comes to my bedside in the hospital and says; "you should have turned in the headlight."

I still have the wooden toboggan from the 50’s and it is still splintered. Used to wax it with paste wax to go faster. Walked on the canal from Bank St to the arboretum.

View more comments

Saturday December 23rd, 2017

Here's Lost Ottawa bringing a little Xmas cheer ... to Texas!

Shared by John Ripley, who sent along this note:It arrived just in time for Christmas in Round Rock, TX. Great coffee table book. Nice work, David.
... See MoreSee Less

Heres Lost Ottawa bringing a little Xmas cheer ... to Texas!

Shared by John Ripley, who sent along this note:

14 CommentsComment on Facebook

Christmas morning at the kitchen table - turning through each page and listening to my father and mother-in-law talk about each photo and their memories. Conversation not stopping. Awesome.

Bought a copy in Chapters, met the author David McGee, signed book took time to chat. very personable writer. Took the book home, what a ride, the memories! Wonderful collection.

Really good book..I bought it this wk and I can barely put it down..👍

View more comments

Saturday December 23rd, 2017

Photo illustrating how narrow "suburban" roads could be outside of Ottawa in the 1950s.

Would hate to be be driving this at night ... in a snow storm. It's hardly wide enough for one car.

(Suburban Roads Commission, 1956)
... See MoreSee Less

Photo illustrating how narrow suburban roads could be outside of Ottawa in the 1950s.

Would hate to be be driving this at night ... in a snow storm. Its hardly wide enough for one car.

(Suburban Roads Commission, 1956)

28 CommentsComment on Facebook

I lived on a rural road near North Gower and the snow was so deep at times in the 50s it took a few days for the plow to get through. Our neighbour took us to school on a horse driven sleigh then!

Trim Road... from Navan to Queen Street was one lane for a bit during the winter of '78,,,,, if you met an oncoming car... someone had to back up

May 1971 - but this was post an unusual snow storm - on what is now Rockdale Road quite near and approaching Colonial Road.

View more comments

Saturday December 23rd, 2017

Ottawa kids ready for some tobogganing in front of 375 Second Avenue in the Glebe, looking east towards First Ave in the winter of 1927-28.

The youngsters are identified (left-to-right) as : Jean Fraser (standing); Jean, Shirley, Dodie and Harold Barnhart.

Sweet ride!

(Photo from Bruce McCallan, shared by Don McCallan.)
... See MoreSee Less

Ottawa kids ready for some tobogganing in front of 375 Second Avenue in the Glebe, looking east towards First Ave in the winter of 1927-28. 

The youngsters are identified (left-to-right) as : Jean Fraser (standing); Jean, Shirley, Dodie and Harold Barnhart.

Sweet ride!

(Photo from Bruce McCallan, shared by Don McCallan.)

18 CommentsComment on Facebook

We lived at 61 Second Avenue. Our next door neighbours, The Willoughbys, moved in to their home in 1926. Mr. Willoughby used to tell me stories about the Glebe when I was a little girl (in the sixties). I remember him telling me about the tall Bell building at Bank & First being an exciting addition to the growing neighbourhood.

Those are my Barnhart cousins. The only on remaining is Shirley . Some of my happiest memories are visiting with their mom on Second Ave. They had an attic that was a treasure house forcexploring

I grew up on Fourth Av. between Chrysler and Percy between 1953 to There were always huge snow banks that we walked on to school.

View more comments

Saturday December 23rd, 2017

Enjoying the slopes in Rockcliffe Park in 1916, where three Ottawa ladies wait for their turn on the toboggan run ... and one lady really doesn't all that certain about joys of skiing.

Looks like she had a tumble or two already. And no poles.

Since it was wartime, plenty of lads in uniform were also on hand.

(LAC PA-110906)
... See MoreSee Less

Enjoying the slopes in Rockcliffe Park in 1916, where three Ottawa ladies wait for their turn on the toboggan run ... and one lady really doesnt all that certain about joys of skiing.

