Lost Ottawa Facebook 2014

Here are all the Lost Ottawa posts that appeared on Facebook in 2014, starting with the most recent and going backwards.

You can view the posts in various ways. You can read the descriptions on this page and see the initial comments. You can click on the three dots at the bottom of a post to see more comments. You can click on the picture to see a “full screen” version of the picture with comments. You can view the original post on Facebook and leave more comments there.

At the bottom of the page there is a “Get More Posts” link that will load additional posts to the page. We are still working on a way to make the posts searchable.

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Tuesday December 30th, 2014
Lost Ottawa

Ottawa residence of W. Lamb located on Robert Street, built of concrete, and featured in a "souvenir| album of the International Portland Cement Company, published around 1910-15.

The cement company was located in Hull and, possibly as a result, Ottawa was in somewhat of forefront of new concrete construction after the run of the century. This house, for example, seems to have used immense cement blocks, imitating bricks.

Just around the corner from the Armenian Embassy, this house still exists, and the use of the blocks is worth checking out. Alas, the house has been horribly disfigured by the addition of a awful enclosed staircase on front.
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Ottawa residence of W. Lamb located on Robert Street, built of concrete, and featured in a souvenir| album of the International Portland Cement Company, published around 1910-15.

The cement company was located in Hull and, possibly as a result, Ottawa was in somewhat of forefront of new concrete construction after the run of the century. This house, for example, seems to have used immense cement blocks, imitating bricks. 

Just around the corner from the Armenian Embassy, this house still exists, and the use of the blocks is worth checking out. Alas, the house has been horribly disfigured by the addition of a awful enclosed staircase on front.

Comment on Facebook

House looks much smaller in streetview (first house in from Queen E)-- and that addition is horrible (what were they thinking!). I had wondered how so many early homes had concrete basements, and had noticed "bricks" in this style and wondered about them-- thank you for the explanation (that portland cement company in Hull). Didn't realize Ottawa was on the forefront of concrete, as well as electric lighting and debit cards!

Only in Ottawa can they masacre or tear down beautiful heritage buildings.

Spectacular house...how could anyone have obtained a permit to do that to it? Hideous.

Disfigurement is the best way to describe what's been done to this majestic property. How could they do such a thing?

Here is another view of the house in 1912 (on the left)...this is from a brochure booklet trying to sell Brantwood Place...depicting Ottawa's fine residences...

It appears they did try to match the old bricks - it's just ugly.

Even better - 2012

Here's a Google shot from 2009 - you can see the construction a little better. Also, the ugly addition appears to be cement blocks too.

It is a beauty as is tho , or was

The Boyd Bros Cement Factory in Osgoode made decorative cement blocks used in many homes and building in the area too.

Tsk, tsk, tsk.......

I'm not sure where "1910-15" comes from. The publication date of this book, "Souvenir of the History, Development and Future of Portland Cement.", was more like 1909.

If this is it on Robert Street, it sure is disfigured. I couldn't get a better angle in Google Maps without a tree masking the view.

Is this house in the berg. I'm sure I recognize the turret

I totally agree about the disfigurement! Looks like it was turned into a rental property with a stairway hall...... you hardly see the turret at all anymore!

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Tuesday December 30th, 2014
Lost Ottawa

Crazy Ottawa. We've had pictures of the SciTech Museum's Crazy Kitchen before ... but never one of the guys who built it!

Here they are. Apparently they thought is was best to wear safety helmets.

(CSTM NMST J-19714)
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Crazy Ottawa. Weve had pictures of the SciTech Museums Crazy Kitchen before ... but never one of the guys who built it! 

Here they are. Apparently they thought is was best to wear safety helmets. 

(CSTM NMST J-19714)

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An Ottawa institution, hopefully will not be lost.

I rmember it looking like this. It still is my favorite place in the entire place!

I love the crazy kitchen. It will always be one of my best childhood memories 🙂

That was my favourite spot The crazy kitchen...I took my nephew there years a later. He loved it.. I can't go into it anymore .MY balance is so bad I fall over.

Thanks, guys. Crazy kitchen is great.

I've oftern thought the same thing as i stumble through it.

What were they thinking...sure gave us kids a lot of chuckles, good going, and man did we think about it later!!!! Hats off to you !!!

Well, they are in construction...

One of our freinds designed it.

Any idea, what their names are?

Is it too plagued with mold?

I used to love going there!!

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Tuesday December 30th, 2014
Lost Ottawa

Ottawa Homes. Here is the residence of George.A. Crain at 285 Clemow, designed by prominent local architect C.P. Meredith, and published in Construction magazine for 1911.

What's interesting here is not just the style, but the absence of anything around it at the time.

The house is still there on the Northwest corner of Clemow and Percy.
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Ottawa Homes. Here is the residence of George.A. Crain at 285 Clemow, designed by prominent local architect C.P. Meredith, and published in Construction magazine for 1911. 

Whats interesting here is not just the style, but the absence of anything around it at the time. 

The house is still there on the Northwest corner of Clemow and Percy.

Comment on Facebook

Still looks great!

What's particularly interesting is that this was designed by an architect. It's rare today that people make it a priority to hire a professional to design the biggest investment of their lives. The fact that this house is still standing, and in good shape (apparently) shows that the investment is worth it. But that's my bias showing.

Interesting that the lot was considered limiting back then. It's still a lovely house, if one can believe Google Maps.

If you check it out on street view it looks so beautiful with the apple trees and fallen blossoms.

Would be really interesting if the original cost of the home and lot was posted. Clearly built to last. Love Lost Ottawa.

ypu got to be kidding TOM GRAY ...this is an absolutly grand looking house !!!as far as im concerned and many others as well think so

Beautiful, still

beautiful!!

1911 urban sprawl.!! Nothing good will come from this type of suburban development. It is not conducive to transit. It should be torn down and a glass walled condo put up.

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Monday December 29th, 2014
Lost Ottawa

You won't see this view of Ottawa too often -- looking up Metcalfe from Queen to see the Library of Parliament sitting there.

There's no Parliament Buildings in front because its Fall of 1916. Following the fire, Centre Block had been demolished. Seems that reconstruction hadn't quite started when this picture was taken.

Also featured on the right ... one of those new fangled electric light posts for which Ottawa was famous.

(LAC Mikan 3325989, shared by Victoria Edwards)
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You wont see this view of Ottawa too often -- looking up Metcalfe from Queen to see the Library of Parliament sitting there.

Theres no Parliament Buildings in front because its Fall of 1916. Following the fire, Centre Block had been demolished. Seems that reconstruction hadnt quite started when this picture was taken.

Also featured on the right ... one of those new fangled electric light posts for which Ottawa was famous.