Looks like she had a tumble or two already. And no poles.

Since it was wartime, plenty of lads in uniform were also on hand. 

(LAC PA-110906)

8 CommentsComment on Facebook

If you click on the photo and enlarge, the look in the skier's eyes is quite comical. Either fear or determination to beat the hill, I'm not sure which!

This is likely at Suicide Hill. The ski jump had been blown over in May 1915 and was replaced with a tobaggon run for the duration of the war.

Is that in the early years of the Ottawa Ski Club?

View more comments

Saturday December 23rd, 2017

Robert Batsch shares the Morning Puzzler, wondering about these stamps.

Writes Robert:Does anyone know what these are? I'm guessing food rationing stamps? My parents were both immigrants from Germany after the Second World War, so they may not be Canadian.
... See MoreSee Less

Robert Batsch shares the Morning Puzzler, wondering about these stamps.

Writes Robert:

6 CommentsComment on Facebook

must ask my son, as I tried looking them up online. but from what I have seen so far they look like it was for wheat and where is the missing piece of info

My curiosity was peaked so I did some research and found something similar. goo.gl/images/RRysFv I googled "Canadian Ration Stamps" after not finding anything similar through a "German Ration Stamps search. Check out the link...this is what I found. Very similar to your stamps in terms of the style & theme of the graphics.

Can the OP please update when the mystery is solved? Thanks

View more comments

Friday December 22nd, 2017

Preparing for winter at the Equipment and Supply Branch of the Post Office, Ottawa, 1939. The hats were for letter carriers.

My dad had a similar one (although he was not a postie). It sure was warm! I wish I still had it (except for the real fur part).

I believe the Supply Branch was located in the (then) brand new postal station on Besserer, near the train station. Now Lost.

(LAC PA-061834)
... See MoreSee Less

Preparing for winter at the Equipment and Supply Branch of the Post Office, Ottawa, 1939. The hats were for letter carriers. 

My dad had a similar one (although he was not a postie). It sure was warm! I wish I still had it (except for the real fur part).

I believe the Supply Branch was located in the (then) brand new postal station on Besserer, near the train station. Now Lost. 

(LAC PA-061834)

6 CommentsComment on Facebook

My father had one, he was a letter carrier for a time. It was heavy but warm, don't know what happened to it.

What's wrong with real fur? It's a natural material, recyclable and biodegradable, and if we're just moderately careful, supplies will be available for ever. Or we could use some kind of oil-based materials ....

I always like the fur part. The fur trade is what opened this country to the Europeans.

View more comments

Friday December 22nd, 2017

Your Morning Commute though downtown Ottawa, featuring what is now the Queensway in the late '50s/early '60s.

You can see how Elgin used to bend around to meet the Driveway, the narrow swing bridge trains used to cross the Rideau Canal, and many other features of the city as it used to be.

From the Bruce Chapman Collection, put online by Colin Churcher at: tinyurl.com/ycnwcq7n
... See MoreSee Less

Your Morning Commute though downtown Ottawa, featuring what is now the Queensway in the late 50s/early 60s.

You can see how Elgin used to bend around to meet the Driveway, the narrow swing bridge trains used to cross the Rideau Canal, and many other features of the city as it used to be.

From the Bruce Chapman Collection, put online by Colin Churcher at: https://tinyurl.com/ycnwcq7n

33 CommentsComment on Facebook

The future site of the Ottawa Police station used to be Myers Chev-Olds-Cadillac, where it remained until the late '60s or early 70s.

The low, flat warehouse building in the centre of the photo was a car dealership -- Patterson Motors -- they used to sell Plymouth and Dodge cars. The long building at the upper left of the photo on Catherine Street was the former Ottawa Auditorium, now the site of the YM-YWCA.