(LAC Mikan 3325989, shared by Victoria Edwards)

Comment on Facebook

Same location about 20 years later (MIKAN 4170047)

Wow I was born in Ottawa and stayed there for 59 years. My Mother told me so many wonderful stories about Ottawa. I really miss those stories.

My earliest memories of this intersecton (Queen and Metcalfe) in the early 60s featured the brand new TD Bank Building. The Windsor Hotel had been torn down a year or two earlier. Wasn't the Windsor Hotel where the first electric oven cooked meal in the world was served back in the 1890s?

such a beautiful city and we destroyed all these buildings 🙁

Very nice. The first thing I eye caught was the Windsor Hotel.

The Windsor must have moved at sometime too. I remember I was at The Windsor on its last night of business before being knocked down to build the World Exchange Plaza which is kitty corner to this Windsor.

nice one!

Wow, good picture, love it, thanks!

Is that a horse drawn carriage hiding behind the post?

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Monday December 29th, 2014
Lost Ottawa

Timeline Photos ... See MoreSee Less

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why is it so frustratingly small?

Et a droite la piscine Flatrock dans le parc Stanley

Monday December 29th, 2014
Lost Ottawa

Downtown Ottawa from the roof of Union Station, circa 1938.

A working boat passes under the Plaza, where there was a parking lot in front of the old Post Office. Below the wall is the track that took trains over the Alexandra Bridge to Hull.

There was also streetcar service to Hull at this time, and this picture makes me wonder if the car actually stopped on the other side of the bridge, where you would exit directly into the Chateau Laurier.

(CSTM CN-29470)
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Downtown Ottawa from the roof of Union Station, circa 1938. 

A working boat passes under the Plaza, where there was a parking lot in front of the old Post Office. Below the wall is the track that took trains over the Alexandra Bridge to Hull. 

There was also streetcar service to Hull at this time, and this picture makes me wonder if the car actually stopped on the other side of the bridge, where you would exit directly into the Chateau Laurier.

(CSTM CN-29470)

Comment on Facebook

I agree that the transportation links in the greater Ottawa-Outaouais region appear to have been better in 1938 than they are now. The train tracks you see in this photo went all the way to Maniwaki. Today, we don't even have a tourist train going to Wakefield! Plus, they had a downtown rail station which we sorely miss now.

The trains that crossed the Alexandria Bridge were CPR trains. If they were west bound on in Ontario, they returned from Quebec on the Lemieux Island Bridge and then continued westward along what is now the TransitWay parallel to Scott Street, along the stretch of the Ottawa River Parkway at the present end of the below ground section, and then went parallel to Richmond Road west to McEwan Avenue. The rest of the rail line is now the western bike path that continues right out to Kanata. Had there been any wisdom in the heads of city planners, mayors and counsellors, that right of way should never have been released for development. It is the path that now could be the Light Rail Corridor from downtown, westward to Kanata and even as far west as Carleton Place. Much of the right of way remains today but those who enjoy it as bike paths and snow mobile routes will never give it up to motorized transportation again. I watched it disappear through my early childhood and always in my mind could see that one day the mistakes of giving it over to other than transit was a terrible misjudgement. After releasing the rail line across the Alexander Bridge, even the CPR had to find an alternate route when they decided to run a passenger service along the North Shore to Montreal. Their Dayliners, as they were called, had to go south and join what is now the 'O' train line across the Rideau at Carleton University and then Northward to cross into Quebec via the Lemieux Island Bridge. The competition with the more direct and certainly quicker Ontario CN lines to Montreal partly lead to the demise of CPR as a passenger railway. Although the Dayliners were faster than a conventional train, the circuit route around Ottawa added too much time to the Ottawa/Montreal trip and it was never financially successful. I remember taking that trip twice as a child. The scenery along the Quebec North Shore route was far more enjoyable than the boring flat corn fields of the CN Ontario train. But I was a kid, not a businessman in a hurry to get to some financial related endeavour in Montreal!

Better transport links than we have today. So much for progress!

From 1875-1880

The Hull Electric Railway had a streetcar turning loop underneath the Plaza Bridge, connecting directly with the Chateau Laurier. The tunnel is still there and last time I checked (several years ago) was being used for storage of rental bikes.

What a beautiful shot,thanks for all the story.

Not that I can remember. It would be impractical to start a train rolling only to have it halt again after only a few dozen metres. I seem to recall that hotel guests would check out and have red cap porters bring their luggage all the way from the front desk to the railway platform.

I remember arriving, aged 11, at the station on November 15, 1956, from England via Montreal, meeting my father and taking the taxi to our new home in Hull.

I'm curious, what was the building which was replaced by the War Memorial?

So it looks like the arches under the plaza are now the support for connection between Elgin and Wellington/Rideau. Very cool. Thanks for posting this picture!

Forgetting the never end raging debate about the closure of Union Station and the relocation of passenger rail operations to the Alta Vista area, does anyone have an idea about the history of the boat going through the canal. I have seen photos of the Rideau King and Rideau Queen and I remember seeing the tug Loretta tied up near Clowes Lock where it was scrapped but the shot of this particular one is quite interesting. Does anyone have details; it would indicate that the canal had freight traffic on it at least to the end of the 1930s, perhaps even later??

A lot of people talk about the short-sightedness of politicians and planners who removed the trains and tracks from downtown Ottawa. But at the time, many people genuinely believed that trains were headed for obsolescence. Perfectly reasonable people looked at the progress of both the automobile and aviation during the twentieth century and had every reason to believe that these would be the dominant modes in the future (as they did become). Almost nobody between 1900 and the 1960s could have easily predicted the environmental, social or economic problems that dependence on cars and planes might bring. Instead of blaming people in the past for getting us into this fix, we should be demanding more, better solutions to our transportation problems from today's leaders.

Was that the old Agnes P Barge that used to go up and down the canal?

Amazing image.

Very cool photo

Great photo.

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Sunday December 28th, 2014
Lost Ottawa

Lost Ottawa Evening Puzzler: While a young lad observes the photographer, the "Chez Buck" Restaurant and Grocery takes delivery from a Wrightville Beverages truck.

Chez Buck says "King Edward" on the top. So this is the corner Edward and ... ?

Shared by Gilles Pacquette.
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Lost Ottawa Evening Puzzler: While a young lad observes the photographer, the Chez Buck Restaurant and Grocery takes delivery from a Wrightville Beverages truck. 

Chez Buck says King Edward on the top. So this is the corner Edward and ... ?

Shared by Gilles Pacquette.

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Found this picture of a bottle from Wrightville Beverages in Hull, Quebec . . .

L. Sarazin, Grocer, 249 Clarence St. at King Edward. Happy New Year.

Here is the original photo, which confirms the location as Clarence.

I'm not sure 249 King Edward makes sense. The number is over the angled doorway, so the address might refer to the cross street. If so, it would have to be the NW corner (odd numbers on N side.) The lighting fits that as well. I'll guess 249 Guigues.

Brian Woodard, you`re right, 249 King Edward E, at Clarence. Never seen this store or picture before. It`s great.

clarence at king edward, 1938.

Used to go here everyday on the way to York Street Public School...to buy candy of course..

I say it's either king Edward and Rideau or king Edward and St Patrick

King Edwards and Quigues.....

King Edward et Guigues.

249 King Edward would be at Murray St.

Love the truck! And the kid’s outfit!

I think it is Murray Street

it's at Clarence St.; Church building still stands across the Street www.google.ca/maps/@45.4311987,-75.6877396,3a,34.8y,245.52h,92.87t/data=!3m4!1e1!3m2!1sALL9MbAiog...

Hey Clint Ford: Look at that TRUCK! 😀

Clarence and King Edward for sure. The church is still there and you can see it on street view. The Store is now an apartment building next to Shepherds of good hope.

King Edward and Clarence St

It might be Cathcart st at Redeau st.

5 cents for a Pepsi

Its at Champa Tai,Guigeus at King Edward. If you look beside first balcony, you'll see a piece of masonary that looks like a rounded birdhouse. Its visible in the streetview version... maps.google.com/maps?ll=45.433299,-75.689507&spn=0.000581,0.000871&t=h&z=21&layer=c&cbll=45.43336...

Murray St according to the address 249

I think it's where the Pizzaria is now...

Buck was my great uncle.

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Sunday December 28th, 2014
Lost Ottawa

Looking west over Lowertown towards Uppertown Ottawa in 1968, shared by Gilles Paquette.

The skyline is still dominated by the spires of churches and parliament in this amazing panorama.
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Looking west over Lowertown towards Uppertown Ottawa in 1968, shared by Gilles Paquette.

The skyline is still dominated by the spires of churches and parliament in this amazing panorama.

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I just love looking at how Ottawa once was in px, wishing that some of those legendary places were still in existence instead of dull condo crap and empty rundown spaces snd eyesores that exist now....

In the 60's I went on the double Ferris wheel at the EX and from that way also the parliament buildings could be seen when we were on the top of the wheel .

Came to Canada in 1966, live off of Merryvale, remember climbing the resovoir on top of carlington ski hill and looking downtown, hardly in skyscrapers then

the view wouldn't be a whole lot different today. this would be from Wurtemburg St.

photo is taken between henry & clarence on wurtemburg street.

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Sunday December 28th, 2014
Lost Ottawa

Sunday Driver: Ottawa couple examine would could just be their very first car, on display at the Science and Tech Museum on St. Laurent, not long after it opened in 1967.

The car is a Ford Model T, from what they call the Brass Era, complete with acetylene gas-burning brass headlamps.

(CSTM NMST J-19549-2)
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Sunday Driver: Ottawa couple examine would could just be their very first car, on display at the Science and Tech Museum on St. Laurent, not long after it opened in 1967. 

The car is a Ford Model T, from what they call the Brass Era, complete with acetylene gas-burning brass headlamps.

(CSTM NMST J-19549-2)

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Missed seeing all those great exhibits that hs been stored away to what had been a great museum./

Saturday December 27th, 2014
Lost Ottawa

Saturday Night. Ottawa House in Hull from way back in the day.

Not sure if it was as notorious then as it later became, but it sure has a huge Brading's sign on the top!

During Prohibition in Ontario (1919-1927), the Bradings Brewery on Wellington Street could not sell beer in Ottawa ... but they could sell in Quebec. I suspect the picture is from this era due, when many deliveries were still made by horse and wagon.

(No source)
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Saturday Night. Ottawa House in Hull from way back in the day. 

Not sure if it was as notorious then as it later became, but it sure has a huge Bradings sign on the top!

During Prohibition in Ontario (1919-1927), the Bradings Brewery on Wellington Street could not sell beer in Ottawa ... but they could sell in Quebec. I suspect the picture is from this era due, when many deliveries were still made by horse and wagon.

(No source)

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I had many good times at the O.H. No bad experiences there for me, just enjoyment and good loud Bands! I remember the lady walking around with the hard-boiled eggs and french fries!

Checkered tablecloths, quarts of Molsons' finest & Harry Young doing 'Whole Lotta Love' better than Led Zeppelin! Or maybe the Molsons just made it seem better. Anyways there were people lined up around the block waiting to get in ... they obviously felt the same way!

Pascal, it was on Eddy St.

Great bands in the late 50's, early 60's. Red Shea, later guitarist for Gordie Lightfoot, played some fine tunes here wit Larry Lee and the Leisures (really).

Yes Harry Young and the Noblemen would be standing room only and the music moved me to dance and since that was not permitted it also moved me out the door more than once

Just proves how stupid prohibition was

Pickled eggs and crackers

1972, was the first time I ever had a quart of beer. (Possible I had more than one that night) & it was a Molson Canadian. When you asked for a Canadian they would yell to the bartender "one Red".

Tipped more than a few at the "O.H."

Wasn't it the Texas downstairs? They said that when the building burnt down in the 80s(I think) that all of Ottawa/Hull got stoned from the fumes...lol

I think the OH is where JG and I (and presumably others) watched the Leafs win the Stanley Cup in 1967, much to JG' chagrin, he being a big Habs fan and also because of a foolish bet he made half way through the game.

In the late 60s and early 70s, my friends & I spent every Friday evening at the OH and Saturday evenings at the Green Door at the Chaud. Great memories.

I had a favorite waiter at the OH. I think his name was "Roger". I loved this place in the early 70s. I found the staff very friendly. Like the Chaudiere, there were many paintings done on the walls.

Was it in lebretanr flat

Bin there.

Spent lots of Sunday afternoons there great memories of the O.H.

so cool Barbara

Yes I spent some time there as well... and the Glenlea too 🙂

Had my last illegal drink here before I turned 21. Great memories!

Interesting about prohibition days!

Spent a bit of time at the Ottawa House, great memories

OH was our hangout too in the 70's. 90cents a quart with 10cent tip. Who remembers frequent bands like Terry Dee? Great music there for sure. Always had fun there and no trouble.

Where was it located?

Ottawa House the best place to go for a drink after school. Enjoyed every minute there with them loud bands

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Saturday December 27th, 2014
Lost Ottawa

Something you really wouldn't want to do in the Ottawa River in December -- go for a dip in the Ottawa River.