I still remember walking down Catherine Street past the Auditorium one night. I stopped at the traffic light and three elephants went across in front of me. ?????? The Aud was hosting a circus and the elephants were going back to the circus train, which was in the rail yard just across the street.

View more comments

Friday December 22nd, 2017

Workmen from the E. Leblanc company do their best to haul a giant crown up the Peace Tower, getting ready for the Royal Visit of King George VI and Queen Elizabeth (the Mum) to Ottawa in 1939.

They all look like they are holding on for dear life, but I love the guys standing on the roof of the truck.

(Toronto Public Library TSP_0107440)
... See MoreSee Less

Workmen from the E. Leblanc company do their best to haul a giant crown up the Peace Tower, getting ready for the Royal Visit of King George VI and Queen Elizabeth (the Mum) to Ottawa in 1939.

They all look like they are holding on for dear life, but I love the guys standing on the roof of the truck.

(Toronto Public Library TSP_0107440)

12 CommentsComment on Facebook

WOW, what a great pic. Gives you a good idea of how things were done before all the equipment used today.

Love the guys holding on to the guys on the roof of the truck! Or are they holding on to the truck? lol

A lot more people died or were injured in workplace accidents back then than today.

View more comments

Thursday December 21st, 2017

Kids hauling a Christmas tree in this holiday season photo, taken by famous Ottawa photographer Malak Karsh in 1957 for an NFB photo story.

The location is a bit of a puzzler, though. I'm thinking Rideau River ... ?

Shared Cindy Lu from a recent post by Library and Archives Canada.

(LAC Mikan 4949130)
... See MoreSee Less

Kids hauling a Christmas tree in this holiday season photo, taken by famous Ottawa photographer Malak Karsh in 1957 for an NFB photo story.

The location is a bit of a puzzler, though. Im thinking Rideau River ... ?

Shared Cindy Lu from a recent post by Library and Archives Canada. 

(LAC Mikan 4949130)

30 CommentsComment on Facebook

Here's the original caption from the photo story, which was about Canada's Xmas tree industry: The tradition of hiking into the woods a few days before Christmas to select the Yule tree is becoming more and more a memory nostalgically recalled by old-timers. Today most Canadians content themselves with making their selection at the local super-market, but Canada's vigorously growing Christmas tree industry assures that they may make their choice from a selection that is large, varied and handsome.

I remember back in the 70s when some Carleton university residents crossed the canal at Christmas to the Arboretum and cut themselves a Christmas tree. Only problem was they took only the top 6 feet of a 30+ foot Siberian spruce that was a one of a kind gift to Canada. They dragged it back to the residence through the snow not thinking about getting caught. They got caught.

Was that shared by Cindy Lu Who, of Whoville?

View more comments

Thursday December 21st, 2017

Chris Tyler shares a post about the Kaufman brothers, owners of the Belle Claire Hotel on Queen Street, and Ottawa entrepreneurs extraordinaire.

For more on the Belle Claire, see our next post.

Meanwhile, writes Chris:My boss and mentor, Harry Koffman. Harry and his brother, Sammy, owned the Belle Claire Hotel on Queen Street, a piece of Ottawa history in itself. From politicians to street punks, everyone in Centre Town knew the Belle Clair. Harry also ran a sign shop. After leaving Frieman's Department Store on Rideau in 1938, he went to work for himself. His first shop was somewhere on Sparks Street, close to Elgin. From there, he went to the south west corner of Bank and Gilmour, where Bridgehead Coffee House is now. In 1963, he bought 146-148 Nepean Street. I used to watch him hand letter paper banners and show cards for all the Bank Street merchants while he was watching Barney Miller on TV. He didn't even need to watch what he was doing, he was that good. The Koffman family was well known back then, Ottawa was still small. Koffman's Ladies Wear on Slater, Koffman Waste Management..., Harry's brother Frank who wrote the sports column for the Ottawa Journal, the list goes on. I'm proud to have worked with him for so many years, he taught me so much. Here's a picture of Harry with Doug Bernhardt in front of the shop. Taken in 2003.
... See MoreSee Less

Chris Tyler shares a post about the Kaufman brothers, owners of the Belle Claire Hotel on Queen Street, and Ottawa entrepreneurs extraordinaire.