The occasion was test of of aircrew survival suits from a dinghy by the Test and Development Establishment of RCAF, Rockcliffe. The date is December 27, 1943.

I hop the suits worked ... Brrrr!

(LAC PA-064799)
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Something you really wouldnt want to do in the Ottawa River in December -- go for a dip in the Ottawa River.

The occasion was test of of aircrew survival suits from a dinghy by the Test and Development Establishment of RCAF, Rockcliffe. The date is December 27, 1943.

I hop the suits worked ... Brrrr!

(LAC PA-064799)

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This sort of work was moved to Toronto where it is still done by the Defence and Civil Institute of Environmental Medicine.

Friday December 26th, 2014
Lost Ottawa

Ottawa fleet of shiny Canadian National Express trucks, lined up on the lawn in front the Armouries on Laurier in 1935.

At the time, CN filled the role now played by Purolator, FedeX, and UPS. These chaps would have been really busy during the holidays, delivering all those presents!

(CSTM CN-38489)
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Ottawa fleet of shiny Canadian National Express trucks, lined up on the lawn in front the Armouries on Laurier in 1935.

At the time, CN filled the role now played by Purolator, FedeX, and UPS. These chaps would have been really busy during the holidays, delivering all those presents!

(CSTM CN-38489)

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The correct name of the 'armouries' ( not capitalized) is 'The Drill Hall'.

Weren't the armouries on Rideau (now expensive condos)?

And they were not afraid of big boxes. place I worked at in the 1970 era often used them until they exited the small package business.

Cartier Drill Hall -still there!Cameron Highlander Regiment & Governor General Foot Guards Cadet& Reserve units have headquarters there.

It is the Drill Hall on Cartier Square at the Laurier Bridge.

Armories are east of today's City Hall.

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Friday December 26th, 2014
Lost Ottawa

Student protesters in Ottawa mount a Christmas Day rally in 1960, to protest the presence of fifty-six nuclear weapons on Canadian soil.

The weapons in question were the Bomarc B missiles that John Diefenbaker's government (and later Pearson's Liberals) agreed to base at North Bay, Ontario, and La Macaza, Quebec.

The students came from 17 different universities and thought they would present their petition to Members of Parliament -- only to discover this was Ottawa and no one was working. They then marched to Rideau Hall, only to discover the Governor General was also absent.
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Student protesters in Ottawa mount a Christmas Day rally in 1960, to protest the presence of fifty-six nuclear weapons on Canadian soil.

The weapons in question were the Bomarc B missiles that John Diefenbakers government (and later Pearsons Liberals) agreed to base at North Bay, Ontario, and La Macaza, Quebec.

The students came from 17 different universities and thought they would present their petition to Members of Parliament -- only to discover this was Ottawa and no one was working. They then marched to Rideau Hall, only to discover the Governor General was also absent.

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Would anybody, whether they had made it to university or not, honestly expect anyone to be working on Parliament Hill on Christmas day, beyond maybe some maintenance staff and a couple of RCMP?

Contrary to the cynics below, Terry and Kevin, (;-), believe it or not, but protests get more attention when picked up by the media than by MPs when they are sitting in the house and not looking out the window. MPs read newspapers, or so we learned in school.

But they did get their picture in the papers, and a few years later, notoriety on Lost Ottawa.

I guess they need to go back to school and learn what,s open on Christmas day.

The story about the Bomarc missiles is even more interesting than the blurb above suggests. Diefenbaker (the Progressive Conservative) ended up opposing the installation of Bomarc missiles that Pearson (the Liberal) supported. The military agreed to the placement behind the back of Diefenbaker (whose government was split on the issue), and Pearson argued it was needed to show NORAD solidarity. The 1963 election hinged partly over this debate, and the Conservatives lost.

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Friday December 26th, 2014
Lost Ottawa

Interesting view of one of Ottawa's famous "temporary" buildings, shared by Robert Beaupre.

The puzzler is, from what building was this picture taken?

Robert writes:Old Naval headquarters in Ottawa circa 1940.Now it's the Ottawa Courthouse on Elgin across from Place Bell.
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Interesting view of one of Ottawas famous temporary buildings, shared by Robert Beaupre.

The puzzler is, from what building was this picture taken?

Robert writes:

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It must be taken from the Lord Elgin Hotel. That looks like the First Baptist Church on the corner of Laurier and Elgin in the right hand corner.

picture taken from the Lord Elgin hotel?

probably taken by a Soviet spy from the Lord Elgin Hotel

The only choice is The Lord Elgin Hotel. Why even ask? The Gillin Building on Laurier was not built until the '60's.

Laurier and Elgin Cartier square I agree it was taken from the top floor or roof of the Lord Elgin

My guess is the Lord Elgin as well

My mom also worked in that building. I remember visiting her at work one day and walking across one of the interior courtyards.

Thanks for posting such an awesome photo. My dad worked in those "temporary war administration" buildings in the 70s 🙂

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Friday December 26th, 2014
Lost Ottawa

Many folks will be traveling today, by one means or another. Here's a look south over the train sheds of Ottawa's Union Station, circa 1928, as a loco builds up steam for departure.

Sandy Hill on the left, Laurier Street Bridge and the canal on the right.

As a matter of fact, Lost Ottawa is on its way to Washington right about now.

(CSTM CN-29480)
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Many folks will be traveling today, by one means or another. Heres a look south over the train sheds of Ottawas Union Station, circa 1928, as a loco builds up steam for departure. 

Sandy Hill on the left, Laurier Street Bridge and the canal on the right.

As a matter of fact, Lost Ottawa is on its way to Washington right about now.

(CSTM CN-29480)

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Thanks for sharing such a great photo. Wishing Lost Ottawa and all contributors a great new year full of health, happiness and good fortunes. Looking forward to mane new glimpses of old Ottawa in the new year.

Just curious, was Laurier Ave previously called Laurier Street? (I see street used fairly often and I've always wondered!). I'm aware of the former names (Maria and Theodore), just not Laurier Street in Ottawa (vs Rue Laurier in Gatineau).

That was the way to travel

we lived on Steward Street three blocks from Laurier and in french we always said rue Laurier but in english it has always been Laurier Avenue East or West... really do not know why ...maybe someone else has an answer ..Eglise Sacre Coeur (the old majestic one that burned) was on Laurier Avenue but rue Laurier in french... wonder

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Thursday December 25th, 2014
Lost Ottawa

Lost Ottawa Xmas: Last stop for the Freiman's Santa Claus Mystery Special train. Namely, the Departure Hall of Union Station. There, the annual Freiman's event went into yet another gear.

The kids had already gone by rail to Vars, where Santa arrived by helicopter. Then they all got hysterical as Santa walked from car to car spreading Xmas cheer. But it wasn't over.

Back in the station the kids were met by a marching band, complete with Majorettes, and then greeted by Mayor Charlotte Whitton (on the podium with Santa there). And then there was Toyland!

(CSTM CN 52638)
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Lost Ottawa Xmas: Last stop for the Freimans Santa Claus Mystery Special train. Namely, the Departure Hall of Union Station. There, the annual Freimans event went into yet another gear. 

The kids had already gone by rail to Vars, where Santa arrived by helicopter. Then they all got hysterical as Santa walked from car to car spreading Xmas cheer. But it wasnt over. 

Back in the station the kids were met by a marching band, complete with Majorettes, and then greeted by Mayor Charlotte Whitton (on the podium with Santa there). And then there was Toyland!

(CSTM CN 52638)

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I help hold back the crowds in front of A J Frieman's when Santa came down from the station 1960 . I was a trainee buyer!

The marching band was the GGFG Band and the majorettes were those of the Ottawa Roughriders.

Here's Charlotte Whitton reading a ceremonial proclamation welcoming Santa Claus to Ottawa. This was Saturday, November 17, 1956. (Photo from the Andrews-Newton Collection, City of Ottawa Archives)

I'm pretty sure I'm in this photo somewhere? I remember lining up in front of Frieman's on Rideau street one year to see Santa in the front windows... they had transformed it into like a santa's workshop ...anyone else remember this? But Charolotte ...best damn mayor Ottawa ever had.

I rode that train !

Definitly early 50s. My dad use to take me to this event every year cause he worked for railway. Probably in this picture somewhere.

I use to work for Freiman years later in the garage parking lot across the street then in the shoe department( good times)

Oh but the good old days.

Because of my connection with the GGFG band and seeing the personages in the band I would say that the photo was taken between 1957 and 1959.

What a wonderful idea,wished I could have done that.

That was so much fun every year. I wonder if it would be successful now a days.

Retail. .., today it's .. Take the money & run. !!

How come I never got to go on this train! Pout!

Francine: I remember going to this train station..but not to meet Santa..

Charlotte Whitton. She always seemed like "one tough cookie to me", but she was a very clever lady. This photo has to be from either the early 50's, or early 60's if she was Mayor.

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Thursday December 25th, 2014
Lost Ottawa

Lost Ottawa Xmas: On board the Freiman's Santa Claus train heading back to Ottawa from Vars in November of 1956. The kids are super-excited because Santa is walking from car to car -- and he's about to arrive!

Every year from at least 1956 to 1961, Freiman's put on this crazy event in which Santa flew into Vars by helicopter to meet a train full of kids departing from Union Station. Some years there as many as 20 coaches.

The kids look ridiculously happy.

(CSTM CN 52638)
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Lost Ottawa Xmas: On board the Freimans Santa Claus train heading back to Ottawa from Vars in November of 1956. The kids are super-excited because Santa is walking from car to car -- and hes about to arrive!

Every year from at least 1956 to 1961, Freimans put on this crazy event in which Santa flew into Vars by helicopter to meet a train full of kids departing from Union Station. Some years there as many as 20 coaches.

The kids look ridiculously happy.

(CSTM CN 52638)

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Not sure if was still sponsored by Freiman's but there was a Santa train well in the late 60s

I was one of those kids...

I worked for Freiman's they were a great company. Worked for Mrs. Degler in accounting.

These Freiman train images are delightful!

My first train trip was on one of these. Would have been in the early 60's.

If I remember to get on board you had to bring an end wrapper from Morrison Lamothe bread. They made Donald Duck bread amongst other products.

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Thursday December 25th, 2014
Lost Ottawa

Lost Ottawa Xmas: A group of kids in Vars wave goodbye to Santa, as the Freiman's Santa Claus train heads back to Ottawa Union Station in November of 1956.

Part of a Christmas promotion put on by Freiman's every year from at least 1956 to 1961, in which Santa would fly into Vars by helicopter to meet a train full of kids from Ottawa.

One adult in the middle looks super sad!

(CSTM CN 52638)
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Lost Ottawa Xmas: A group of kids in Vars wave goodbye to Santa, as the Freimans Santa Claus train heads back to Ottawa Union Station in November of 1956.

Part of a Christmas promotion put on by Freimans every year from at least 1956 to 1961, in which Santa would fly into Vars by helicopter to meet a train full of kids from Ottawa. 

One adult in the middle looks super sad!

(CSTM CN 52638)

Comment on Facebook

Does anyone have photos of the annual Freeman Christmas window that was set up at the main doors? As a child I could stand there for the longest time just looking at everything.

we were fortunate to have been kids back then!

These are good memories.

Craig, I am looking for the specific photo, but was part of this series...

Thursday December 25th, 2014
Lost Ottawa

Lost Ottawa Xmas Special: Santa waves to kids in Vars as the Frieman's Santa Claus Special prepares to head back Ottawa Union Station in November of 1956.

Part of a promotion put on by Freiman's every year from at least 1956 to 1961, as near as I can tell. Not sure what the "mystery" element of event was.

Part of a series were running today.

(CSTM CN 52638)
... See MoreSee Less

Lost Ottawa Xmas Special: Santa waves to kids in Vars as the Friemans Santa Claus Special prepares to head back Ottawa Union Station in November of 1956.

Part of a promotion put on by Freimans every year from at least 1956 to 1961, as near as I can tell. Not sure what the mystery element of event was.

Part of a series were running today.

(CSTM CN 52638)

Comment on Facebook

I visited Freiman's every Saturday just to have one of their ice cold malted milk shakes in the bargain basement. 1962-65 ish.

Nice...

Thursday December 25th, 2014
Lost Ottawa

Lost Ottawa Xmas: Santa Claus with a group of kids in Vars, where Santa had just arrived by helicopter to meet the Frieman's Santa Claus Special train out of Ottawa's Union Station. Big day for the kids of Vars, too!

The event was part of a November promotion put on by Freiman's every year from at least 1956 to 1961, as near as I can tell.

Part of a series today.

(CSTM CN 52638)
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Lost Ottawa Xmas: Santa Claus with a group of kids in Vars, where Santa had just arrived by helicopter to meet the Friemans Santa Claus Special train out of Ottawas Union Station. Big day for the kids of Vars, too!

The event was part of a November promotion put on by Freimans every year from at least 1956 to 1961, as near as I can tell.

Part of a series today.

(CSTM CN 52638)

Comment on Facebook

It went longer as I remember it too!

Thursday December 25th, 2014
Lost Ottawa

Lost Ottawa Xmas: Santa Arrives by helicopter in Vars to meet the kids who had just arrived on Frieman's Santa Claus Special from Union Station. You can see the end of the train in the background. Date is 1956.