For more on the Belle Claire, see our next post.

Meanwhile, writes Chris:

17 CommentsComment on Facebook

A sign from the Kaufman shop shared by Chris via Michel Perron, along with this comment: Hand lettered in 1963. One of the first signs Harry painted for the "New" shop. Purchased for 12,600 bucks the day after Kennedy got shot in November 1963 and sold for well over a million last year. Back in 2003, I asked him where I should be putting my money. He looked at me and said, "Let's get you some downtown property " best advice ever. Miss you Herschell. You'll always be my Zady. Oy-vay!

Harry remains one of my favorite people of all Time, I've been in the print industry in Ottawa for more than 25 years now and Harry is certainly one of my best memories, He scared the pants off me when I first met him ,within a few months he was making me laugh on every visit, what a great Pic. thanks for sharing

I remember Harry (and his cigar)! I would go and visit him at his shop on Nepean whenever I came back to Ottawa. Has the building come down?

View more comments

Thursday December 21st, 2017

Winter on Wellington Street in this downtown Ottawa street scene, featuring cars of the Depression Era parked along Wellington in 1935.

The building in the middle was the Union Bank Building, completed in 1888, and part of what was once known as “Bankers’ Row.” Royal Trust moved in later.

Building on the left was the Quebec Bank, I believe, but no longer exists. I thought that was the "Norlite" National Press building on the right, but it's actually the Victoria Building, as several people noted ...

(Toronto Public Library tspa_0107344f)
... See MoreSee Less

Winter on Wellington Street in this downtown Ottawa street scene, featuring cars of the Depression Era parked along Wellington in 1935.

The building in the middle was the Union Bank Building, completed in 1888, and part of what was once known as “Bankers’ Row.” Royal Trust moved in later.

Building on the left was the Quebec Bank, I believe, but no longer exists. I thought that was the Norlite National Press building on the right, but its actually the Victoria Building, as several people noted ...

(Toronto Public Library tspa_0107344f)

7 CommentsComment on Facebook

Norlite is in the next block west; that's the Victoria Building

The Bank of Canada originally had it's offices in the Victoria Building from 1935 until it's own building was completed in 1938 further west down Wellington between Bank St. and Kent St.

Curtis is correct that is the Victoria Bldg which once housed some CBC radio studios and then CKPM radio where I began working in late 1964. The Norlite still sits on the west side of the old B of M and if you moved down the block to near the corner of Metcalfe you would have passed the old Rideau Club.

View more comments

Wednesday December 20th, 2017

Your Evening Commute, featuring some excellent Ottawa automobiles in the shade, out front of the Chateau Laurier in the later 1950s.

Daly Building on the left. Across the street is the Honey Dew, but the Bowles Lunch seems to have changed into a Scott's Coffee Shop.

Shared by James Guthrie.Rideau St. circa 1950's
... See MoreSee Less

Your Evening Commute, featuring some excellent Ottawa automobiles in the shade, out front of the Chateau Laurier in the later 1950s.

Daly Building on the left. Across the street is the Honey Dew, but the Bowles Lunch seems to have changed into a Scotts Coffee Shop.

Shared by James Guthrie.

13 CommentsComment on Facebook

Where and why did they all go?

I agree - around 1957, no earlier. And before 1959 as there is a streetcar in the pic. The stretch Airport limo was a 1957 Chrysler, and could be seen regularly in front of the Chateau for about another 5-6 years. It looks brand new in this pic.

Didn't realize there were so many buildings across from the Chateau and the Daly building. I thought there was only the train station. Looks very different now.

View more comments

Get More Posts