It seems Frieman's ran this train every November from at least 1956 to 1961. Frieman's famous Toyland would open the next day.

(CSTM CN 52638)
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Lost Ottawa Xmas: Santa Arrives by helicopter in Vars to meet the kids who had just arrived on Friemans Santa Claus Special from Union Station. You can see the end of the train in the background. Date is 1956.

It seems Friemans ran this train every November from at least 1956 to 1961. Friemans famous Toyland would open the next day.

(CSTM CN 52638)

Comment on Facebook

The Frieman Express. Did they serve hot chocolate too?

I was on that train. I remember that trip, felt like we went to Montreal.

It ran much later than that, almost up to the time when Friemans was bought by the Hudson's Bay Company in the early 1970s.

Bell 47 helicopter owned by Spartan Air Services Ltd., an Ottawa-based air survey company with bases in major Canadian cities as well as in the US and UK.

Thursday December 25th, 2014
Lost Ottawa

Lost Ottawa Xmas. Excited kids in Union Station get free tickets for the Freiman's Santa Claus Special in November of 1956.

First of a series. I'm taking it easy today!

(CSTM CN 52638)
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Lost Ottawa Xmas. Excited kids in Union Station get free tickets for the Freimans Santa Claus Special in November of 1956.

First of a series. Im taking it easy today!

(CSTM CN 52638)

Comment on Facebook

I never heard about this when I was growing up. Probably because my parents had 5 kids in 6 years, and two more (planned this time) later on.

Spent a few Friday evenings outside Friemans window like most kids just starring at the displays--would not change that for the world--

Are these photos from the Andrews-Newton collection at the City of Ottawa Archives?

Thursday December 25th, 2014
Lost Ottawa

I can't resist putting up this close-up of the enfants dreaming of space from our last post. Part of Christmas display in Ottawa's Union Station, December 1958. ... See MoreSee Less

I cant resist putting up this close-up of the enfants dreaming of space from our last post. Part of Christmas display in Ottawas Union Station, December 1958.
Thursday December 25th, 2014
Lost Ottawa

The Dream of Child at Christmas. A display over the telephone booths in Ottawa's Union Station in December of 1958.

By then Sputnik had happened and the race to put a man in space was on.
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The Dream of Child at Christmas. A display over the telephone booths in Ottawas Union Station in December of 1958.

By then Sputnik had happened and the race to put a man in space was on.

Comment on Facebook

We used to go to Frieman's store at Christmas.Does anyone have a photo?

Wednesday December 24th, 2014
Lost Ottawa

Christmas Tree at the Ottawa Orphans Home, located on the west side of Elgin between Lisgar and Cooper, 1895.

A little reminder that others don't have all that we have -- and a chance to say Merry Xmas to those who will be celebrating the ancient rituals tomorrow!

(LAC Mikan 3423063)
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Christmas Tree at the Ottawa Orphans Home, located on the west side of Elgin between Lisgar and Cooper, 1895. 

A little reminder that others dont have all that we have --  and a chance to say Merry Xmas to those who will be celebrating the ancient rituals tomorrow!

(LAC Mikan 3423063)

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That building would have been directly across Elgin Street from "The Ottawa Normal School" ... later Ottawa Teacher's College. Nothing 'normal' there in my mind!

Wednesday December 24th, 2014
Lost Ottawa

Santa visits the Ottawa Day Nursery, circa 1920 -- and also seems to have brought his own tree to put the presents under (in the back of that fine-looking truck).

There's no date on this photo, but it would appear to be between 1916 and 1925, when the nursery was located at 87 Albert Street.

The Nursery moved to the Andrew Fleck Memorial building at 195 George in 1932, and the organization is now know as the Andrew Fleck Child Centre.

(LAC Mikan 105578)
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Santa visits the Ottawa Day Nursery, circa 1920 -- and also seems to have brought his own tree to put the presents under (in the back of that fine-looking truck).

Theres no date on this photo, but it would appear to be between 1916 and 1925, when the nursery was located at 87 Albert Street.

The Nursery moved to the Andrew Fleck Memorial building at 195 George in 1932, and the organization is now know as the Andrew Fleck Child Centre. 

(LAC Mikan 105578)

Comment on Facebook

...no parking on Albert Street even then!

,,and tire chains on the rear wheels..

Neat "no parking" sign for the police department

Andrew Fleck Child Care Services is the largest child care organization in the City, offering centre-based care, Licensed Home Child Care, Ontario Early Years Centre, Short-Term Child Care, amongst other services. The main office is on Industrial now.

the license plate is a 1927 commercial vehicle ( C suffix) so that would be when the photo was taken.

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Wednesday December 24th, 2014
Lost Ottawa

Miniature steam engine fired up and ready to take children around the inside of Ottawa's Science and Tech Museum.

There's no date on this picture, but I've been told that running the steam engine was part of the Museum's Christmas-time programming for several years in the 70s and possibly the 1980s.

I bet some of those involved are still around.
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Miniature steam engine fired up and ready to take children around the inside of Ottawas Science and Tech Museum.

Theres no date on this picture, but Ive been told that running the steam engine was part of the Museums Christmas-time programming for several years in the 70s and possibly the 1980s.

I bet some of those involved are still around.

Comment on Facebook

My favorite part of the Museum is the Crazy Kitchen. I still remember the first time through it! Weirdest feeling ever!

I'm the blond boy with the orange sweater

Those 3-stripe Adidas shoes were also big in the mid 70s.

Does anyone have photos of the Christmas displays that used to be in the A.J. Freiman Store on Rideau Street?

They had the live steam models on an outdoor track at Railfair at Algonquin College a few years back.

That is Duncan Dufrese on the engine

I remember a gentleman who lived at about 346 Marshall Crt that had a steam train.Us kids could ride on the train running all throughout his basement and out onto a trax network in his back yard.I would often just stop by and watch over the fence .I think the years were app 1968?

Yeah I had a pair of those plaid pants definitely early 70s

There were a lot of baggy plaid pants in the mid 70s too!

Wow, totally forgot about that! Saw it in the mid 70's when I was in Beavers or Cub scouts....

Nice

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Wednesday December 24th, 2014
Lost Ottawa

Inside Ottawa ... It's the day before Christmas, so quite a few of us will be visiting the Boozeterium.

Here's the 66 Sussex Street wine shop of wine merchant D. McDonnell.
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Inside Ottawa ... Its the day before Christmas, so quite a few of us will be visiting the Boozeterium. 

Heres the 66 Sussex Street wine shop of wine merchant D. McDonnell.

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So "special family" means you went ot the grocers that carried only alcohol? 😉

I can't imagine English wine was a hit even back then.

Cool photo. Do you happen to know what year this would be?

This is exactly why the LCBO was formed. Drunk cat, balanced on the edge of a barstool.

Wednesday December 24th, 2014
Lost Ottawa

Ottawa high school students help out with the Christmas rush at the Post Office in 1943.

(LAC Mikan 3228593)
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Ottawa high school students help out with the Christmas rush at the Post Office in 1943.

(LAC Mikan 3228593)

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It's interesting that all the boys are one side of the table and all the girls are on the other. Only boys are at the pigeon holes. I wonder why.

i did this on Parkdale

I did that too.@

I remember older kids getting that job.

Wednesday December 24th, 2014
Lost Ottawa

Soon it really will be the last minute, and some brave men will finally have to face the perfume counter. Here, a picture of Ottawa retail shopping circa 1955 ... and a puzzler, too.

What store is this?

(Photo: Malak, LAC MIkan 3237872)
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Soon it really will be the last minute, and some brave men will finally have to face the perfume counter.  Here, a picture of Ottawa retail shopping circa 1955 ... and a puzzler, too.

What store is this?

(Photo: Malak, LAC MIkan 3237872)

Comment on Facebook

Looks an awful lot like Ogilvy's when it was downtown.

I'd bet it's Freiman's. Daylight through the doors facing south. It's the first floor of what's now the Bay on Rideau! mmmm Malts in the Basement!!

I vote for Freimans on Rideau.

It could be Sears at Carlingwood.

Look like Murphy Gamble on sparks st

I agree with Freiman's Rideau Street store. The Ogilvies store never had this same feeling of size as it was broken up into smaller areas by being wrapped around ahe original Trudel's Hardware store.

I think Ogilvy's at corner of Rideau and Nicholas

Freimans, Rideau Street!

Freimans

Freeman's on Rideau and yes malt's in the basement, only if you behaved. Everyone did of course!

It could be Murphy-Gamble on Sparks.

Looks like Freimans to me too.

Hmm can we confirm this is Freiman's Lost Ottawa? the Mikan record doesn't provide any information as to the location.

i worked at caplan's as a teen (VERY briefly - it was hell!) and i don't think this is it! too big and bright and airy. it also seems too big for freiman's, although that would be my guess, since sears carlingwood wasn't built in 1955.

Looks à lot like Freeman

Too big for Ogilvys, I think.

I'd say Freeman on Rideau.

I vote for Friemans and yes we did love the malts. Also I got my first pair of roller skates from Trudel Hardware for $3.95

How about Caplan's?

Maybe Caplan's which was on the same side as Freiman's

Murphy Gamble

Looks like Freimans

How about Eatons

Could it be on Sparks street?

Looks like Freiman's because it's spacious. Ogilvys was only 2 columns wide on Rideau. Wasn't that big, so it can't be them. If not, maybe Caplans?

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Tuesday December 23rd, 2014
Lost Ottawa

Some sweet-looking Ottawa vehicles in this view, looking south-west along Albert from Metcalfe Street in 1938.

I can't determine the makes, but the car on the right appears to have the most amazing hood ornament, as well as suicide doors. The jaunty beige car behind (with the curved grill) is what they often called a "businessman's coupe." Sporty!

Double parked down the street is a earlier car that helps to illustrate the big styling changes that took place in the Thirties, from square to rounded. They would have said "aerodynamic" or "streamlined."

(LAC Mikan 4125064)
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Some sweet-looking Ottawa vehicles in this view, looking south-west along Albert from Metcalfe Street in 1938.

I cant determine the makes, but the car on the right appears to have the most amazing hood ornament, as well as suicide doors. The jaunty beige car behind (with the curved grill) is what they often called a businessmans coupe. Sporty!

Double parked down the street is a earlier car that helps to illustrate the big styling changes that took place in the Thirties, from square to rounded. They would have said aerodynamic or streamlined.

(LAC Mikan 4125064)

Comment on Facebook

1936 Ford and the mascot is a Greyhound

Pristine streets! Never fails to amaze me.

The car in front is a '36 Ford. The one behind it is a '38 Plymouth

You can see the Bell Canada building at the corner of Albert and O'Connor that is still there...the first part of it at least!

Possibly a 1930's Jaguar saloon? compare with this pic of a 1938 model which has the same sort of grill work.

I notice there seem to be no bicycle lane markings?

It looks like the jaguar leaper 1938 hood ornament.

The dark car looks more like a 38 Buick Special series 40, not nearly as exotic as as a Jaguar.

its a safe bet that not one is a Honda,Toyota or Nissan. Both streets are now one way, it sure looks a lot different now.

I guess it was a time when car drivers and bicycle riders knew how to respect each other.

Those were the days

I am asking any one who might happen to have a photo of the building at the corner of Nepian and bank facing East?

Is this a Topley?

first car is a 36 ford. 2nd a late 30s plymouth, 3rd is a 37 ford

Ford was sporting greyhounds on their better models at the time. Jaguar was a nameplate of Swallow, and would have been pretty exotic in North America in 1938. Occam's razor suggests, therefore, a Ford.

Looks like a '35 buick

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Tuesday December 23rd, 2014
Lost Ottawa

Architect's beautiful rendering of a Ottawa "villa" for a Mrs. Caroline Gibbs. Located on the north or southwest corner of Cartier and McLaren in the Golden Triangle (both corners now occupied by apartment buildings).

I've included the description of the west side of Cartier from the city directory for 1891-92. You can see for yourself how empty the area still was at the time. Mrs. Gibbs was a pioneer!

(LAC Mikan 203330)
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Architects beautiful rendering of a Ottawa villa for a Mrs. Caroline Gibbs. Located on the north or southwest corner of Cartier and McLaren in the Golden Triangle (both corners now occupied by apartment buildings).

Ive included the description of the west side of Cartier from the city directory for 1891-92. You can see for yourself how empty the area still was at the time. Mrs. Gibbs was a pioneer!

(LAC Mikan 203330)Image attachment

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Wow. Guessing you don't have images for the other elevations? (Sided and rear) Any way I could get a large scale scan via email? I'm a 3D animator and modeller, and would love to turn this classic beauty into an animated piece.

Would be neat to see a house like that built today. Not a cookie cutter

there is a big mansion on the north east corner which looks like that house

Monday December 22nd, 2014
Lost Ottawa

Woodroffe High ... from on high above Ottawa.

Shared by Edward King, who writes:Woodroffe High School and the Transitway being built early 1980's
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Woodroffe High ... from on high above Ottawa. 

Shared by Edward King, who writes:

Comment on Facebook

I can see my house! (Connaught Avenue)

I graduated in 75 from that school check facts before posting

I went to that school

Note the loop ramp to the Ottawa River Parkway that was removed with the opening of the Transitway.

I see the smoking tree!

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Monday December 22nd, 2014
Lost Ottawa

Aerial of the Ottawa River, with Nepean Point cleft by the approach road to the Alexandra Bridge ...

Shared by our pals at the Bytown Museum, who write:All this talk of the Alexandra Bridge led us to pull one of our Collections Manager's favourite photos, entitled "Nepean Point & Ottawa River from Victoria Tower." The image comes from one of the personal photograph albums of Samuel Jarvis in the holdings of the Bytown Museum. Circa 1902.

Like this? We're digitizing our entire collection and if you "like" us on Facebook you'll be sure to see all of our posts!

[Bytown Museum, P3217]
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Aerial of the Ottawa River, with Nepean Point cleft by the approach road to the Alexandra Bridge ... 

Shared by our pals at the Bytown Museum, who write:

Comment on Facebook

nice, from the old tower

Monday December 22nd, 2014
Lost Ottawa

Logs in the Ottawa River, shared by Lebreton Flats Remembered.

It seems we are looking downriver, which would suggest photo was taken from the Alexandra Bridge.

Also looks like the photographer tired to snag this one from a moving streetcar. Or else the darn streetcar drove into his picture at the last second ...Floating logs in the Ottawa River viewed from a train, Ottawa, ON, 1907.
Gift of Mr. Donald B. Welbourn to the museum.
courtesy Mccord Museum:

Photograph | Floating logs in the Ottawa River from the train, Ottawa, ON, 1907 | M2003.28.33
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Logs in the Ottawa River, shared by Lebreton Flats Remembered. 

It seems we are looking downriver, which would suggest photo was taken from the Alexandra Bridge. 

Also looks like the photographer tired to snag this one from a moving streetcar. Or else the darn streetcar drove into his picture at the last second ...

Comment on Facebook

I actually really like the blurred silhouette of the conductor and the streetcar. Makes the picture feel alive.

Monday December 22nd, 2014
Lost Ottawa

Looking down from Nepean Point onto the Ketchum Boat Works below Lady Grey Drive. Note the buildings along Sussex at the time. Also some Old School Motor yachts in the foreground.This is an uncommon and attractive view showing Sussex Drive at the top right, Lady Grey Drive in the foreground, and the wharf of the Ketchum Boat Company (no longer in existence) which serviced vessels plying the Ottawa River. The Ketchum building was apparently red in colour. View taken from an original albumen print (5" x 7"), circa 1930 in my opinion. ... See MoreSee Less

Looking down from Nepean Point onto the Ketchum Boat Works below Lady Grey Drive. Note the buildings along Sussex at the time. Also some Old School Motor yachts in the foreground.

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LAC has a very similar photo (MIKAN 3358876) dated May 8, 1918.

Wow! Love these pics!!

Remember this. My brother-in-law's father had a motor boat stored in that boathouse. Been there. This area was my playground in the mid 40's till mid 50's

What a fantastic shot!

Monday December 22nd, 2014
Lost Ottawa

The Alexandra Interprovincial Bridge under construction across the Ottawa River in 1900. Waiting for one more span ...

Looking down from Nepean Point.

(Engineering and Contract Record, July 9, 1915)
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The Alexandra Interprovincial Bridge under construction across the Ottawa River in 1900. Waiting for one more span ...

Looking down from Nepean Point.

(Engineering and Contract Record, July 9, 1915)

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Paging Bo and Luke Duke

Monday December 22nd, 2014
Lost Ottawa

Tugs tow one of the spans of the Alexandra Interprovincial Bridge into place in 1900. Best copy I could make from the original.

As seen here, the spans were constructed on top of wooden falsework on top of huge rafts. But there's also a puzzler here ...

I always assumed the spans were towed up-river, which would mean we are on the Ontario side. So what appears here to be the anchor span for the Quebec side seems to be facing the wrong way. Possibly they had to float it up and turn it around?

(From the Engineering and Contract Record for July 9, 1915)
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Tugs tow one of the spans of the Alexandra Interprovincial Bridge into place in 1900. Best copy I could make from the original. 

As seen here, the spans were constructed on top of wooden falsework on top of huge rafts. But theres also a puzzler here ...

I always assumed the spans were towed up-river, which would mean we are on the Ontario side. So what appears here to be the anchor span for the Quebec side seems to be facing the wrong way. Possibly they had to float it up and turn it around?

(From the Engineering and Contract Record for July 9, 1915)

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The Lost Ottawa photos are some of the best things to pop up on my Facebook feed. Thanks for the work that you do, and keep it up!

An explanation of the photo can be found here: www.railways.incanada.net/Articles/Article2001_1.html

Looking at the piers, the leading edge faces up river. The photo was taken from the Ontario side. Tugs are going against the current. Float it up and then come down with the current is my guess. It helps when the current in the water below is perpendicular to the bridge. Not the case closer to Nepean Point.

excellent article about the interprovincial bridge its too bad those trains are not still running

Perhaps copying has reversed the picture?

Looks like it might be one half of the false work for the span between the short piers (ie where the tugs are in the photo). Or perhaps it is for the Quebec side and they towed it up past where it goes and floated it back down into position?

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Sunday December 21st, 2014
Lost Ottawa

Peaceful ending to our series taken from the "Souvenir of Ottawa" album, showing what were thought to be classic aspects of city in the 1910's.

Here a gentleman enjoys a moment alone on the Ottawa River, far from the bustle of the everyday, his view filled with the beautiful greenery of the city's parks.

We still have the parks, if not so many quiet moments.
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Peaceful ending to our series taken from the Souvenir of Ottawa album, showing what were thought to be classic aspects of city in the 1910s.

Here a gentleman enjoys a moment alone on the Ottawa River, far from the bustle of the everyday, his view filled with the beautiful greenery of the citys parks.

We still have the parks, if not so many quiet moments.
Sunday December 21st, 2014
Lost Ottawa

Second last picture in our series taken from the "Souvenir of Ottawa" album, published around 1920, showing what were thought to be classic features of the city in the 1910's.

Here we have the view from Rockcliffe Park over the confluence of the Ottawa and Gatineau Rivers as a steamer makes its way to wharves at Nepean Point.
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Second last picture in our series taken from the Souvenir of Ottawa album, published around 1920, showing what were thought to be classic features of the city in the 1910s.

Here we have the view from Rockcliffe Park over the confluence of the Ottawa and Gatineau Rivers as a steamer makes its way to wharves at Nepean Point.

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Can anybody identify the steamer?

Wow!! Nice to see the Ottawa river in those days!! Wonder from where that Steamer was coming from???

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